OFSAA FIBA - ... FIBA RULES NOT APPLIED The FIBA rules are not applied to the high school game for time-outs

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  • 
 OFSAA – FIBA 
 (HIGH SCHOOL) 


    2016


    © F. Cecchetto 2016

  • “INTERVALS OF

    PLAY”
 An Interval of Play …. BEGINS: • when the officials arrive on the floor

    prior to the start of the game, but is not greater than 20 minutes

    • when the horn sounds to end the period

    ENDS: • when the ball leaves the hands of the

    official for the opening jump ball • at the beginning of each period when

    the ball is placed at the disposal of the player taking the throw-in

  • IMPORTANT POINTS

    NOTE: All fouls called during an INTERVAL OF PLAY are TECHNICAL FOULS which also count as 1 of the 5 player fouls and as 1 of the team fouls that results in a team foul penalty situation. After 4 team fouls, two free throws will be awarded for every foul committed by your opponent in that quarter. “1 and a Bonus” no longer exists (n.b., there are never any free throws awarded for a player control or a team control foul). NOTE: Without exception, every game begins with a jump ball. There are no additional jump balls in a game. That includes all extra periods, if required.

  • 1. WARM-UP • recommended 20 minutes • NO DUNKING IN WARM-UP – penalty

    for dunking is a player technical (as the foul has taken place during an Interval of Play)

  • 2. GAME LENGTH • 4, 8 minute periods • 4 minutes for each extra period

    required • 1 minute interval between periods 1 and

    2, and 1 minute interval between periods 3 and 4

    • 1 minute interval between any extra period

    • 10 minute half-time (or less if both teams agree)

  • 3. THE RESTRICTED

    AREA 
 (KEY) • use the high school (NFHS) restricted

    area (key) • if a gym does not have a high school

    restricted area, then use the most recent FIBA restricted area

  • 4. 3 POINT SHOT
 • use the high school (NFHS) 3 point arc

    (19.75 ft.) • if the NFHS arc is not available - use the

    old FIBA 3 point arc (6.25m), or if only the new FIBA arc is on the court use it (6.75m)

  • H.S. 35 Second Shot

    Clock (OFSAA)
 Signals:

    . ¬ Shot Clock Violation Reset Shot Clock

  • 
The 35 Second Shot Clock:

    The 35 Second Shot Clock begins whenever: • A player gains control of a live ball on

    the playing court, • On a throw-in, the ball touches or is

    legally touched by any player on the playing court and the team of that player taking the throw-in remains in control of the ball.

    Note: A team must attempt a shot for a

    field goal within 35 seconds. To constitute a shot for a field goal within 35 seconds:

  • • The ball must leave the player's hand(s) before the shot clock signal sounds, and • After the ball has left the player's hand(s), the ball must touch the ring or enter the basket.

    When a shot for a field goal is attempted near the end of the 35-second period and the shot

    clock signal sounds while the ball is in the air:

    • If the ball enters the basket, no violation.

    • If the ball touches the ring but does not enter the basket, no violation. The signal shall be disregarded and the game shall continue.

    • If the ball misses the ring, a violation has occurred; however, if the opponents (team on defence) have

  • gained immediate and clear control of the ball, the signal shall be disregarded and the game shall continue.

  • Shot Clock Operator: Resets the clock to 35 seconds: 1. When the ball touches the ring of the

    opponents’ basket (unless the ball lodges between the ring and the backboard).

    2. When the ball enters the basket. 3. When a team is awarded a throw-in

    as the result of a foul or violation. 4. When the team on defence gains

    control of the ball during play, e.g., - intercepts a pass - steals a dribble 5 When a team is awarded free throws. 6 On instructions from an official.

    No Reset: 1. When the ball goes out of bounds

    and the team that had control will be

  • awarded the ball for the throw-in. 2. On a held ball, when the team that

    had control will be awarded the ball for a throw-in as a result of the possession arrow.

    3. On a double foul, when the ball is awarded to the team that was previously in control.

  • Starting the 35 Second Clock

    1. On the opening jump ball: When a

    team gains control of the ball 2. On a throw-in: When the ball touches

    or is touched by any player on the floor

    3. On a rebound: When a player on the floor gains control.

  • Turn the shot clock off:

    1. When there are less than 35 seconds

    remaining in any quarter.

