of 97 /97
© 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Important Notices and Privacy Statement. © 2011 NetApp, Inc. All rights reserved. Specifications subject to change without notice. Page 1 of 97 Cisco/NetApp Data Center Solutions FLEXPOD DEMONSTRATION SCRIPT VERSION 1.0 October 2011 Marcos Hernandez Data Center Solutions Architect, CCIE#8283 Cisco Systems, Inc.

FlexPod Demo Script

Embed Size (px)

Text of FlexPod Demo Script

Cisco/NetApp Data Center Solutions FLEXPOD DEMONSTRATION SCRIPT VERSION 1.0

October 2011Marcos Hernandez Data Center Solutions Architect, CCIE#8283 Cisco Systems, Inc.

2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Important Notices and Privacy Statement. 2011 NetApp, Inc. All rights reserved. Specifications subject to change without notice. Page 1 of 97

ATTENTIONWe strongly recommend that you go through this process at least once, before presenting in front of a live audience. This will allow you to become familiar with the structure of the document, the time it takes to load the environment and the general cadence of the demonstrations. PREPARATION IS KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL CUSTOMER PRESENTATION. Several tasks described in this document require that you start them ahead of time, in order to arrive to a specific desired state and maximize the objectives of the demonstration. They are clearly identified at the beginning of each section. If you decide to conduct these demonstrations without preparing the environment beforehand, ensure that your allotted time is long enough to accommodate the aforementioned activities and that your audience understands the reasons behind your decision. This demonstration script is a living document. As more capabilities are added, this script will be updated with demonstrations for those added features. Check the FlexPod Partners website at www.cisco.com/go/flexpod for updates to this script.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 2 of 97

CONTENTSINTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 5

Demonstration Script Style ...............................................................................................................................................5 Demonstration Scripts Key ...............................................................................................................................................5 Demonstration Scripts Focus............................................................................................................................................6 References and Sources ......................................................................................................................................................6 Main Features .........................................................................................................................................................................7

SOLUTION OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................................ 7 UNDERSTANDING THE CUSTOMER.................................................................................................................... 8

Key Messages for Key Players ..........................................................................................................................................8 Key Messages for the Chief Information Officers (CIO) ...................................................................................................... 8 Key Messages for VP of Operations and Directors of IT Infrastructure ....................................................................... 8 Key Messages for Infrastructure Architects ............................................................................................................................ 8 Key Messages for System Integrators ........................................................................................................................................ 9 Key Messages for Account Managers .......................................................................................................................................... 9 Key Messages for Systems Engineers ......................................................................................................................................... 9 IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords ................................................................................................................. 11 UCS Server Assignment .................................................................................................................................................... 11 Lab vFiler Assignment ...................................................................................................................................................... 11

NETWORK DIAGRAM, IP ADDRESSES, USERS AND PASSWORDS .......................................................... 10

ACCESSING YOUR POD ......................................................................................................................................... 12Guidelines ............................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Cisco and NetApp Partner Programs .......................................................................................................................... 12 1. Demonstrating Rapid Deployment, Scaling and Virtual Desktop Lifecycle Management .................. 13 2. Simple Administration and Management ............................................................................................................. 13 3. Uncompromised End User Experience .................................................................................................................. 13 4. Reducing Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) ............................................................................................................. 14 5. Security and Compliance ............................................................................................................................................ 14

QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE.................................................................................................................................. 13

DEMONSTRATIONS .............................................................................................................................................. 151. Demonstrating Rapid Deployment, Scaling and Virtual Desktop Lifecycle Management .................. 15 1.1 UCS Manager and Service Profiles ......................................................................................................................................15 1.2 Provisioning a New Blade Server from a Service Template ....................................................................................20 1.3 Provisioning Virtual Desktops using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) ...........................................................24 1.4 Provisioning New Storage Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) ...................................................................27 1.5 Storage Resizing Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) ......................................................................................34 2. Simple System Administration and Management ............................................................................................. 37 2.1 Server and Chassis Administration with UCS Manager .............................................................................................37 2.2 Network Visibility with Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) .........................................................................39 3. Uncompromised End User Experience .................................................................................................................. 42 3.1 Network Persistence after a vMotion Event...................................................................................................................42

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 3 of 97

3.2 NetApp Flash Cache ..................................................................................................................................................................47 3.3 Desktop Re-deployment Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC).......................................................................58 4. Reducing Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) ............................................................................................................. 62 4.1 Storage Deduplication .............................................................................................................................................................62 4.2 FlexPod Scalability Server and Chassis .........................................................................................................................69 5. Security and Compliance ............................................................................................................................................ 73 5.1 Nexus 1000v Port Profiles .....................................................................................................................................................73 5.2 Role Based Access Control (RBAC) with UCS Manager..............................................................................................77 5.3 Storage Virtualization: vFilers and IP Spaces NetApp Multistore......................................................................80

CLOSING REMARKS AND RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................................................................... 85 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES .................................................................................................................................. 86 WHERE TO GO FOR HELP ................................................................................................................................... 88 APPENDIX A FACTS AND ADDITIONAL TALKING POINTS ................................................................... 89IDC White Paper: Accelerating Converged Infrastructure with the FlexPod Datacenter Solution ...... 89 The Success of UCS ............................................................................................................................................................. 89 The Success of NetApp...................................................................................................................................................... 90 The Success of the Nexus Product Family ................................................................................................................. 92 Your Own Story Here ........................................................................................................................................................ 92

APPENDIX B - TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS ...................................................................................................... 93Labgear access: Unable to access the Labgear site ................................................................................................ 93 Labgear access: RDP session will not launch ........................................................................................................... 93 vCenter: Virtual Machine Console returns a black/blank screen .................................................................... 93 Virtual Storage Console (VSC): Launching some VSC menus returns a blank screen................................ 93 NetApp Management Console (NMC): NMC actions are very sluggish ............................................................ 93 NetApp Management Console (NMC): Unable to create a vFiler ....................................................................... 93 Data Center Network Manager (DCNM): Unable to connect to DCNM LAN Server ..................................... 93 Using Infrastructure VM Snaphots............................................................................................................................... 93 High Level Topology.......................................................................................................................................................... 94 Software Packages and Software Versions ............................................................................................................... 95 Deployment Instructions ................................................................................................................................................ 96

APPENDIX C BUILDING YOUR OWN DEMO INFRASTRUCTURE .......................................................... 94

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 4 of 97

INTRODUCTIONWelcome to the Cisco FlexPod Demonstration Script version 1.0. This script is intended to provide you with everything you need to demonstrate a wide range of solution features to a variety of potential customers. At the same time, the script will help you illustrate the business benefits provided by the FlexPod Solution. The demonstrations are designed to focus on achieving: Customer awareness of what the solution can do for them. Customer understanding of why the Cisco solution is unique and an improvement over the status quo or competitive solutions. Customer introduction to the deployment process of the demonstrated solution. The FlexPod demonstration should go beyond the topics of interest to the technical decision maker (TDM) and should appeal to the business decision maker (BDM) by focusing on the benefits that this solution provides. The Quick Reference Guide section provides general positioning and primary marketing messages, as well as a guide to which demonstrations will work together to show the benefits for a particular person in the workplace. As always, you will want to tailor your sales presentation to address specific audience needs or issues.

Demonstration Script StyleThe demonstration scripts are organized by task; they include important marketing messages as well as product and feature overviews and demonstration instructions. Using the Quick Reference Guide, you will be able to quickly tailor demonstrations for different customers, while communicating the benefits of each one to facilitate product sales.

