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Introduction. Course Objectives Define the parts of the New Testament Canon and the principles of its formation. Apply hermeneutics to biblical passages

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  • Introduction
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  • Course Objectives Define the parts of the New Testament Canon and the principles of its formation. Apply hermeneutics to biblical passages and explain the importance of hermeneutics in avoiding interpretation errors. Reasons for reading and studying the New Testament and applying it to daily life.
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  • Course Objectives Define Gospel and concisely describe the relationship between Jesus Christ and the Gospel of Good News found in the New Testament. Describe the main themes found in the gospels, epistles, and Revelation. Recognize the cultural, religious, and other effects of the Greek society on the pre-Christian and Early Church world.
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  • Course Objectives Describe the theological significance and real world relevance of Jesus death on the cross for the entire world. Explain the relationship between New Testament believers and Old Testament teaching. Distinguish between Jesus first coming and His second coming from relevant scripture passages.
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  • What is the Bible?
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  • How do we know the right books are in the Bible?
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  • The Greek Kanon It had to be unbendable It had to be dependable as to its straightness KANWN
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  • Canonicity refers to the churchs recognition of the authority of the inspired writings.
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  • How was the Bible Written?
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  • All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work. (2 Timothy 3:16-17).
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  • Theopneustos
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  • All Scripture is inspired by God The Fact of Inspiration The Extent of Inspiration
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  • All Scripture is inspired by God The Fact of Inspiration The Extent of Inspiration The Object of Inspiration
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  • The Church was born with a completed Canon
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  • The Testimony of Josephus For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another [as the Greeks have], but only twenty-two books, which contain the records of all the past times; which are justly believed to be divine... (Contra Apion 1:8).
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  • The Testimony of Josephus It is true, our history has been written since Artaxerxes, very peculiarly, but has not been esteemed of the like authority with the former by our forefathers, because there has not been an exact succession of prophets since that time. (Contra Apion 1:8).
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  • The New Testament A Question of Apostolic Authority having been built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets (Ephesians 2:20)
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  • Can our copies of the Bible be trusted?
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  • Copy Original Manuscript Copy
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  • Fundamental Questions in Hermeneutics What did it mean to the original characters of the narrative? What did it mean to the author? What did it mean to the original recipients?
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  • Readers Today Original Author Original Readers Bible
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  • Fundamental Questions in Hermeneutics What did it mean to the original characters of the narrative? What did it mean to the author? What did it mean to the original recipients? What does it tell us about our understanding of the Old Testament?
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  • Caesarea Jerusalem Joppa (Modern Tel Aviv)
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  • Sea of Galilee Megiddo Nazareth
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  • Separating the Wheat from the Tares
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  • Sea of Galilee Megiddo Nazareth Tiberias Capernaum
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  • Jerusalem The City of God
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  • Caesarea Jerusalem Joppa (Modern Tel Aviv)
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  • Now there is in Jerusalem by the sheep gate a pool, which is called in Hebrew Bethesda, having five porticoes (John 5:2)
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  • In these lay a multitude of those who were sick, blind, lame, and withered (John 5:3)
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  • And a certain man was there, who had been thirty-eight years in his sickness. 6 When Jesus saw him lying there, and knew that he had already been a long time in that condition, He said to him, "Do you wish to get well?" (John 5:5-6)
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  • The sick man answered Him, "Sir, I have no man to put me into the pool when the water is stirred up, but while I am coming, another steps down before me." (John 5:7)
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  • Old Testament World Different geographical regions Different languages Different national invaders Different types of literature New Testament World
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  • What are some similarities between the Old and New Testaments? Both speak of a Covenant. Both are of a historical value. Both attest to Christ, the Messiah

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