    Shot Clock Advice: 1. If in doubt, don’t reset. 2. Don’t reset after a whistle until

    officials have finished any communication on floor and/or to table.

    3. Get in the habit of taking a mental note of the time showing on the shot clock (and game clock) if/as possible before you reset it (in case a correction is needed).

    4. Pay attention to whether in your judgment, a shot was released before the signal sounds or not (there may

  • be a case where the officials may consult with you, such as loud gym or inaudible signal).

  • INTERPRETATIONS OF SHOT CLOCK

    PROCEDURES (OFSAA) • The modifications to FIBA rules,

    concerning the shot clock, create exceptions or adjustments to the FIBA casebook and the CABO casebook with regards to shot clock rulings (Articles 29/50). In all cases all references to 24 seconds, and 14 second resets, do not apply to FIBA high school games using the OFSAA modifications. All shot clock periods are 35 seconds and all resets are to 35 seconds as well.

    • So in the FIBA Interpretations,

    statements 29/50-12; 29/50-27; and 29/50-33 to 29/50-42 inclusive, do not apply.

  • There are some interpretations in the Canadian FIBA addition of the handbook, that will need some

    further modification. 
They are as follows:

    FIBA CASEBOOK Statements and examples from 29/50-46 to 29/50-50: All resets are 35 seconds and if less than 35 seconds remains in the period then the shot clock is turned off.

    FIBA CASEBOOK

    Cont’d. 29/50-51 Example:

  • With 58 seconds remaining on the game clock in the 4th period A1 is fouled in his back court by B1. Team A has 19 seconds remaining on the shot clock. This is Team B’s 3rd foul in the period. Team A is granted a time-out. Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a Team A throw-in at the point of interruption with 35 seconds on the shot clock.

    FIBA CASEBOOK Cont’d.

    29/50-53 Example:

    With 30 seconds remaining on the

    game clock in the 4th period A1

    dribbles in his front court. B1 taps

    the ball to Team A’s backcourt

    where A2 now controls the ball. B2

  • fouls A2 with 8 seconds remaining

    on the shot clock. This is Team B’s

    3rd foul in the period. Team A is

    granted a time-out.

    Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a Team A throw-in at the point of the foul, or the point of interruption with the shot clock turned off.

    CABO CASEBOOK

    29-5 The Interpretation would be the same as 29/50-51 above and the shot clock is set to 35 seconds. 29-12

  • Team A scores a basket with 0:28 left in the 4th period. Coach B requests a time-out. When play resumes, should the shot clock be reset to 14 seconds? NO. The shot clock shall be turned off as there are less than 35 seconds remaining on the game clock. The throw-in shall be made from Team B’s endline, with the opportunity to run the endline. 29-16; 29-17; 29-18; 29-19; 29-22 will not apply to FIBA high school games using the OFSAA modifications. 29-20 and 29-21 … the resets will be to 35 seconds in all cases.

    NO SHOT CLOCK

  • AVAILABLE CLOSELY GUARDED SITUATIONS: • The FIBA Rule (Article 27.1, 27.2) A closely guarded count is applied when a player is holding the ball, and a defensive player is playing active defense within 1 metre, anywhere on the court. When there is no shot clock, if in the judgment of the officials a team is withholding the ball from play or purposely delaying, a continuous closely guarded count will be applied to the offensive player who is being actively guarded within 1 metre while both holding and/or dribbling the ball. EXAMPLE: A player receives the ball and is being closely guarded for 3 seconds, than begins to dribble and the defender

  • keeps actively guarding within one metre for another 2 seconds. RULING = VIOLATION (NOTE: This may be applied at any point in the game if the officials think any team is stalling on purpose.)

    SUBSTITUTIONS • Substitutions will be handled as per

    FIBA rules. • Please note: A time-out taken between

    free-throws (as allowed in OFSAA (H.S.) FIBA rules) does not create an opportunity for substitution. This is an exception.

    • Substitutions are