Demonstration Scripts KeyThe following is a description of the conventions, colors and notation used through this document: STEP 1. Numbered instructions must be implemented in the order shown. Sections with this background color and this icon touch on the business benefits of the demo task with items and talking points highlighting the value proposition of the Solution. Sections with this background color and this icon cover the technical description of the demo task, with items and talking points of interest to technical audiences. Sections with this background color and this icon are for scenario description, fictitious situation to help illustrate the capabilities and benefits being discussed. Sections with this background color and this icon represent a warning; read this section for special instructions and considerations.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 5 of 97

Demonstration Scripts FocusThis demonstration script focuses on highlighting the FlexPod value proposition, in the context of a Virtual Desktop (VD) deployment. This value proposition rests on four critical pillars: Rapid deployment, scaling, and lifecycle management of virtual desktops. A uncompromised administration and end user experience. Control and reduction of desktop total cost of ownership (TCO). Exceptional control, compliance, and security of diverse endpoint environments.

This demonstration does not cover every single capability that our Solution supports. Instead, the focus is on those features that more clearly illustrate the business benefits and unique differentiators of the FlexPod architecture. This demonstration script is a living document. As more capabilities are added, this script will be updated with demonstrations for those added features. Check the FlexPod Partners website at www.cisco.com/go/flexpod for updates to this script.

References and SourcesThe following sources served as aid in the development of this document: FlexPod for VMware Cisco Validated Designs (CVDs): o http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/solutions/Enterprise/Data_Center/Virtualization/flexpod_v mware.html Unified Computing System (UCS) demonstration resources: o communities.cisco.com/docs/DOC-23693 UCS Cisco.com documentation: o www.cisco.com/go/ucs NetApp Data ONTAP documentation and collateral: o www.netapp.com Cisco Blogs (thanks to my colleagues, Kalpana Ettenson and Sean McGee):

o o

www.mseanmcgee.com blogs.cisco.com/category/channels

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 6 of 97

SOLUTION OVERVIEWFlexPod is a predesigned, base configuration that is built on Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS), Cisco Nexus data center switches, NetApp FAS storage components and a range of software partners. FlexPod can scale up for greater performance and capacity, or it can scale out for environments that need consistent, multiple deployments. FlexPod is a baseline configuration, but also has the flexibility to be sized and optimized to accommodate many different use cases including application workloads such as MS SQL Server, Exchange 2010, MS SharePoint, Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VMware View), Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (Citrix) or Secure Multi-tenancy (SMT) environments. FlexPod Benefits include: Low-risk standardized shared infrastructure supporting a wide range of environments. Highest possible data center efficiency. IT flexibility, providing business agility: scale out or up, but manage resource pools.

Main Features Complete data center in a single rack. Performance-matched stack. Step-by-step deployment guides. Solutions guide for multiple environments. Multiple classes of computing and storage supported in a single FlexPod. Centralized management: NetApp OnCommand and Cisco UCS Manager.

FlexPod for VMware is a reference Bill of Materials that leverages the best practices and methodologies that have already been developed for the Enhanced SMT architecture, and it is packaged with a set of standardized configurations that can be used as the base configuration for an SMT deployment (in addition to a wide range of workload environments). SMT capabilities such as load isolation, security zones, and array based backup and DR can be built on top of the FlexPod for use in private or public cloud environments. In addition, application workloads can be layered on top of the Secure Multitenancy features. Cisco Virtual Experience Infrastructure (VXI) delivers a complete, server-hosted, virtualized collaborative workspace infrastructure that helps IT improve administrative control and data security and more rapidly deploy and scale virtual desktops. VXI provides a near-native end-user computing experience and eases the migration to newer desktop operating systems while helping IT control operating expenses (OpEx) and capital expenditures (CapEx). For additional information about FlexPod and associated solutions, you can visit: www.cisco.com/go/flexpod

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 7 of 97

UNDERSTANDING THE CUSTOMERIndustry trends indicate a vast data center transformation toward shared infrastructures. Enterprise customers are moving away from silos of information and moving toward common infrastructures, virtualized environments, and cloud computing to increase agility and reduce costs. This transformation appears daunting and complex because companies must address both organizational and technical resistance to this new IT model. Cisco, NetApp, and VMware have developed FlexPod to address these virtualization needs and to simplify the evolution to shared and cloud infrastructures. When demonstrating FlexPod, a thorough understanding of your customer needs is essential. You have to prepare before hand and learn which solution benefits will resonate best with your target audience. This will increase the chances of success and will demonstrate this joint solutions innovation and technology is also a business enabler that can help your customers organization be more responsive, efficient and lean. As a guide, we provide a list of key messages that you will want to highlight depending on your intended audience:

Key Messages for Key PlayersKey Messages for the Chief Information Officers (CIO) Accelerate business delivery with flexible IT. Reduce TCO with higher data center efficiency by decreasing the number of operational processes, reducing energy consumption, and maximizing resources. Reduce risk with pre-validated infrastructure stack. Cooperative support and ecosystem of industry-leading partners.

Key Messages for VP of Operations and Directors of IT Infrastructure One platform for all sites, all applications, all security zones; one set of operational skills and processes. Proven configuration, repeatable approach. Right-sized for your business: NetApp FAS, plus Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS) blades provide consistency with known power, floor space, capacity.

Key Messages for Infrastructure Architects Infrastructure pools with centralized management. Application integration and wide feature support. Extended management. Proven validated architecture. Easy and secure Multi-tenancy.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 8 of 97

Key Messages for System Integrators Partner friendly, no compete, authorized partners. Pre-validated, simple deployment. FlexPod Sales Desk: Presales single number opportunity tracking and presales technical call routing. System Integrator value-add through migration, evolution, applications, processes, onsite management.

Key Messages for Account Managers Sell executive message about reducing cost, time, and risk. Sell IT management about right- sizing the blocks. Tight management integration with IT Service Management (ITSM) vendors, with more features and functionality to be added over time.

Key Messages for Systems Engineers One shared vision of unified compute, network, and storage. Virtualized at all layers for consolidation and agility. The best-integrated architecture for server virtualization.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 9 of 97

NETWORK DIAGRAM, IP ADDRESSES, USERS AND PASSWORDSThe following picture shows a simplified topology of the end-to-end Demo connectivity:

The preferred and easiest way to connect is by using the Labgear web interface, which launches a Remote Desktop Session from within a web browser located on your own computer. The detailed process can be obtained from the Accessing your POD section. If you need information about Remote Desktop Client, please visit the following link.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 10 of 97

IP Addresses, Usernames and PasswordsHere is a summary of the IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords that will be used in this demonstration: Device UCS Manager VMware vCenter Nexus 1000V VSM Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) NetApp vFiler Data Fabric Manager Data Fabric Manager (Simulator) Device Management PC UCS Manager (UCSM) UCSM READ-ONLY VMware vCenter Nexus 1000V VSM Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) NetApp vFiler Data Fabric Manager Data Fabric Manager (Simulator) IP address 10.1.10.110 10.1.111.19 10.1.111.17 10.1.111.130 10.1.219.151 (POD 1) 10.1.229.151 (POD 2) 10.1.10.39 10.1.111.151 Username Administrator flexdemoadminx, where x is your POD number (1 or 2) flexdemouser Administrator admin Administrator root flexdemouser Administrator Access Mechanism Web/Java Client vSphere Client PuTTY SSH Client DCNM LAN Client PuTTY SSH Client NetApp Management Console (NMC) NetApp Management Console (NMC) Password 1234Qwer 1234Qwer 1234Qwer 1234Qwer 1234Qwer 1234Qwer 1234Qwerty 1234Qwer 1234Qwer

UCS Server AssignmentUpon reserving your demonstration time slot, a server will be assigned to you. For POD 1, the server number is 8 and for POD 2 the server number is 7.

