HETA 95-0311-2593 Martin’s Carstar, Inc. Lakewood, Colorado HETA 95-0311-2593 Martin’s Carstar,

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  • HETA 95-0311-2593 Martin’s Carstar, Inc. Lakewood, Colorado

    Charles McCammon

    This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

    This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

    This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

    This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved.

    This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

    applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports

  • ii

    PREFACE The Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch of NIOSH conducts field investigations of possible health hazards in the workplace. These investigations are conducted under the authority of Section 20(a)(6) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, 29 U.S.C. 669(a)(6) which authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services, following a written request from any employer or authorized representative of employees, to determine whether any substance normally found in the place of employment has potentially toxic effects in such concentrations as used or found.

    The Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch also provides, upon request, technical and consultative assistance to Federal, State, and local agencies; labor; industry; and other groups or individuals to control occupational health hazards and to prevent related trauma and disease. Mention of company names or products does not constitute endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND AVAILABILITY OF REPORT This report was prepared by Charles McCammon, of the NIOSH Denver Field Office, Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies (DSHEFS). Field assistance was provided by Bambi L. Sorensen and Robb Menzies. Desktop publishing by Pat Lovell.

    Copies of this report have been sent to employee and management representatives at Martin’s and the OSHA Regional Office. This report is not copyrighted and may be freely reproduced. Single copies of this report will be available for a period of three years from the date of this report. To expedite your request, include a self-addressed mailing label along with your written request to:

    NIOSH Publications Office 4676 Columbia Parkway Cincinnati, Ohio 45226

    800-356-4674

    After this time, copies may be purchased from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) at 5825 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161. Information regarding the NTIS stock number may be obtained from the NIOSH Publications Office at the Cincinnati address.

    For the purpose of informing affected employees, copies of this report shall be posted by the employer in a prominent place accessible to the employees for a period of 30 calendar days.

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    Health Hazard Evaluation Report 95-0311-2593 Martin’s Carstar, Inc. Lakewood, Colorado

    August 1996

    Charles McCammon

    SUMMARY On June 24, 1995, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the President of Martin’s Carstar in Lakewood, Colorado, for help in assessing worker exposure to isocyanates during spray painting of automobiles. Martin’s Carstar is an autobody repair shop whose other concerns for worker exposure included solvents, total dusts, noise, carbon monoxide (CO), and metals. An initial survey was conducted in August 1995 and an interim report was issued in December 1995. To assess effects of seasonal variation, a second survey was conducted on March 8, 1996. This report summarizes the exposures from both surveys.

    Activities in the repair shop include frame straightening, panel repair/replacement, body filling, and final painting and detailing. Martin’s uses the BASF Corp. Glasurit isocyanate catalyzed paints. In general, the paints are composed of a base coat, a reducer, and a hardener. The percentage and make-up of each component varies depending on the type of paint, i.e., a base coat, a color coat, or a top (clear) coat. The paints contain hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI) polymer and very small amounts of the monomer (

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    level was 450 ppm and the highest 15-minute average was 105 ppm. The high peaks were associated with moving vehicles in and out of the shop. A personal noise monitor was placed on a body repair worker. The average noise level (using the OSHA criteria) was 79 dBA, resulting in a 21% dose of the maximum allowable noise exposure (projected to 28% for a full 8 hours). The maximum peak level measured was 115 dBA. Using a 3 dB exchange rate (NIOSH criteria), the dose percent was 78% with a projected 8-hr dose of 106%. One PBZ welding sample was collected. Exposures to all metals were well below the respective evaluation criteria.

    A potential health hazard exists from exposure to peak levels of carbon monoxide during the cold weather months. Levels of isocyanates, solvents, total dust, and noise were below respective evaluation criteria. Area levels of total dust in the spray booths were above the OSHA PEL but workers were wearing either dust/mist/organics cartridge air-purifying or air-supplied respirators. The use of air-purifying respirators was deemed sufficient for the exposures documented. Recommendations are presented for control of exposures to CO and to help reduce other exposures.

    Keywords: SIC 7531(automotive body shops), isocyanates, solvents, total dust, carbon monoxide, noise, respirators

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

    Acknowledgments and Availability of Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

    Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Isocyanates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Total Dust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Organics (solvents) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Carbon Monoxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    Evaluation Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Carbon Monoxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Organic Solvents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Isocyanates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

    Diisocyanate-induced sensitization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Prevention and treatment . .