Gold Coast Dyslexia Support Group Phonics - Synthetic and Systematic Gold Coast Dyslexia Support Group

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  • Fact Sheet 1 What is Dyslexia? gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    What is Dyslexia?

    Dyslexia means ‘difficulty with words’

    Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that affects a child’s ability to develop a

    strong understanding of language.

    The child that seems bright and capable yet struggles with reading,

    writing, and spelling.

    Children have difficulty hearing the sounds in words and converting from

    sound to symbol and symbol to sound.

    Dyslexia may affect one out of five children in each class (10-20%)

    The brain of a person with dyslexia works SIX times harder when reading.

    How do children with dyslexia

    learn?

    Multi- sensory

    Techniques

    Direct and Explicit

    Instruction

    Evidence Based

    Reading Methods

    Phonics - Synthetic

    and Systematic

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

  • Fact Sheet 2 Strengths of Dyslexia gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    Individuals with Dyslexia can excel in the following areas:

    Cognitive Strengths of Dyslexia

    Inquiring Mind

    Problem Solving

    Creative Thinking

    3D Construction

    Generating New Ideas

    Finding Different Strategies

    Analytical Thinking

    Insightful Thinking

    Seeing the ‘BIG’ picture

    Computer Science

    Business

    Architecture

    Design

    EngineeringArt

    Music

    Sport

    Science

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

  • Fact Sheet 3 Impact of Dyslexia gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    Unidentified dyslexia may cause classroom behaviour problems:

     Difficulty follow instructions

     Work not completed and avoiding work

     Easily distracted and daydreaming

     Withdrawn and reluctant to participate in class

     Disruptive behaviour to conceal their learning difficulty

     Outbursts to express anger and frustration

     Tiredness, exhaustion and irritability

     Avoiding school and truancy

    Oral

    Language Written

    Language

    Working Memory

    Executive Function

    Attention Motor Skills

    Mathematics

    Reading

    Writing

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

    Dyslexia can

    impact on the

    following

    areas of

    learning

  • Teacher Checklist - Indicators of Dyslexia

    The child that seems bright and capable yet struggles with reading, writing, and spelling.

    □ Oral language skills are often stronger than written language skills

    □ Difficulty pronouncing sounds in words

    □ Problems with phonological awareness – difficulty segmenting, blending and manipulating the sounds (phonemes) and syllables in words

    □ Confusion with ‘direction’ words of space or time – left/right, up/down, yesterday/tomorrow

    □ Very slow in acquiring reading skills

    □ Limited reading fluency – oral reading is slow and laboured with many mistakes

    □ Poor sight word recognition and difficulty remembering familiar words

    □ Stumbles when reading longer words and may rely on phonics to sound out words

    □ Poor spelling skills and often spells words phonetically

    □ May reverse letters or the order of letters/numbers when reading and writing (visual perception problems) ‘b’ and ‘d’ , ‘was’ and ‘saw', ‘from’ and ‘form’

    □ Limited reading comprehension due to reading processing difficulties

    □ Poor rote memory –trouble learning the alphabet and letter sounds, multiplication tables

    □ Difficulty with sequencing information and following complex instructions

    □ Avoids reading and writing whenever possible – especially fearful of reading aloud

    □ Slow to complete reading and writing tasks

    □ Difficulty copying written work – slow and written work is untidy with many errors

    □ Written responses are less detailed than their actual knowledge

    □ Complaining that letters and words on the page move or become blurred

    □ Complaining of dizziness or headaches while reading but eyesight is fine

    □ Easily distracted by visual or auditory stimuli and appears to lack concentration

    □ Inconsistent school work and a downward trend in academic achievement

  • Parent Checklist - Indicators of Dyslexia

    □ Delayed speech and troubles pronouncing sounds to learn new words

    □ Mixes up familiar words when speaking – ‘pootfrints’ instead of ‘footprints’

    □ Difficulty making connections between letters and their sounds

    □ Confusion with words of space or time – left/right, up/down, yesterday/tomorrow

    □ Struggles following more than one instruction at a time

    □ Problems with remembering things in correct sequence or order

    □ Difficulty with rote learning – alphabet, times tables, telling time, days of the week

    □ Oral language skills are stronger than written language skills

    □ Trouble learning frequently used ‘sight’ words and continually fails to recognise familiar

    words

    □ May reverse letters (‘b’ and ‘d’ )or the order of letters (‘was’ and ‘saw') when reading and

    writing – this is common in young children (6-7 years) but should not continue

    □ Rely heavily on pictures in readers and books

    □ Complains of difficulty ‘seeing’ words and headaches when reading but eyesight is fine

    □ Oral reading is slow and laboured – the child may skip words, mix up or jumble words and

    wildly guess unfamiliar words

    □ Trouble with understanding what they have read but good comprehension when read to

    □ Poor spelling skills and often spells words as they sound rather than correctly

    □ Messy handwriting - writes slowly and often awkwardly

    □ Written work is untidy with many errors and crossing out

    □ Avoids writing tasks or writes very little

    □ Easily distracted and may not concentrate when completing homework

    □ Doesn’t enjoy going to school

    □ Often comes home from school exhausted, stressed and disagreeable

    □ May have good days or very bad days at school

    □ Has an immediate family member who had difficulty learning to read, write or spell

  • Fact Sheet 4 Indicators of Dyslexia gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    Key Indicators of Dyslexia

    Late to learn to talk and prefers non-verbal gestures

    Mixes up and mispronounces words in speech

    Difficulty remembering nursery rhymes and playing word games

    Confusion with space and time

    Slow to learn the alphabet letter names and their sounds

    Poor verbal memory - struggles to follow complex instructions

    Strong oral language skills

    Excellent social skills

    Reading is slow and laboured - reads word by word with little

    expression, stumbles when sounding out unfamiliar words,

    words read incorrectly, guesses unknown words, relies on

    pictures for information, unable to recognise common words by

    sight and depends on context to figure out unfamiliar words.

    Reading is hard work and requires a lot of effort

    Poor spelling skills and spells phonetically

    Good comprehension when read to

    Handwriting is messy, disorganised and untidy

    May avoid writing or write the bare minimum in tasks

    Written work does not reflect their oral language ability

    Difficulty with rote learning such as times tables

    Requires more time to finish tasks and struggles to keep up

    with the workload

    Easily distracted and may not appear to concentrate

    Strengths in art, music, sport, maths, science, computers,

    design or mechanics

    Over time their self esteem and confidence decreases.....

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

  • Fact Sheet 5 Causes of Dyslexia gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    What Causes Dyslexia?

    Inheritance

    Dyslexia is genetic. Several specific genes have been identified that

    influence brain development and can cause a predisposition to dyslexia.

    Studies have indicated that if a child has a parent or older sibling with

    dyslexia, there is a strong chance that the child will also have difficulty in

    learning to read.

    Neurology

    Dyslexia is caused by a difference in the way the brain processes

    information and for this reason, children with dyslexia learn differently.

    Reading requires the activation of several areas of the brain.

    Brain imagery studies show most people use three distinct regions on the

    left side of their brain when reading.

    A person with dyslexia uses secondary pathways on the right side of their

    brain to read and write.

    Excellent remedial instruction can re-wire the brain of a dyslexic child by

    strengthening the secondary pathways and by activating the rear occipital

    region of the brain.

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

  • Fact Sheet Books on Dyslexia gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    Useful Books on Dyslexia

    Gold Coast Dyslexia

    Support Group

  • Fact Sheet 7 Phonological Awareness gcdyslexia@gmail.com

    Phonological