Neurobiology of relapse to heroin and cocaine seeking: An update and clinical implications

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    2.2.1. Discrete cues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

    European Journal of Pharmacology2.2.2. Discriminative cues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402.2.3. Contextual cues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402.2.4. Incubation of cocaine craving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

    2.3. Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422.4. Summary and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

    3. Implications for relapse prevention in humans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

    1. Introduction

    The central problem for treatment of heroin and cocaine

    abstinence (relapse) (Mendelson and Mello, 1996; O'Brien,1997; Wallace, 1989). Studies in humans provide evidence thatrelapse to heroin or cocaine use or craving for these drugs can be 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Keywords: Cocaine; Conditioned drug cues; Extinction; Heroin; Incubation; Reinstatement; Relapse; Review; Stress

    Contents

    1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362. Brain sites and circuits underlying relapse to heroin and cocaine seeking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

    2.1. Cocaine and heroin priming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372.2. Cocaine and heroin cues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39An update and clinical implications

    Jennifer M. Bossert a,1, Udi E. Ghitza a,1, Lin Lu a, David H. Epstein b,1, Yavin Shaham a,

    a Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, IRP/NIDA/NIH/DHHS, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USAb Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Research Branch, IRP/NIDA/NIH/DHHS, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA

    Accepted 23 September 2005Available online 14 November 2005

    Abstract

    The central problem in the treatment of cocaine and heroin addiction is high rates of relapse to drug use after periods of forced or self-imposedabstinence. Relapse can bemodeled in laboratory animals a reinstatement procedure in which responding for drug is extinguished and then reinstated byacute exposure to the drug, drug cues, or stress. In this review, we first summarize data from recent (20032005) studies on the neural substratesinvolved in reinstatement of heroin and cocaine seeking.We also discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the progressive increase in cocaine seekingafter withdrawal (incubation of cocaine craving). Finally, we provide an update on several novel candidate medications for relapse prevention suggestedby recent preclinical studies, and we discuss the translation of findings from nonhuman laboratory studies to the clinical phenomenon of relapse.Re

    Neurobiology of relapse toaddiction remains the return to drug use after periods of

    Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 410 550 1746; fax: +1 410 550 1612.E-mail address: yshaham@intra.nida.nih.gov (Y. Shaham).

    1 These authors contributed equally to the present review.

    0014-2999/$ - see front matter 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2005.09.030w

    eroin and cocaine seeking:

    526 (2005) 3650www.elsevier.com/locate/ejphartriggered by exposure to the self-administered drug (de Wit,1996; Meyer andMirin, 1979), drug-associated cues (Carter andTiffany, 1999; Childress et al., 1993) or stress (Sinha, 2001). Weand others have argued that this clinical scenario can be modeledin a reinstatement model using laboratory rats and monkeys

  • 1999; Khroyan et al., 2000; Marinelli et al., 2003; Self et al.,1996; Wise et al., 1990).

    In earlier studies, Stewart (1984) and Stewart and Vezina(1988) found that intra-VTA infusions of morphine, whichincreases dopamine cell firing and release, reinstate heroin orcocaine seeking, and intra-accumbens infusions of amphe-tamine, which increases local dopamine release, reinstate heroinseeking. Based on these studies and studies using systemic druginjections, there wasuntil recentlya consensus that accum-bens dopamine activity mediates reinstatement induced bycocaine and heroin priming.

    This view has been challenged by data from a series ofstudies by Kalivas and McFarland. Based on their data, theseinvestigators argue that cocaine priming-induced reinstatementis mediated not by accumbens dopamine transmission, but byglutamatergic activation of accumbens -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (Kalivas

    al o(Epstein and Preston, 2003; Shaham et al., 2003; Spealman et al.,1999; Stewart, 2000), but see Katz and Higgins (2003) for adifferent view.