Lab vFiler AssignmentUpon reserving your demonstration time slot, a vFiler will be assigned to you. For POD 1, the vFiler name is lab-vfiler9 and for POD 2 the vFiler name lab-vfiler19.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 11 of 97

ACCESSING YOUR PODIf you are using Labgear, you will use the Labgear scheduling interface to reserve and login to your demo. To access the Demo Labs, follow these steps described on: http://dcv-labs.labgear.net The Demo/Lab Program overview can be found on: http://dcv-labs.labgear.net/ProgramOverview.asp

Guidelines It is recommended that you reserve your time slot at least 24 hrs. before the actual customer demonstration. Time slots are allotted in 4 hr. blocks, which should give you enough time to access and test the demonstration POD. This Demo Program is open to ALL registered Cisco Channel Resellers and Technology Partners.

Cisco and NetApp Partner ProgramsFor instructions on how to become a registered Cisco Partner, please visit: www.cisco.com/go/partner For instructions on how to become a NetApp Partner, please visit: www.netapp.com/us/partners/become-a-partner/become-a-partner.html

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 12 of 97

QUICK REFERENCE GUIDEThe demonstrations are arranged in the script by application, but using the hyperlinks below you can easily jump to demonstrations for each one simply click on the hyperlink.

1. Demonstrating Rapid Deployment, Scaling and Virtual Desktop Lifecycle ManagementThis section shows how easy it is to provision new users in the environment, including Virtual Desktops, storage, computing resources and network connectivity. A comparison between this process and a traditional deployment is also shown. Demonstration Task UCS Manager and Service Profiles Provisioning a new blade server from a Service Template Provisioning virtual desktops using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) Provisioning new storage using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) Storage re-sizing using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) Estimated Duration 5 min 5 min 5 min 5 min 5 min

2. Simple Administration and ManagementThis section shows how FlexPod, its components and features, provide the tools to guarantee an unmatched administration experience for the IT professionals in charge of the infrastructure. Demonstration Task Server and Chassis Administration with UCSM Network visibility with Cisco Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) Estimated Duration 5 min 5 min

3. Uncompromised End User ExperienceThis section shows how FlexPod, its components and features, provide the tools to guarantee a positive application experience for end users. Demonstration Task Network persistence after a vMotion event NetApp Flash Cache Desktop re-deployment using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) Estimated Duration 5 min 10-15 min 5 min

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 13 of 97

4. Reducing Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)This section covers several features that demonstrate how the shared IT infrastructure at the core of FlexPod helps you to maximize efficiency and decrease costs through optimized asset utilization. Demonstration Task Storage deduplication FlexPod Scalability - Server and chassis Estimated Duration 5 min 5 min

5. Security and ComplianceThis section illustrates how the FlexPod architecture offers network and application segregation capabilities that deliver the security and efficiency of a shared IT infrastructure, enabling isolated landscapes for a variety of use cases. Demonstration Task Nexus 1000V Port Profiles and VN-Link UCSM Role Based Access Control (RBAC) Storage virtualization: vFilers and IP Spaces Estimated Duration 5 min 5 min 5 min

Total Demonstration Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 14 of 97

DEMONSTRATIONS1. Demonstrating Rapid Deployment, Scaling and Virtual Desktop Lifecycle ManagementThis section shows how easy it is to provision new users in the environment, including Virtual Desktops, storage, computing resources and network connectivity. A comparison between this process and a traditional deployment is also shown.

DID YOU KNOW? In a Forrester study commissioned by Cisco, organizations interviewed were able to reduce 50% of the time allocated to repetitive management tasks after implementing UCS. These organizations were able to shift their resources time to new and innovative projects. While IT budgets often shrunk or remained the same, the demand for IT resources simply increased to meet the challenges they needed to simplify their organization. 1.1 UCS Manager and Service Profiles

KEY MESSAGE: Service Profiles and Service Templates enable rapid deployment and scaling. The multiple-month process for deploying a new application on older data center infrastructure can be reduced to hours or minutes with Cisco Unified Computing System, removing a major impediment to innovation. To understand how the Cisco Unified Computing System delivers these benefits, it is necessary to understand the concept of a Service Profile, the fundamental mechanism by which the Cisco Unified Computing System models the necessary abstractions of server, storage, and networking. A Service Profile specifies every server that is provisioned in the Cisco Unified Computing System. A service profile is a software definition of a server and its LAN and SAN network connectivity, in other words, a service profile defines a single server and its storage and networking characteristics. Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. By leveraging the unique features available with UCS, you will be able to demonstrate how easily and quickly new datacenter resources can be provisioned in your environment. What used to take weeks now takes minutes. In the following demonstration, we will explore the different attributes associated with a Service Profile, discuss the benefits they provide and also how they abstract the identity of a server from the underlying hardware that supports it.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 15 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the Internet Explorer shortcut labeled Cisco UCS Manager. This will open the UCS Manager webpage. STEP 3. Click on the Launch link and enter your access credentials when prompted. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 4. Take a minute to explain how UCSM is structured: the Navigation pane, which is used to browse the different elements in the system, and the Work Pane, used to make configuration changes or edits. Highlight the ease of use of this menu driven Graphical User Interface.

STEP 5. In the Navigation pane, navigate to Equipment > Chassis > Chassis 1 > Servers. STEP 6. Select the server assigned to you and noted in the UCS Server Assignment section. This server will host all the elements in the demonstration that you are conducting (Virtual Machines, Virtual Desktop Broker and Provisioning Services).

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 16 of 97

STEP 7. At this point, you want to take a moment to browse through the various tabs available in this view, such as Inventory, Virtual Machines, etc., and describe how UCSM provides in-depth visibility into the hardware and the software components associated with a blade server and other resources. With UCS Manager, we can segment the administration privileges of both my storage specialist and my network specialist, so they can cover their respective areas of responsibility. The GUI approach in UCS Manager really helped with the learning curve and we use it regularly for Moves, Adds and Changes. Additionally, we have created scripts that accelerate the provisioning time even further, by leveraging other configuration interfaces is UCSM, such as the CLI and the XML API.

Cisco UCS Manager provides unified, centralized, embedded management of all software and hardware components of the Cisco Unified Computing System across multiple chassis and thousands of virtual machines. Cisco UCS Manager manages the entire Cisco Unified Computing System as a single logical entity through an intuitive GUI, a command-line interface (CLI), or an XML API. By enabling better automation of processes, Cisco UCS Manager allows data center managers to achieve greater agility and scale in their server operations while reducing complexity and risk. Cisco UCS Manager provides flexible role- and policy-based management using service profiles and templates and facilitates processes based on IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) concept.

STEP 8. Under the General tab for your server, click on the Service Profile link. The URL is in a format similar to this: org-root/org-DCV/ STEP 9. A new window opens and the Service Profile associated with this physical server is shown:

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 17 of 97

Service profiles are stored in the Cisco UCS 6100 Series Fabric Interconnects. When a service profile is deployed to a server, UCS Manager automatically configures the server, adapters, fabric extenders, and fabric interconnects to match the configuration specified in the service profile. This automation of device configuration reduces the number of manual steps required to configure additional servers, converged network adapters (CNAs), network interface cards (NICs), host bus adapters (HBAs), and LAN and SAN ports on the fabric interconnects.

