Glacier Monitoring

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Glacier Monitoring. Justification. Integrate weather, hydrology, landscapes, provide visitor opportunities “raison d’etre ” “Determine changes in glacial extent and configuration of selected glaciers in GLBA and KLGO .”. Alaska NPS Glacier Inventory and Change Assessment. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring ProgramGlacier Monitoring1JustificationIntegrate weather, hydrology, landscapes, provide visitor opportunitiesraison detreDetermine changes in glacial extent and configuration of selected glaciers in GLBA and KLGO.

Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program

2Alaska NPS Glacier Inventory and Change AssessmentMap change in areal extent in the 1950s and 2000sEstimate volume changes over various time periods (~1995 2011)More thoroughly characterize 1-3 focus glaciers per parkSoutheast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program3Areal ExtentAnthony Arendt - UAFGlaciation in GLBA diminished 11% (from 53.5 to 48.4%) between 1952 and 2010Datasets describing physical characteristics of each glacier are in development (length, width, slope, area, elevation).Methods: image processing, digitizing, and watershed modelingSoutheast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program4Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program

5Opening Bullet

Bullet 2 and 3Knowing the condition of natural resources in national parks is essential to the NPSs mission Park managers know that decision-making related to protecting ecosystems is complex. We need relevant, up-to-date information to understand how the condition of park resources is changing over time in response to natural processes and human activities.

At the most basic level, we cannot evaluate appropriate ecosystem function, assess impairment, or develop an appropriate management responses when the bounds of natural variability are not known, because we cannot identify when conditions are outside an expected range of variation. Similarly, without the fundamental perspective, reliable identification of resource trends is difficult.

No single spatial or temporal scale is appropriate for all system components and processes

the appropriate scale for understanding and effectively managing a particular resource will likely vary with the subject resource, and in some cases may require a regional, national, or international effort to understand and effectively manage. National parks themselves are part of larger ecosystems and must be managed in that context.

Volume ChangeChris Larsen - UAFFound negative glacier-wide mass balance rates with 5 exceptions.Thinning was greatest on Grand Pacific 2001-2009 (1.99 m/yr)Methods: existing altimetry profiles extrapolated glacier-wide using best available DEMWill project to additional glaciers beyond those directly measuredSoutheast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program6What were learningSoutheast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program

2000-20052000-2009Volume change by elevationFocus Glaciers

Brady Remote tidewater with very low-elev accum. zoneMargerieCruise-ship visible, tidewater, high-elev accum. zoneMuirFormerly tidewater with spectacular retreat historyNourseOutside park, moraine-dammed threatens infrastructure

Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program8What were learning Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring ProgramAbility to tell a more complete storyDrawing multiple partners together

9Southeast Alaska NetworkInventory and Monitoring Program May 6, 2009christopher_sergeant@nps.gov 364.1591

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