    In the operant version of the reinstatement model, laboratoryanimals are trained to self-administer drugs and are then subjectedto extinction training duringwhich lever presses are not reinforcedwith drugs. Reinstatement of extinguished lever responding (theoperational measure of drug seeking) is determined after suchmanipulations as noncontingent priming injections of the drug(deWit and Stewart, 1981; Stretch et al., 1971), exposure to cuesassociated with drug intake (Davis and Smith, 1976; Meil andSee, 1996) or exposure to stress (Erb et al., 1996; Shaham andStewart, 1995). During testing for reinstatement, extinctionconditions remain in effect (drug is not available).

    In the conditioned place preference (CPP) variation of thereinstatement model, laboratory animals are trained to associatea distinct environment with drug injections and are thensubjected to extinction training during which they are exposedto the same environment in the absence of drug. Resumption ofpreference for that environment is then determined afternoncontingent priming injections of the drug (Mueller andStewart, 2000; Parker and McDonald, 2000) or exposure tostress (Sanchez and Sorg, 2001).

    The effects of drug-associated cues on relapse to drugseeking can also be examined in extinction tests that areadministered at different days after the termination of drug self-administration (Di Ciano and Everitt, 2004a; Lu et al., 2004b;Tran-Nguyen et al., 1998). This permits characterization of thetime course of susceptibility to relapse to drug seeking.

    In this review we summarize selected results from preclinicalstudies on reinstatement of cocaine or heroin (or morphine)seeking. In 20002003, several comprehensive reviews on thistopic were published (Kalivas and McFarland, 2003; See, 2002;Shaham et al., 2003; Shalev et al., 2002; Stewart, 2000, 2003);these reviews covered the literature from 1971 to 2002.Therefore, our review is an update, focusing on studiespublished from January 2003 to April 2005, and complementinga recent review on the neurobiology of drug craving and relapsebyWeiss (2005). OurMedline and ISI searches of drug studies inwhich investigators used reinstatement and extinction proce-dures found 129 published papers since 2003, reflecting theincreasing popularity of these procedures during the last decade(Fig. 1). To conserve space, the first part of our review (on theneuroanatomy of reinstatement of heroin or cocaine seeking)omits studies in which drugs were injected only systemically. Inthe second part of the review, we discuss potential relapse-prevention medications that emerge from reinstatement andextinction studies and also address issues related to thetranslation of findings from non-human laboratory experimentsto clinical settings.

    2. Brain sites and circuits underlying relapse to heroin andcocaine seeking

    J.M. Bossert et al. / European JournIn the following sections, we discuss recent developments inthe understanding of the brain sites and circuits underlyingrelapse induced by cocaine or heroin priming, drug cues, andstress. Within each section, we briefly summarize the state ofknowledge as of 2002 and then discuss data from neuro-anatomical studies that were published in 20032005.

    2.1. Cocaine and heroin priming

    A large body of evidence indicates that the reinforcingeffects of heroin and cocaine are mediated by the drugs' actionsin the ventral tegmental area (VTA, the cell body region ofthe mesolimbic dopamine system) and the nucleus accum-bens (a terminal region of this system) (Wise, 1996). Resultsfrom studies using systemic drug injections indicate thatdopamine neurotransmission mediates cocaine-induced re-instatement (Self and Nestler, 1998; Shalev et al., 2002;Spealman et al., 1999). There is also evidence implicatingdopamine neurotransmission in heroin-induced reinstatement(Ettenberg et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1999; Shaham andStewart, 1996). Reinstatement induced by cocaine priming ismediated by activation of dopamine D2-like, but not dopamineD1-like, receptors (Alleweireldt et al., 2003; De Vries et al.,

    Fig. 1. Cumulative number of published studies that used extinction andreinstatement procedures in laboratory animals to study relapse to opiates,psychostimulants, or alcohol seeking. Source: Pubmed and ISI.

    37f Pharmacology 526 (2005) 3650and McFarland, 2003). The initial evidence for this hypothesiswas derived from three studies. Cornish et al. (1999; Cornishand Kalivas, 2000) reported that while activation of both

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