STEP 10. At this point, you want to take a moment to browse through the various tabs available in this view, such as Storage, Network, Boot Order, etc., and describe how Service Profiles capture the identity of a server in software, abstracting it from the actual physical hardware lying underneath. Since our organization adopted the UCS architecture, our productivity has increased. We are able to tailor our compute resources to the specific needs of the business. Service Profiles allow us to preprovision the identity of a server even before the server is installed in the chassis, and also to re-provision a server that is already installed. This translates into tangible time savings that help our bottom-line.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 18 of 97

A service profile typically includes four types of information: Server definition: It defines the resources (e.g. a specific server or a blade inserted to a specific chassis) that are required to apply to the profile. Identity information: Identity information includes the UUID, MAC address for each virtual NIC (vNIC), and WWN specifications for each virtual HBA associated with the Converged Network Adapter. Using Ciscos VIC enables the creation of up to 56 virtual NIC or virtual HBA adapters. Firmware revision specifications: These are used when a certain tested firmware revision is required or for some other reason a specific firmware is used. OS boot order policies: These are used to define server boot from SAN vs. booting off local disk or CD. Connectivity definition: It is used to configure VLANs and VSANs used by network and HBA adapters, on fabric extenders, and parent interconnects, however this information is abstract, as it does not include the details of how each network component is configured.

Service profiles enable rapid deployment and scaling. Cisco UCS Service Profiles are a powerful tool for streamlining the management of modern data centers. They provide a mechanism for rapidly provisioning servers and their associated network and storage connections with consistency in all details of the environment, and they can be set up in advance of the physical installation of the servers, which is extremely useful in most organizations. This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 19 of 97

1.2 Provisioning a New Blade Server from a Service Template

IMPORTANT: This demonstration is currently not available on the Labgear site.

IMPORTANT: The steps in this demonstration are the same as in task 4.2, FlexPod Scalability Server and Chassis. While this task focuses on rapid provisioning of new resources, task 4.2 emphasizes how a server sitting on a different chassis can be added in order to scale the capacity of a FlexPod deployment. It is a good idea to cover both benefits in one single demonstration, in order to save time and consolidate efforts.

IMPORTANT: The process of assigning a Service Profile to a physical server takes approximately 20 minutes. It is recommended that after assigning the Service Profile, you continue to cover other aspects of the demonstration while the process completes.

KEY MESSAGE: Service Profiles and Service Templates enable rapid deployment and scaling. With the flexibility of Service Profiles and Service Templates, provisioning a new blade is very simple. The most common use of a template after it has been defined is to deploy new applications on a fabric of underlying physical servers, storage solutions, and networks.

Show a time-lapsed video, which covers a side-by-side comparison of a Cisco UCS chassis vs. HP. Ciscos approach is 47% faster and more efficient: http://youtu.be/nijWlNzSgCQ

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. In order to accommodate a new department coming online after an acquisition, you have determined the need to provision a new blade server in the UCS chassis. The new server needs to comply with a predefined set of networking, storage and naming rules, established by your organization. In the following demonstration, we will show how to provision a new server blade from an existing template.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 20 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the Internet Explorer shortcut labeled Cisco UCS Manager. This will open the UCS Manager webpage. STEP 3. Click on the Launch link and enter your access credentials when prompted. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. IMPORTANT: In the following steps, X represents the POD number assigned to you, if you are using the Labgear resources.

STEP 4. Click on the Server tab in the left pane and navigate to Servers > Service Profile Templates > root > Sub-Organizations > DCV > Sub-Organizations > VDI-X > Service Template VDI-XTEMPLATE-1.

STEP 5. Click on the various tabs in the Work pane and take a minute to explore and explain the reference Service Template. We have a Service Template that captures the most optimal configuration for our Virtual Desktop environment. We can invoke this template very quickly, and derive a Service Profile from it, which can then be attached to a new, or existing, server. What used to take us days, or even weeks, is now a matter of minutes.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 21 of 97

For a detailed description of the Service Template configuration options and parameters, please refer to the following document: Configuring Service Profiles and Templates. The real power of the service profile becomes evident in templates. A service profile template parameterizes the UUIDs that differentiate one instance of an otherwise identical server from another.

A template can be used to generate either a single instance or multiple instances of its underlying server definition. This capability is one of the most powerful features of service profiles and is the actual mechanism that enables organizations to use the Cisco Unified Computing System to scale a workload to meet demand, deploy large numbers of servers in a fabric, deploy an instance of a complex application that spans multiple servers in a distributed environment, and deploy other similarly powerful applications.

STEP 6.

Click on Create Service Profiles From Template.

IMPORTANT: In the following steps, X represents the POD number assigned to you, if you are using the Labgear resources.

STEP 7. Use the following name for your Service Profile: VDI-X-SP-A. Since you will be creating only one Service Profile, change the Number to 1. STEP 8. Navigate to Servers > Service Profiles > root > Sub-Organizations > DCV > SubOrganizations > VDI-X. Notice how a new Service Profile named VDI-X-SPA2 has been added to the system.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 22 of 97

STEP 9. Right click on the new Service Profile and click on Associate with Server Pool. STEP 10. If a server is available in the pool, the service profile will be associated with a blade and you can proceed to boot it up. IMPORTANT: The process of assigning a Service Profile to a physical server takes approximately 20 minutes. It is recommended that after assigning the Service Profile, you continue to cover other aspects of the demonstration while the process completes.

Thats it. Bringing a new server online is now a semi-automated process. No racking and stacking, no cabling and the provisioning errors have been largely eliminated.

Service Templates enable rapid deployment and scaling. This rapid provisioning demonstrates how Cisco UCS Manager, through its use of service templates, enables the streamlining of important installation operations. While each customer environment is unique, customers are reporting CapEx reductions of 20 percent or more, and OpEx reductions in a wider range, depending on how aggressively they move to take advantage of advanced features of the Cisco Unified Computing System, including templates.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 23 of 97

1.3 Provisioning Virtual Desktops using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC)

KEY MESSAGE: NetApps Rapid Cloning Utility, part of NetApps Virtual Storage Console (VSC), is designed to save customers time, offload storage activity to the controller and reduce storage capacity requirements of VMware vCenter managed virtual infrastructures. The Rapid Cloning Utility is a VMware vCenter plug-in that enables customer to: Create virtual machine clones in VMware vCenter from powered-down VMs or templates. Quickly and efficiently create clones in new or existing datastores using very little storage capacity. Apply guest customization specifications to the resulting virtual machines. Destroy VMs in selected datastores, detach datastores, and free space on the storage controller. Deploy virtual machines for both server and desktop use.

The Rapid Cloning Utility (RCU) offers many features, including: Provision new NFS or VMFS datastore to all hosts in a Datacenter, a Compute Cluster or an individual Host. Resize NFS datastore (grow and shrink). Manage Deduplication. Support for rapid cloning of VMs to VMFS. Control over which datastore each VMDK file within a VM is cloned into. Automatic import into VMware View. Manual import into Citrix XenDesktop. The ability to specify which components of the controller should be accessible to RCU.

