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  • Dr Tammy Watchorn Head of Innovation and Design

    Innovation, Transformation, Change Management and Project Delivery

    Tools, Methods and Case Studies

  • Index of contents

    Innovation Process Steps

    Before you start Innovation Environment Check list

    Change types and associated leadership

    Design thinking

    Innovation Tools

    Case studies

    Creative problem solving

    Created a shared vision

    Creating ideas in collaboration

    Rapid protoyping through co-creation

    Developing leaders of the future

    Core methods in detail

    Video examples of methods to use

  • Innovation Steps: Methods, tools and training options within NSS

    a) Define problem

    statements

    b) Develop aligned vision

    of future

    c) Co-creation of ideas

    d) Identify / recruit skills &

    resources

    Methods: e.g. Creative Problem Solving, Serious Play, User Centred Design, Art of the Possible, Hackathons, QUBE RABBIT model

    Training: Leadership, innovation, user centred design

    e) Co-create development

    prototypes

    f) Identify partners/

    methods to develop

    g) Identify / recruit skills &

    resources

    h) Develop product in

    collaboration

    Methods: e.g. Open innovation, Civtec, QUBE, PI sprints

    Training: Design, Agile, Change types, leadership, change management

    i) Business case

    j)Procurement k)

    Engagement l) Scale up

    Methods: e.g. Innovation cluster, HIAP, Agile, QUBE

    Training: Agile, Change types, Leadership, change management

    Step 1

    Step 2

    Step 3

  • Innovation Checklist Creating the right environment for innovation

    Prof Eddie Obeng

  • Change Management – Identifying the right type of change

    Before starting a new change project you should first determine the type of change it is. This will help you to understand the best methods to use when managing change as not all project management tools are suited to all types of change

    You should want to think about the different types of leadership needed to manage this change and also ho the team might be feeling in relation to the change as we all have different preferences on our preferred change types. Someone who enjoys clarity on all aspects for example would not enjoy leading a foggy project

    Movie project: We know how but don’t know what. We may have a standard process for doing something but the outcome may change or be unpredictable (imagine clinical situations) and we need to have good process and review mechanisms in place to monitor the what as it emerges

    Fog: We don’t know what to do or how to do it but we know we can’t stay where we are. This might be a typical innovation project. We want to take small steps, quick actions and assess the next step Planning 2 years ahead for a foggy project is pointless. Aligning and collaborating around the short term actions will move us as a group much more effectively and quickly.

    Quest: We know what to do (seek out the holy grail) but don’t know HOW to do it (so we might send our knights out on a 3 month expedition with a limited budget, bring them back, find out what they learned, re-plan and then send them out again). Agile methods can work well for these projects, working on one user story at a time

    Paint by numbers: We know what to do and how to do it. PRINCE2 methodology works well for this, we can scope it out early and roughly know what to expect as the project progresses

    Know What

    Know How

    Don’t Know How

    Don’t Know What

    Types of Change

    Ref: Prof Eddie Obeng and Pentacle the VBS

  • Lego Serious Play for Design Thinking What is Design Thinking?

    Design Thinking (DT) is a discipline for creative problem

    solving, encouraging organizations to create human-centered

    products, services, and internal processes, therefore a key

    process for digital transformation.

    Adopting a full Design Thinking approach requires quite some

    time and numerous iterations. The condensed version of the

    DT process is the Design Thinking Sprint

    What is a design sprint?

    The sprint is a five-day process for answering critical business

    questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers.

    Developed at Google Ventures, it’s a “greatest hits” of business

    strategy, innovation, behaviour science, design thinking, and more—

    packaged into a battle-tested process that any team can use.

    Many of the techniques used in DT sprints rely

    heavily on making people move and use hands to

    pretotype ideas into tangible objects, with an

    underlying goal of keeping energy high. Yet,

    unless the facilitator is highly skilled, energy will

    be spent without being converted into a real

    outcome.

