Click here to load reader

Lepidoptera Moths, Skippers, Butterflies Lepidoptera Lepidoptera Moths, Skippers, Butterflies `Adults `Coiled proboscis for sucking `2 pairs of membranous wings covered with scales

  • View
    7

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Lepidoptera Moths, Skippers, Butterflies Lepidoptera Lepidoptera Moths, Skippers, Butterflies...

  • Lepidoptera Moths, Skippers, Butterflies

    Adults Coiled proboscis for sucking 2 pairs of membranous wings covered with scales Antennae: Moths – feather or saw-like; skippers – hooked; butterflies - knobbed

    Larvae Caterpillars have mandibles for chewing; prolegs with crotchets on 5 or fewer abdominal segments

    Complete metamorphosis

    Lepidoptera

    Most diverse group of leaf feeders Large larvae eat entire leaf Smaller larvae eat holes or mine leafs Borers in wood or stems Few species are predators

    Eastern Tent Caterpillar Lasiocampidae

    Early-season defoliator – 1st caterpillar of season Host Plants

    Prefer wild cherry, crabapple, apple

  • Forest Tent Caterpillar Lasiocampidae

    Early-season defoliator – 2nd caterpillar of season Host Plants

    Deciduous trees – prefers oak, sugar maple, black gum, sweet gum, poplar, birch, elm, ash, willow, hawthorn, and fruit trees

    Spring and Fall Cankerworm Geometridae

    Early-season defoliator Larvae finished feeding by early June

    Host Plants Many deciduous trees – apple, elm, oak, hickory, linden, birch, beech, and maple

  • Winter Moth Operophtera brumata

    By Robert Childs

  • Fall CankerwormWinter Moth Winter Moth and Fall Cankerworm Females

    This photograph courtesy of Dr. David Wagner, UConn

    Euonymus Leaf Notcher Pryeria sinica Early Signs of Pryeria Damage

  • And Eventually… Eggs and Small Larvae

    Small and Mature Larvae Gypsy Moth Erebidae

    Tussuck moths Introduced pest (1860’s) Early season defoliator 1 generation / year

  • Gypsy Moth

    Preferred host plants: Oak, sweetgum, linden, willow, birch, apple, boxelder, hawthorn

    Resistant host plants: Tuliptree, sycamore, black locust, ash, American holly, mulberry, red cedar

  • Entomophaga maimaiga – imported twice, once in early 1900’s and again in 1980’s Moth Gypsy Defoliation

  • Fall Webworm Erebidae Mid and late season defoliator Fall WW has 2 color forms –

    black heads with yellow bodies and red heads with brown bodies late instar larvae ~ 1” with paired black turbercles and long hair

    Host Plants Many deciduous trees – Prefers mulberry, walnut, hickory, elm, sweetgum, poplar, willow, oak, linden, ash, and fruit trees

  • Mimosa Webworm Plutellidae

    Mid and late season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ ½” long; pale green to brown w/ 5 longitudinal white stripes

    Host Plants Mimosa, honeylocust (thornless)

  • Juniper Webworm Gelechiidae

    Late and early season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ ¾” long; tan with brown stripes Host Plants

    Many species of junipers, prefers columnar junipers Resistant varieties – Juniperus chinensis “pfitzeriana”, Savin juniper

    Juniper Webworm Gelechiidae Biology

    One generation per year Overwinter as larvae within webbed branches Caterpillars tightly web together branches; feed within webbed branches In spring adults mate and lay eggs

    Pine Webworm Pyralidae

    Mid to late season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ ¾” long; tan with 4 black stripes

    Host Plants Many species of pines; prefer Pitch, mugo, scotch and Virginia

    Pine Webworm Pyralidae Biology

    One generation per year Overwinter as pupae in soil under trees Young caterpillars mine needles; older larvae consume needles while building protective nests composed of frass and silk surrounding terminals In spring adults mate and lay eggs

    Pine Webworm Pyralidae

    Damage Needles turn yellow due to young larvae mining needles; mature larvae consume entire needles; Larvae build webbed nests around terminal which are unsightly (webbing, frass, brown needles)

  • Yellownecked Caterpillar Notodontidae

    Late season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ 2” long; black with yellow neck and several yellow stripes

    Host Plants Prefers shade and fruit trees

    Orangestriped Oakworm Saturniidae

    Mid season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ 1 ½” long; black with 8 orange-yellow stripes; 2 black spines behind head; spines on side of abdomen

    Host Plants Prefers oak, also feed on hickory and birch

  • Orangestriped Oakworm Saturniidae Biology

    Two generations per year Overwinter as pupae in soil Caterpillars active June through September

    Orangestriped Oakworm

    Damage Gregarious and usually feed on one branch at a time Young caterpillars skeletonize Older larvae defoliate branches