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently, a new department was added to the organization and IT has been asked to provision 100 new desktops. You will use the Rapid Cloning Utility (RCU) within NetApps Virtual Storage Console (VSC) to complete this task.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 24 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. Navigate to Home > Inventory > VMs and Templates and locate the Infrastructure folder. STEP 4. Right-click on the VM called Golden_Image and navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Create Rapid Clones. Click Yes if a certificate window pops up. The RCU wizard will open. STEP 5. Select the Target Storage Controller assigned to your POD. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details.

STEP 6. Click Next and under Clone Destination select your ESXi host. Ensure that the checkbox for Specify the virtual machine folder for new clones is checked. Click Next. STEP 7. Under the Virtual Machine Folder tab, expand the menus and select the VM_Folder folder. Click Next.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 25 of 97

STEP 8. Under the Disk Format tab leave the default option checked, Same format as source. Click Next. STEP 9. Under Virtual machine details, use default values for the radio button, ensure that no checkboxes are checked. Specify 5 under Number of clones (due to time constraints you should explain we will limit the exercise to 5 VMs). Finally, pick a name prefix for the clones. You may explore the broker options (Citrix and VMware) but do not select any. Click Next.

STEP 10. Select the INFRASTRUCTURE_DS datastore for these new VMs and click Next. STEP 11. Review your selections and click Apply when ready. Go back if you need to make adjustments. At this point, VSC will proceed to create the new Virtual Desktops. The Rapid Cloning Utility allows for the seamless creation of new VMs in VMware View and Citrix XenDesktop environments, leveraging a very comprehensive and painless provisioning wizard. For a handful of VMs, the provisioning process is very quick, however, you can proceed with the remaining demo tasks and go back to vCenter after the process has been completed.

The NetApp VSC Provisioning and Cloning plug-in, along with the Rapid Cloning Utility wizard, provides customers with the ability to rapidly provision, manage, import, and redeploy thousands of VMs. This plug-in leverages file and volume FlexClone technologies, to create hardware-assisted clones. It is tightly integrated into VMware vCenter and can automatically import VMs directly into VMware View 4.6 and manually into Citrix XenDesktop 5.0.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 26 of 97

1.4 Provisioning New Storage Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC)

KEY MESSAGE: NetApps Virtual Storage Console (VSC) is designed to save customers time, offload storage activity to the controller and reduce storage capacity requirements of VMware vCenter managed virtual infrastructures. The VSC can be used to provision new volumes (datastores) in a simple set of steps and it also can be used to configure and monitor storage efficiency features. The VSC is the recommended best practice for deploying VMware on NetApp. It's also a free product available on the NOW site at now.netapp.com.

When provisioning new storage, the VSC offers many features, including: FC, FCoE, iSCSI & NFS datastores: o Create, clone, resize, and destroy. o Supports VMware vStorage APIs for Array Integration (VAAI) Full Copy & Block Zero. Set multi-pathing policies for VMFS & NFS. Secures access to storage. o LUN masking. o NFS exports. Storage Efficiencies o Enable & Monitor data deduplication. o Enables hardware-based FlexClones of VMs & datastores.

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently, a new department was added to the organization and IT has been asked to new storage for them. You will use the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) to complete this task.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 27 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores, right-click on the FlexPod datacenter icon and then navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Provision datastore.

STEP 4. The wizard window will appear. Under Storage Controller details select NETAPP_FLEXPOD for the Target Storage Controller. Click Next.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 28 of 97

STEP 5.

For Datastore type, select NFS. Click Next.

STEP 6. Under Datastore details, enter 10 under size, ENGINEERING under Datastore name and pick aggr1 for Aggregate. Ensure that the Thin provision checkbox is checked. Click Next.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 29 of 97

STEP 7.

Review the Summary page and click Apply.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 30 of 97

STEP 8.

Review the settings for the new datastore created in vCenter.

A new volume for the Engineering department was provisioned effortlessly. As the IT lead, I could delegate this function to the storage administrator, which would translate into even more significant time savings that help my companys bottom-line.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 31 of 97

In this last step, we will confirm how the VSC automatically enables deduplication for the newly provision datastores, in compliance with the best practices for FlexPod put forth by NetApp and Cisco.

In storage technology, deduplication essentially refers to the elimination of redundant data. In the deduplication process, duplicate data is deleted, leaving only one copy of the data to be stored. However, indexing of all data is still retained should that data ever be required. Deduplication is able to reduce the required storage capacity since only the unique data is stored.

STEP 9. In vCenter, right-click on the new ENGINEERING datastore and navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and cloning > Deduplication management. Confirm that deduplication has been enabled for this volume.

Using NetApps Virtual Storage Console (VSC) customers can provision new datastores and volume in a matter of minutes. When NetApp storage is configured using VSC, it automatically makes sure that storage settings such as multipath settings for Fibre Channel, HBA timeouts, or NFS settings adhere to NetApp best practices. It also provides end-to-end troubleshooting should a connectivity problem arise.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 32 of 97

IMPORTANT: If you are following this demo script sequentially and you are NOT planning on showing task 1.5 Storage resizing using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC), please destroy this datastore at the end of this task. This will allow you to conduct additional demonstrations described later in the document. To do this, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores, right-click on the ENGINEERING datastore icon and then navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Destroy.

IMPORTANT: If you are using the Labgear infrastructure, please DO NOT DELETE OR MANIPULATE ANY OTHER DATASTORE but the ENGINEERING one. Doing so would crash your demo environment.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 33 of 97

1.5 Storage Resizing Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC)

KEY MESSAGE: NetApps Virtual Storage Console (VSC) is designed to save customers time, offload storage activity to the controller and reduce storage capacity requirements of VMware vCenter managed virtual infrastructures. The VSC can be used to provision new volumes (datastores) in a simple set of steps and it also can be used to configure and monitor storage efficiency features. The VSC is the recommended best practice for deploying VMware on NetApp. It's also a free product available on the NOW site.

VSC offers the ability to resize Fiber Channel, FCoE, iSCSI and NFS datastores.

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently, a new department was added to the organization and IT has been asked to increase the storage capacity originally allocated to this department. You will use the Virtual Storage Console (VSC) to complete this task.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 34 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores, right-click on the ENGINEERING datastore icon and then navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Resize.

STEP 4.

Increase the datastore size to 12GB and click OK and Accept in the dialog window.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 35 of 97

STEP 5.

Under the Datastores tab, verify the new volume size.

An existing volume for the Engineering department was resized effortlessly. As the IT lead, I could delegate this function to the storage administrator, which would translate into even more significant time savings that help my companys bottom-line.

IMPORTANT: If you are following this demo script sequentially, please destroy this datastore at the end of this task. This will allow you to conduct additional demonstrations described later in the document. To do this, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores, right-click on the ENGINEERING datastore icon and then navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Destroy.

IMPORTANT: If you are using the Labgear infrastructure, please DO NOT DELETE OR MANIPULATE ANY OTHER DATASTORE but the ENGINEERING one. Doing so would crash your demo environment. This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 36 of 97

2. Simple System Administration and ManagementThis section shows how FlexPod, its components and features, provide the tools to guarantee an unmatched administration experience for the IT professionals in charge of the infrastructure.

