First Peoples Principles of Learning - BCTELA ... First Peoples Principles of Learning • Learning

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  • First Peoples Principles of Learning: Exploring ways to Localize and Apply Indigenous Pedagogical Practices in the Language Arts Classroom Presented by Sara Florence Davidson

  • Overview • First Peoples Principles of Learning

    • First Peoples Principles of Learning Activity

    • sq’adada Principles

    • First Peoples Principles of Learning and sq’adada Principles comparison

    • First Peoples Principles of Learning and New Curriculum Activity

    • Questions and Comments

  • First Peoples Principles of Learning

  • First Peoples Principles of Learning • Developed by First Nations Education Steering Committee in partnership

    with BC Ministry of Education to create the English 12 First Peoples course

    • Created the First Peoples Principles of Learning to guide the creation of the curriculum for the course as well as the teaching of the course

    • Other Nations in British Columbia have their own principles

    • They were used to assist in the development of the new curriculum in British Columbia

    Source: Jo Chrona (2014). Background of FPPL and Current Contexts. Retrieved from: https://firstpeoplesprinciplesoflearning.wordpress.com/background-and-current-context/

  • First Peoples Principles of Learning • Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the

    community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors. • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on

    connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place). • Learning involves recognizing the consequences of one’s actions. • Learning involves generational roles and responsibilities. • Learning recognizes the role of Indigenous knowledge.

    • Learning is embedded in memory, history, and story. • Learning involves patience and time. • Learning requires exploration of one’s identity.

    • Learning involves recognizing that some knowledge is sacred and only shared with permission and/or certain situations.

  • Activity: What connections can we find between the First Peoples Principles of Learning? • Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the

    community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors.

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place).

    • Learning involves recognizing the consequences of one’s actions.

    • Learning involves generational roles and responsibilities.

    • Learning recognizes the role of Indigenous knowledge.

    • Learning is embedded in memory, history, and story.

    • Learning involves patience and time.

    • Learning requires exploration of one’s identity.

    • Learning involves recognizing that some knowledge is sacred and only shared with permission and/or certain situations.

  • sq’adada Principles

  • The Story of the Halibut

    Before the Snag by Robert Davidson

  • The Principles Illustrated in The Story of the Halibut • Learning emerges from authentic experiences • Learning occurs through contribution • Learning occurs through observation • Learning emerges from curiosity • Learning honours aspects of spirituality and protocol

  • sq’adada Principles • Learning emerges from strong relationships.

    • Learning emerges from authentic experiences.

    • Learning emerges from curiosity.

    • Learning occurs through observation.

    • Learning occurs through contribution.

    • Learning occurs through recognizing and encouraging strengths.

    • Learning honours the power of the mind.

    • Learning honours history and story.

    • Learning honours aspects of spirituality and protocol.

  • Learning emerges from strong relationships • The Haida belief that your mind resides in your chest • My father’s experiences in the classroom • My own experiences in the classroom and from my

    research

  • Learning emerges from authentic experiences • Carving both sides of a totem pole • Reinforces the relevance of what is being taught • Learning from living and being on the land

  • Learning emerges from curiosity • My father was guided by his questions and this compelled

    him to learn more • Had to find the balance between being curious and asking

    too many questions • We can model curiosity in our teaching when we share

    our questions with students • Connects to learning through observation and some of the

    ideas that we are seeing around inquiry learning

  • Learning occurs through observation • My father learned from observation of his uncles, father,

    and grandfather • In school, my father was labeled as a slow learner

    because he did not engage in the same learning practices as non-Haida students

    • We do not often make time for learning through observation in school

  • Learning occurs through contribution • Makes learning authentic and gives it a purpose • The importance of quality in the contribution • My father’s commitment to contributing to his extended

    family guided much of his education outside of school

  • Learning occurs through recognizing and encouraging strengths • My father did not choose to be an artist, the adults

    around him recognized the strength and encouraged him • After a relationship has been established, it is possible to

    recognize the strengths that a student brings to the classroom

  • Learning honours the power of the mind • The power of visualization to achieve goals • The origin of totem poles • “Raven understood the mind was very powerful and so

    the Haida also understand the mind as being very powerful”

    • “The way the story is told, Raven would think it to happen. He wanted to go to Point B and he would get there in one stroke of the paddle.”

  • Learning honours history and story • Nanki’lslas “He whose voice is obeyed” • The stories of Raven served to help me to understand my

    father’s ideas • My father will often look to the past to help him to

    understand the present

  • Learning honours aspects of spirituality and protocol • In my father’s stories, knowledge transmission did not

    exist separately from spiritual practices and as such they made up a vital component of his traditional education

    • Though it may not be appropriate to share ceremonial practices in school, it needs to be recognized that this is a significant aspect of knowledge transmission in Indigenous communities

    • Spiritual aspects of knowledge may make up a significant aspect of the knowledge that Indigenous students may bring from home and it needs to be honoured and respected

  • Activity: What are the similarities and differences between the First Peoples Principles of Learning and the sq’adada Principles? • Learning emerges from strong relationships.

    • Learning emerges from authentic experiences.

    • Learning emerges from curiosity.

    • Learning occurs through observation.

    • Learning occurs through contribution.

    • Learning occurs through recognizing and encouraging strengths.

    • Learning honours the power of the mind.

    • Learning honours history and story.

    • Learning honours aspects of spirituality and protocol.

  • Group Activity • Form groups of 3-4

    • Select a book/text to read with your group. • How does the book reflect the First Peoples Principles of Learning? The

    Characteristics of Aboriginal Worldviews and Perspectives? sq’adada Principles?

    • Identify a theme in the text. How is this theme developed in the story using the images? Using the language or the story?

    • Consider how you can develop this theme into one or more classroom activities.

    • Using the template provided (or the other side of the page), think about ways to connect your ideas to the First Peoples Principles of Learning and the New Curriculum.

  • Using Indigenous Education Frameworks in the Classroom • Consider finding out about local learning frameworks that may already exist

    in your area

    • Find out about potential partnerships between the Ministry of Education and Indigenous groups or nations that may have created learning principles such as the First Peoples Principles for Learning

    • Ensure that you have permission to use these in the classroom context

  • Knowledge as a Living Process “Indigenous teachings provide that every child,

    whether Aboriginal or not, is unique in his or her learning capacities, learning styles, and knowledge

    bases. Knowledge is not what some possess and others do not; it is a resourceful capacity of being that creates the context and texture of life. Thus,

    knowledge is not a commodity that can be possessed or controlled by educational institutions,

    but is a living process to be absorbed and understood.”

    Source: Battiste, M. (2002). Indigenous knowledge and pedagogy in First Nations education: A literature review with recommendations. Ottawa, ON: Indian and Northern Affairs Can