Hospitals as a microcosm of global learning: spaces of learning and the geriatric specialty Parvati Raghuram, Leroi Henry, Joanna Bornat The Open University.

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    21-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Hospitals as a microcosm of global learning: spaces of learning and the geriatric specialty Parvati Raghuram, Leroi Henry, Joanna Bornat The Open University ESRC RES-062-23-0514 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Spaces of Learning Spatial arrangements as the problem Spatial reconfiguration as part of the learning process </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Our project Two year ESRC funded project to undertake oral history interviews with working and retired geriatricians trained in South Asia in order to explore their experiences and contribution to the development of the care of older people in the UK. http://www.open.ac.uk/hsc/research/research- projects/geriatric-medicine/home.php </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Methods 60 oral history interviews with retired and serving geriatricians 32 Completed Margot Jeffreys data set: 40 or so interviews with retired and serving geriatricians </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Selection of informants Primarily recruited through British Geriatrics Society: Invitation letters Newsletter Personal contacts Searches of hospital and other websites Snowballing </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Older peoples care the spatial problem Spaces of older peoples care: Older peoples care and learning spaces </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Spatial rearrangements as learning Rearranging space Beds Wards Hospitals Creating learning spaces Teaching Institutionalising Disseminating </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Global microcosm Dissemination to new centres Postcolonial spatial relations and spaces of learning </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Conclusions In discussing spaces for learning, neither these spaces nor the learning should be presumed. They are contingent. They draw on histories of previous arrangements, whether it be postcolonial relations that influenced who came to study medicine in the UK or what hospitals were deemed fit for teaching. Residual social and political relations can influence spaces of learning New spaces of learning can however emerge. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Conclusions (continued) The subject of learning and its content can itself be spatial so that learning can become defined as spatial rearrangements Certain spatial arrangements become institutionalised and the places where they are propagated become seen as centres of learning. Learning is defined as passing through these spaces. But these centres also become reified through people passing through them and spreading these new spatial practices to other places. In sum, neither spaces nor learning should be fixed. They both change together </li> </ul>

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