DID YOU KNOW? In an Forrester study commissioned by Cisco, the IT staff of the organizations interviewed on average spent 60% of their time on installation, management, and provisioning of their prior hardware environment. Migrating to UCS allowed them to decrease 50% of the groups allocated time on tasks as previously stated. 2.1 Server and Chassis Administration with UCS Manager

KEY MESSAGE: UCS Manager provides simplicity through a hierarchical information model. All the physical and logical components that comprise the Cisco Unified Computing System are represented in a hierarchical management information model referred to as a management information tree. Each node in the tree represents a managed object (or group of objects) that contains its configuration and operational state. Hierarchically organizing the management information reflects an intuitive containment of the objects. It also facilitates parallel and asynchronous management operations on individual managed objects and on subtrees of managed objects. End users can get a glimpse of this tree by examining the organization and labeling of the management information in the GUI. Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution who has recently been introduced to the UCS platform. Even though you have been working with Server, LAN and SAN products for a long time, the Unified Fabric paradigm is new to you and you are interested in ways to manage it without spending countless hours in trying to learn a CLI or a scripting tool. In the following demonstration, we will show UCS Manager provides value by offering a simple way to administer the UCS infrastructure.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 37 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the Internet Explorer shortcut labeled Cisco UCS Manager. This will open the UCS Manager webpage. STEP 3. Click on the Launch link and enter your access credentials when prompted. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 4. Click on the Servers tab in the left navigation page and select All in the filter drop-down. Take a moment to describe the tree structure in UCSM and the hierarchical model that it employs.

With the model-driven framework, Cisco UCS Manager separates business logic from platform implementation. This approach lets programmers develop the business logic independent of the platform implementation, thus permitting more rapid support for new platforms. This approach also helps simplify software maintenance, since model logic errors should be easily distinguished from platform implementation errors. Additionally, troubleshooting and maintenance operations are simplified because natively verifying that a particular management operation has succeeded is easy to accomplish. Finally, this separation permits the insertion of a software layer that emulates the platform components. UCS Manager provides simplicity through a hierarchical information model.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 38 of 97

2.2 Network Visibility with Data Center Network Manager (DCNM)

KEY MESSAGE: Cisco Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) optimizes the overall uptime andreliability of your data center infrastructure and helps improve business continuity, while providing a comprehensive administration experience. This advanced management product: Automates provisioning of data center LAN and SAN elements Proactively monitors the SAN and LAN, and detects performance degradation Helps secure the data center network Eases diagnosis and troubleshooting of data center outages Simplifies operational management of virtualized data centers

Demonstration Notes You are the Network administrator of a large financial institution who has recently been introduced to the UCS platform. Even though you have extensive experience with the Cisco switching portfolio and the Cisco IOS CLI, you are looking for simpler ways to manage the switching infrastructure. This demonstration will show how Data Center Network Manager (DCNM) can be used in virtualized environment to administer a key FlexPod component: the Nexus 1000V Distributed Virtual switch.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 39 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the Cisco DCNM-LAN shortcut and enter username and password for the Data Center Network Manager. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. After login into DCNM, navigate to Interfaces > Port Profile.

In Cisco Nexus 1000V, port profiles are used to configure interfaces. A port profile can be assigned tomultiple interfaces giving them all the same configuration. Changes to the port profile can be propagated automatically to the configuration of any interface assigned to it.

STEP 4.

Navigate to Interfaces > Logical > Virtual Ethernet.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 40 of 97

This screens shows how vEthernet interfaces are created on the Cisco Nexus 1000V to represent virtual ports in use on the distributed virtual switch, making it easy for the network administrator to understand how Virtual Machines connect to the network.

vEthernet interfaces are mapped to connected ports by MAC address as well as DVPort number. When a server administrator changes the port profile assignment on a vNIC or hypervisor port, the same vEthernet interface is reused.

Cisco DCNM is designed to manage converged data center fabric and features. It provides data center operational dashboards and topology views, as well as: Proactive and real-time operational monitoring of the network. Historical performance and capacity trends of the data center network. End-to-end path analytics for virtualized environments. Comprehensive provisioning and monitoring of multihop FCoE deployments. Simplified provisioning of important Cisco NX-OS innovations.

The Cisco Nexus 1000V Series provides a common management model for both physical and virtual network infrastructures through Cisco VN-Link technology that includes policy-based virtual machine connectivity, mobility of virtual machine security and network properties, and a non-disruptive operational model.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 41 of 97

3. Uncompromised End User ExperienceThis section shows how FlexPod, its components and features, provide the tools to guarantee a positive application experience for end users.

DID YOU KNOW? In a Forrester study commissioned by Cisco, many organizations interviewed stated that by using Cisco technology, they have been able to reduce the time-to-completion (production) of their applications for their business units, allowing end users to have access to applications faster. Additionally, End User Productivity Savings contributed 2% to the overall benefit. This cost represents an improvement in end user productivity when the number of planned and unplanned downtimes was reduced.

3.1 Network Persistence after a vMotion Event

IMPORTANT: This demonstration task is currently not available on the Labgear site.

IMPORTANT: This demonstration calls for a second blade server to be provisioned on the system beforehand. This server needs to meet the necessary connectivity requirements imposed by the vMotion feature. In this document, task 4.2 FlexPod Scalability Server and Chassis illustrates a way in which this prerequisite can be met.

KEY MESSAGE: The Cisco Nexus 1000V allows policy to move with a virtual machine during live migration ensuring persistent network, security, and storage compliance resulting in improved business continuance, performance management, and end user experience. Operating inside the VMware ESX hypervisor, the Cisco Nexus 1000V Series supports Cisco VN-Link server virtualization technology to provide: Policy-based virtual machine connectivity. Mobile virtual machine security and network policy. Non-disruptive operational model for server virtualization and networking teams.

With the Cisco Nexus 1000V Series, you can have a consistent networking feature set and provisioning process all the way from the virtual machine access layer to the core of the data center network infrastructure.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 42 of 97

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. You need to conduct maintenance work on a UCS server and chassis, which requires that you move several user desktops to another server/chassis. You are concerned that while doing so, user response times and overall utilization experience will be affected. You will conduct a vMotion event and demonstrate how the Nexus port profile serving that machine(s), maintains network state and uninterrupted connectivity during the live migration.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 43 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. Navigate to Home > Inventory > VMs and Templates and power on the first VM listed under No_Features.

STEP 4. Return to the management PC desktop and double-click on the Cisco DCNM-LAN shortcut and enter username and password for the Data Center Network Manager. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 5. Use vCenter to access the VM console and while on it, open a command prompt window and issue a continuous ping (ping a.b.c.d t) to the IP address of the Nexus VSM. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for this IP address. STEP 6. Return to DCNM and navigate to Interfaces > Logical > Virtual Ethernet and locate the VM you just started in the previous step.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 44 of 97

STEP 7. Select the Statistics on the bottom panel tab and then New Chart > Traffic Statistics Chart in the top menu bar. STEP 8. On the lower right corner, click on Select Parameters and check In Bytes, Out Bytes, In Packets and Out Packets. Click OK if a warning screen shows up.

STEP 9. Under Vethernet Traffic Statistics, select 30 secs frequency and click the Start button. After a few moments a chart like the one shown below should start plotting on the screen.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 45 of 97

STEP 10. Return to your vSphere Client session and right click on the VM being tracked. Select Migrate and proceed to vMotion this VM to the other host available in the VMware cluster. After the vMotion event is completed, the traffic statistics shown in DCNM vEthernet screen should remain constant and there should be minimal to no ICMP traffic loss reported on the command prompt screen of the VM console session. This demonstrates how Nexus 1000V maintains network traffic statistics even after a VM has moved between physical servers. This feature is unique to Nexus 1000V, a key component of the FlexPod solution.