    Redhumped Caterpillar Notodontidae Biology

    One generation per year Overwinter as pupae in leaf litter Caterpillars feed in clusters June through September

  • Azalea Caterpillar Notodontidae

    Late season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ 2 ½” long, black with rows of white spots, reddish head, neck area, and legs

    Host Plants Prefers azalea

    Greenstriped Mapleworm Saturniidae

    Mid season defoliator Larvae

    Mature larvae ~ 1 ½” long, green with reddish head, 2 black horns, and several stripes

    Host Plants Prefers maples, especially red, sugar, and silver maples

  • Severe pest of boxwoods in Europe

    Detected in Toronto in 2018

    Hymenoptera Suborder Apocrita:

    Wasps, Hornets, Ants, Bees

    Chewing mouthparts (adults and larvae) 2 pairs membranous wings, front larger then back, hooks on front margin of hind wings Abdomen constricted at thorax (adults) Females have ovipositor or stinger (adults) Complete metamorphosis Larvae are legless Parasitic and phytophagous

    Hymenoptera Suborder Symphyta: sawflies

    Chewing mouthparts (adults and larvae) 2 pairs membranous wings, front larger then back, hooks on front margin of hind wings Abdomen broadly joined to thorax (adults) Females have retracted saw-like ovipositor (adults) Complete metamorphosis Larvae resemble caterpillars, but 6 or more prolegs without crotchets, 1 pr simple eyes Most are phytophagous

    Redheaded Pine Sawfly Diprionidae

    Native sawfly Late instar larvae about 1”; reddish head; a yellowish-white body with 6 rows of irregular spots Host Plants

    Prefers mugo, jack, red, shortleaf, loblolly, slash, longleaf, pitch, Japanese black

    Redheaded Pine Sawfly Diprionidae Biology

    2 generations Pre-pupae overwinter in cocoons in soil Active May-June, Aug.-Oct. Eggs deposited into needles (brown spots) Eggs hatch, larvae are gregarious and feed on needles of terminal twigs and branches

  • White Pine Sawfly Diprionidae

    Native sawfly Late instar larvae about 1”; black head; pale yellow to white body with 4 rows of spots Host Plants

    Prefers eastern white pine

  • Dusky Birch Sawfly Tenthredinidae

    Late instar larvae about 1”; black heads; yellowish green body with a row of large black spots down each side Host Plants

    Prefers gray birch but attacks other birches

    Blackheaded Ash Sawfly Tenthredinidae

    Late instar larvae about ¾”; black head and legs; white, hairless body Host Plants

    Prefers white and red ash but will attack other ashes

  • Curled Rose Sawfly

    Rose slug sawfly Coleoptera Curculionidae - Weevils

    Adults – snout varies in size; elbowed antennae arise mid length; mandibles at tip Larvae – “C” shaped, legless Most are phytophagous, adults may feed on foliage, bark of twigs; larvae feed on roots and crowns, bore into stems

    Black Vine Weevil Curculionidae

    Introduced weevil Adults – 3/8”; black with yellowish flecks Larvae – ½”; “C” shaped, legless Host Plants

    Wide host range of woody shrubs and herbaceous plants; prefers yews, rhododendron, astilbe, heuchera, bergenia

  • Two Banded Japanese Weevil Curculionidae

    Introduced weevil Adults – 3/16”; shortnosed, brown to gray with 2 dark bands, females only, flightless, diurnal Larvae – ¼”; “C” shaped, legless Host Plants

    Prefers privet, azalea, rhododendron, mountain laurel, forsythia, spirea, lilac, pyracantha, euonymus

    Strawberry Root Weevil Curculionidae

    Introduced weevil Adults – ¼”; shortnosed, shiny black, constricted prothorax / wing, nocturnal, flightless Larvae – ¼”; “C” shaped, legless Host Plants

    Prefers arborvitae, hemlock; some pines, spruce, and juniper attacked

  • Elm flea weevil

    European elm flea weevil (Orchestes alni) common throughout Europe and first found in the U.S. in 1982.

    Found in the Midwest in 2003, and in Minnesota until 2007.

    Feeds on Siberian elm, Chinese elm and hybrids with Asian parentage. Rarely feeds on American elm.

    Feeding damage only affects the appearance of the tree.

    Jeffrey Hahn, Extension entomologist

    Jeffrey Hahn, Extension entomologist

    Japanese Beetle Scarabaeidae

    • Introduced scarab beetle • Adults – ½”, broadly oval, thick bodied,

    brown wings, and metallic green body • Larvae – mature 1”, white with tan heads,

    “C” shaped • Host Plants

    – Adults have very wide host range (> 300 plant species); Prefers Linden trees, roses, grapes

  • • Labeled for use against Japanese beetle adults and grubs, leaf-feeding caterpillars, gypsy moth caterpillars, bagworms, tussock moth cat

Search related