    LSP is also an energy optimizer because it

    preserves energy during moments of individual

    relaxing to invest it when it really matters, on the

    listening and converging phase.

    Converting energy into

    results In DT empathizing with

    your user means capturing human

    experiences and distilling many stories, emotions

    and touch-points into the single most important

    point of view.

    LSP is designed to make abstract concepts

    tangible. It is the perfect remedy for exploring

    human needs. It is like a magnifying glass to help

    zoom more clearly on what customers mean when using words like "being comfortable" or

    "feeling important" or "being afraid of", all

    topics that surface in human-centered

    approach.

    Capturing the intangible

    Sprint participants are called to switch between

    convergent and divergent modes of thinking

    multiple times during the same sprint, which can

    lead to a feeling of cognitive fatigue, a

    feeling that there are too many post-its, words,

    noise.

    LSP is a noise canceling device, as it helps

    participants to listen to each other. It is effective

    during customer interviews, in storytelling

    and elevator pitches.

    Cognitive Fatigue

    During a condensed sprint, there is a strong

    bias for action, and there is little time to dwell on

    discussion. Time pressure helps keep the

    ball rolling, but it is also a good excuse to jump

    ahead without too much depth

    . LSP blends speed and depth; it allows quality

    conversation about multiple elements of the same complex scenario

    without compromising between the details and

    the bigger picture.

    Lack of DepthWhy use LEGO Serious Play?

    The traditional Design

    Thinking Sprint uses brain-

    storming and consensus-

    building techniques relying on

    words and Post-It notes. But

    this technique often produces

    inconsistent results and has

    been criticized as an

    oversimplified version of a

    complex process. Through

    incorporating The LEGO

    SERIOUS PLAY methodology

    (LSP) in Sprint design

    overcomes four major

    challenges facing traditional

    Design Thinking Sprint

    workshops:

    www.rasmusssenconsulting.dk.

    http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001oneehRvMXjE3UPBA_i-xTHraPNXHm97ZbqcvCH4wkUQuzm7Krq5SGOVHP-NWCtjxxmF-UwHoHhKHNIf9PnOG5-D4myxCBKoi6BM4h-ZVzkzU8Zs6_s_SDYaDYFtSmyiSS40ErR-BxUHx2AodzZTWpJQQZNwMByuOioLdTM4otzwKg9-zT2lBYQ==&c=lcdWRPUzJkrqrK4KN_ihZY2cOLIRgs1eBmIWVH3j-D-NkeBvwoUxlg==&ch=XdEoJPGQRZbu5gM3NVT5ARVu2z27bZAp81o1C1CaFJFpNHdC_D-6SA==

  • Innovation Steps - Video Examples of Methods and When to Use

    a) Define problem

    statements

    b) Develop aligned vision

    of future

    c) Co-creation of ideas

    d) Identify / recruit skills &

    resources

    e) Co-create development

    prototypes

    f) Identify partners/

    methods to develop

    g) Identify / recruit skills &

    resources

    h) Develop product in

    collaboration i) Business case j)Procurement k) Engagement l) Scale up

    QUBE Virtual Working (a-i, k, l)

    Human Centred Design (c,e,f,h)

    Leadership & training (a-l)

    Creative Problem Solving (a,c)

    Lego Serious Play (b,c,e) Hackathons (c)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_nErLZ30pA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIAXg6YytbI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxmCQHLExfs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pFNpnl9I4Q https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=musmgKEPY2o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgxhoHlntPo&t=2s

  • Case study 1

    Defining problem statements

    How might we ensure we’re trying to solve the right problems?

    How often do we say “if only we could…” or “if only they would”?

    How many of us think we have the answers to those big issues like the NHS, council budgets etc?

    But if the answers were so easy they would have been fixed by now

    So either the solution is much more complicated than we think (and we need a different solution) OR We’re tackling the wrong problems.

    Creative problem solving (CPS) exercises focus us on working out what all of the problems and challenges might be to help us work out which problem statements might

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