Network and security policies defined in a port profile follow the virtual machine throughout its lifecycle, whether it is being migrated from one server to another, suspended, hibernated, or restarted. In addition to migrating the policy, the Cisco Nexus 1000V Series VSM moves the virtual machines network state. Virtual machines participating in traffic-monitoring activities can continue these activities uninterrupted by VMware vMotion operations.

Network persistence becomes particularly important if a VM is monitoring network traffic. Virtual machines participating in traffic-monitoring activities can continue these activities uninterrupted by VMware vMotion operations. When a specific port profile is updated, the Cisco Nexus 1000V Series automatically provides live updates to all the virtual ports using that same port profile.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 46 of 97

3.2 NetApp Flash Cache

IMPORTANT: It is recommended that you power on all VMs described in this step prior to the actual demonstration. This will allow the monitoring module of the Netapp Management Console (NMC) to plot the desired graphs, without your audience having to wait for the process to complete.

KEY MESSAGE: NetApp storage and I/O performance optimization technologies, Flash Cache and Deduplication, dramatically improve the VDI user experience by increasing system throughput and desktop response times. Flash Cache speeds access to data through intelligent caching by caching recently read user data and NetApp metadata in the storage controller. No setup or ongoing administration is needed. Flash Cache main benefits are: Effective for random read-intensive workloads, including databases, e-mail, file services, and more. Reduce latency by a factor of 10 or greater compared to hard disk drives. Increase I/O throughput when the disk subsystem is a performance bottleneck. Lower your costs by using SATA drives with Flash Cache for important workloads. Save power, cooling, and rack space by using fewer, larger hard disk drives.

Watch a YouTube video showcasing these NetApp benefits: http://youtu.be/dLiG3d8P0xA

Use Flash Cache modules to improve performance for workloads that are random read intensive such as file services, messaging, OLTP databases, and server/desktop virtualization. You can also use Flash Cache in combination with SATA drives for many workloads to increase storage capacity without compromising performance. You can configure up to 16TB of read cache in a storage system using Flash Cache cards. The ability to cache large quantities of active data makes Flash Cache cards effective across a broad set of workloads.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 47 of 97

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently, a new department was brought online and hundreds of new Virtual Machines had to be provisioned. Your end-users are reporting very high boot-up times, sluggish Windows performance and very slow application access. User satisfaction is extremely low. After doing some research, you have determined that the disk I/O performance is seriously compromised by a very high number of reads to the storage controller. You decide that this is a good opportunity to enable Flash Cache, in order to boost performance and improve the VDI user experience.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 48 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. Navigate to Home > Inventory > VMs and Templates and explore the two VM folders that have been pre-provisioned for this task.

The VMs in No_Features are stored in a volume that is not enabled for Flash Cache or deduplication, while the VMs in VM_Folder are associated with a datastore that does have these storage efficiency features enabled. We will see how the absence of these functionally impacts the IO performance and could be detrimental to our users experience.

STEP 4. On the Management PC desktop, double click on the NetApp Management Console shortcut and enter the IP address, username and password of the Data Fabric Manager. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 5. On the top menu bar, click on Tasks > Manage Performance and then select View from the left side menu.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 49 of 97

STEP 6. Expand the vFiler menu for the vFiler assigned to your POD. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 7. You will see several volumes under your vFiler.

The volume called VFILERX_DS (X corresponds to our POD number) has Flash Cache and deduplication enabled. This volume corresponds to the INFRASTRUCTURE_DS datastore in vCenter. The volume called VFILERX_DS2 (X corresponds to our POD number) has Flash Cache and deduplication disabled. This volume corresponds to the DEMO_VOLUME datastore in vCenter.

STEP 8. Click on the volume that has all storage efficiency features disabled. On the right navigation pane, select Volume Latency View from the Available views menu. STEP 9. Select 1-UP fro the bottom menu and drag the NFS Latency by Optype option into the navigation view. Change the range value to 1 hour. If you want, you can display the measured value names by selecting Show Legend.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 50 of 97

In idle state, the average NFS latency (read/write) for this volume is negligible. We will measure the impact of a boot storm by having 10 hosts come online at the same time.

STEP 10. Back on vCenter, click on the No_Features folder and select the Virtual Machine tab on the right pane view. STEP 11. Click on the first VM and then use the Shift + Down Arrow to select all VMs in the folder. Right-click on your selection and power on all these Virtual Machines.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 51 of 97

STEP 12. Back on the NetApp Management Console, monitor the NFS Latency by Optype while this simulated boot storm takes place. Make note of the values recorded by the graph on the screen. IMPORTANT: You will need to wait a few minutes for the graph to plot the near real-time performance monitoring of the NFS Latency. It is recommended that you power on all VMs described in this step prior to the actual demonstration. This will allow the monitoring module of the Netapp Management Console (NMC) to plot the desired graphs, without your audience having to wait for the process to complete.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 52 of 97

During this boot storm, the NFS read latency climbed from basically zero to a much higher value (approx. 8 msec, as shown in the graph), and oscillated around that value for the time it took to boot all VMs and get to the Windows login screen (approx. 2 minutes), only to stabilize later. In an environment with hundreds, or even thousands of VMs, where many of them can come online simultaneously, the time it would take for all users to log into their virtual desktops would be unacceptable. We need to resolve this situation and Flash Cache is the best option for the job.

STEP 13. In the NetApp Management Console, click on the volume that has all storage efficiency features enabled. On the right navigation pane, select Volume Latency View from the Available views menu.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 53 of 97

STEP 14. Select 1-UP fro the bottom menu and drag the NFS Latency by Optype option into the navigation view. Change the range value to 1 hour. If you want, you can display the measured value names by selecting Show Legend.

This volume hosts other VMs (like vCenter and the Nexus VSM), which is why the NFS Latency graph does show discernable activity, although still very low.

STEP 15. In vCenter, click on the VM_Folder folder and select the Virtual Machine tab on the right pane view. STEP 16. Click on the first VM and then use the Shift + Down Arrow to select all VMs in the folder. Right-click on your selection and power on all these Virtual Machines.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 54 of 97

STEP 17. Back on the NetApp Management Console, monitor the NFS Latency by Optype while this simulated boot storm takes place. Make note of the values recorded by the graph on the screen. IMPORTANT: You will need to wait a few minutes for the graph to plot the near real-time performance monitoring of the NFS Latency. It is recommended that you power on all VMs described in this step prior to the actual demonstration. This will allow the monitoring module of the Netapp Management Console (NMC) to plot the desired graphs, without your audience having to wait for the process to complete.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 55 of 97

During this boot storm, the NFS read latency climbed to a much higher value (approx. 1.6 msec), but this value is significantly lower than the previous case and represents an 80% reduction in latency, comparatively. It took approximately 1 minute from power-on to login screen on the Virtual Desktops, which means a 50% reduction in user waiting time. The effect that Flash Cache can have over the system usability is evident. My users are better served and my infrastructure better utilized, since Flash Cache speeds access to data through intelligent caching of recently read user data in the storage controller, a situation that is common in a VDI environment (common underlying data and an intensive read workload profile).

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 56 of 97

With Flash Cache you can: Increase I/O throughput by up to 75%. Use up to 75% fewer disk drives without compromising performance. Increase e-mail users by up to 67% without adding disk drives.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 57 of 97

3.3 Desktop Re-deployment Using the Virtual Storage Console (VSC)

KEY MESSAGE: NetApp VSC gives administrators the ability to patch or update template VMs and redeploy virtual machines based off the original template, in a quick and efficient manner. When desktops or servers are deployed for the first time, VSC will track and maintain the relationship between the desktop and the baseline template. Then, when requested, the administrator can redeploy clones for one or all of the virtual machines that were originally created from the baseline.

The use cases for redeploy include but are not limited to: Redeploy after applying Windows patches to the VMs baseline. Redeploy after upgrading or installing new software to the VMs baseline. Redeploy when end user calls helpdesk with issues and providing fresh VM would most easily solve user issues.

This model of deployment and redeployment works only when end-user data is not stored on a local drive.

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently you installed several software updates and patches, and made changes to the baseline template virtual machine. You will now use the VSC to quickly update the users desktops in an efficient and secure manner.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 58 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. Navigate to Home > NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning and select the Re-deploy option (accept any certificate that might show up). STEP 4. Select the Golden_Image from the list of Baselines and lick on Re-deploy.

STEP 5.

Select the all VMs in VM_Folder and click Next.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 59 of 97

STEP 6.

Select Use current settings and click Next.

STEP 7. Review the changes in the Summary screen and click Apply. Click OK when the following dialog box appears.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 60 of 97

In just a few minutes, an administrator can apply bulk changes to the users desktop, which maximizes operational efficiencies, reduces downtime and delivers high customer satisfaction.

VSC redeploy uses NetApp FlexClone to create near instantaneous clones of the reference image file while not disturbing the virtual machine configuration information. This demonstrates the uncompromised user experience provided by the FlexPod solution.

This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 61 of 97

4. Reducing Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)This section covers several features that demonstrate how the shared IT infrastructure at the core of FlexPod helps you to maximize efficiency and decrease costs through optimized asset utilization.

DID YOU KNOW? In a Forrester study commissioned by Cisco, interviewed organizations that adopted Cisco technologies reduced the total amount of physical hardware while they increased their computing power. Retaining the same data center space while increasing computing power and reducing power and cooling costs was an important benefit to these customers. It eliminated the need to consider expansion to another location onpremises or an outside location. 4.1 Storage Deduplication

KEY MESSAGE: NetApp Storage Deduplication results in measurable cost and management benefits. NetApp deduplication combines the benefits of granularity, performance, and resiliency to provide you with a significant advantage in the race to provide for ever-increasing storage capacity demands. NetApp deduplication is a key component of NetApps storage efficiency technologies, which enable users to store the maximum amount of data for the lowest possible cost. Watch a YouTube video showcasing NetApps Deduplication: http://youtu.be/b0B-UFV_qro

NetApp deduplication is free built into Data ONTAP and is an out-of-band, scheduled process that removes duplicate 4KB blocks of data from a volume, leaving behind a pointer to the identical block. Data can be deduped regardless of the protocol being used to access it (CIFS, NFS, iSCSI, FC) or the type of disk (SATA, SAS, FC, or 3rd party disk via V-series) on which it is housed. Deduplication rates of 85% or more have been observed for some data types (e.g. VMware images, VDI desktops, backup sets); actual dedupe rates will vary from customer to customer. Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. Recently, a new department was brought online and hundreds of new Virtual Machines had to be provisioned. Since all these Virtual Desktops are based on a Golden Image, they share the same disk characteristics. You will make use of the NetApp deduplication feature to optimize your storage resource utilization.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 62 of 97

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 63 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on the VMware vSphere Client shortcut and enter the IP and the credentials of the vCenter Server. Refer to section IP Addresses, Usernames and Passwords for the details. STEP 3. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Inventory > VMs and Templates. Notice the two folders, No_Features and VM_Folder. Each one contains 10 pre-provisioned Virtual Desktops, all derived from a pre-defined Golden Image. STEP 4.

In order to save time and make for a more agile, interesting demo, we have pre-provisioned 20 Virtual Desktops. All VMs in No_Features, are stored in a volume that has deduplication turned off, while 10 other VMs with the exact same characteristics (VM_Folder) are mapped to a volume that has deduplication turned on.

STEP 5. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores. Select the DEMO_VOLUME datastore, which has deduplication turned OFF and then click on the Performance tab. At the same time, right click on the datastore in question and navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Deduplication management. You should see something like the figure below. Make note of the Virtual Disk storage utilization.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 64 of 97

The Used line is measuring storage utilization on this volume. Considering we just have a handful of desktops, the utilization is to high and definitely inefficient.

STEP 6. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Inventory > Datastores. Select the INFRASTRUCTURE_DS datastore, which has deduplication turned ON and then click on the Performance tab. At the same time, right click on the datastore in question and navigate to NetApp > Provisioning and Cloning > Deduplication management. You should see something like the figure below. Make note of the Virtual Disk storage utilization.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 65 of 97

Even though both volumes are hosting approximately the same amount of Virtual Machines, all with the same characteristics, the total Virtual Disk utilization (Used graph line) differs greatly between them due to the use of deduplication. A more accurate representation of the impact of these storage savings technologies can be obtained via NetApps VSC Plugin for vCenter, which we will demonstrate in the following steps.

STEP 7. In vCenter, navigate to Home > Solution and Applications > NetApp. On the left hand side, click on the Monitoring and Host Configuration tab and select Storage Details NAS. Compare the Deduplication metrics of both the DEMO_VOLUME and the INFRASTRUCTURE_DS datastores, which have deduplication turned off and on respectively.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 66 of 97

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 67 of 97

NetApp Storage Deduplication result is measurable cost and management benefits. Deduplication utilizes minimal system resources - primary data, backup data, and archival data can all be deduplicated with minimal impact on data center operations. This concludes this demo activity.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 68 of 97

4.2 FlexPod Scalability Server and Chassis

IMPORTANT: This demonstration is currently not available on the Labgear site.

IMPORTANT: The steps in this demonstration are the same as in task 1.2, Provisioning a new blade from a Service Template. Task 1.2 focuses on rapid provisioning of new resources, while this task emphasizes how a server sitting on a different chassis can be added in order to scale the capacity of a FlexPod deployment. It is a good idea to cover both benefits in one single demonstration, in order to save time and effort.

IMPORTANT: The process of assigning a Service Profile to a physical server takes approximately 20 minutes. It is recommended that after assigning the Service Profile, you continue to cover other aspects of the demonstration while the process completes.

KEY MESSAGE: FlexPod configurations can be right-sized up or out, and then duplicated in modular fashion to fit your specific organizational needs. FlexPod can scale up for greater performance and capacity or it can scale out for environments that need consistent, multiple deployments. FlexPod is a baseline configuration, but also has the flexibility to be sized and optimized to accommodate many different use cases.

One Cisco UCS Manager instance can manage two Cisco UCS 6100 Series Fabric Interconnects, 40 Cisco UCS 5100 Series Chassis, 80 Cisco UCS 2100 Series Fabric Extenders, and hundreds of Cisco UCS B-Series Blade Servers. Cisco UCS Manager automatically discovers devices that are added, moved, or removed from the system; adds them to its inventory; and applies service profile configurations as appropriate.

Demonstration Notes You are the IT administrator of a large financial institution. You need to add a new server to the infrastructure in order to support additional desktops and users. You will use UCS Manager to quickly provision incremental compute resources, thus optimizing the operational costs of the infrastructure by accelerating time-to-provision.

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 69 of 97

All contents are Copyright 2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. and NetApp, Inc. Page 70 of 97

Demonstration Steps STEP 1. Connect to your Demonstration POD following the instructions in the Accessing your POD section. STEP 2. Once you have logged into your management PC, double-click on