Driven by Alfred Adler's Paradigm-Shifting, Rule-Breaking, Revolutionary Ideas for Sixty Years

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Adler School of Professional Psychology 2012 Annual Report

Text of Driven by Alfred Adler's Paradigm-Shifting, Rule-Breaking, Revolutionary Ideas for Sixty Years

  • DRIVEN BY ALFRED ADLERS PARADIGM-SHIFTING RULE- BREAKING REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS FOR SIXTY YEARS.

    Adler School of Professional Psychology 2012 Annual Report

    1952 2012

  • DRIVEN BY ALFRED ADLERS PARADIGM-SHIFTING RULE- BREAKING REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS FOR SIXTY YEARS.

    Leading socially responsible practice

    OUR HEALTH RESIDES IN OUR

    COMMUNITY LIFE.

  • DRIVEN BY ALFRED ADLERS PARADIGM-SHIFTING RULE- BREAKING REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS FOR SIXTY YEARS.

    TODAY: The Adler School of Professional Psychology continues the work of the first community psychologist, Alfred Adler, by graduating socially responsible practitioners, engaging communities, and advancing social justice.

    Alfred Adler taughtas the Adler School does today from its campuses in Chicago and Vancouverthat peoples health resides in their communities. And today, that is why volunteer staff members at RainCity Housing in Vancouvers Downtown Eastside are trained peer-group facilitatorsproviding more than shelter for their homeless clients who also deal with mental illness, addictions, and other challenges.

    Downtown Eastside is known throughout Canada for the dreadful conditions for those who live there, many of whom have substance abuse and mental health issues in addition to extreme poverty, says Deb Bailey, M.A., Community Service Practicum Coordinator at the Adler School in Vancouver. I always talk to students about completing projects that leave an Adlerian footprint. In Dawson Wambolts work, the impact is very apparent.

    During his first year of masters study in counselling psychology at the Adler School, Wambolt completed his Community Service Practicum (CSP) at RainCity Housing, a not-for-profit that provides progressive housing solutions for the homeless throughout the Lower Mainland. He developed and launched the peer-support training for its Downtown Eastside location staffmany of them formerly homeless themselvesthat enables them to apply basic group interaction, crisis intervention, and additional skills in facilitating roundtable discussions with clients.

    Wambolt returned to RainCity throughout 2011 and 2012well after his CSP endedto continue supporting the training. More than a year after its launch, the peer-support program continues growing.

    I was there to help meet the needs of the staff as much as they meet the needs of the people they serve, says Wambolt, who remained in Downtown Eastside for his clinical practicum, at

    Pender Community Health Clinic. Developing the program required taking an organizational psychology approach to training and structure, and how people react to changing structure, while applying Adlers concept of social interest in how environments produce function or dysfunction that affect the individual.

    His workand much more like it over the last 60 yearsis the work of the Adler School in educating and training socially responsible practitioners not simply to provide servicesbut to lead social change for community well-being and improved health outcomes. Such work took place throughout the Vancouver and Chicago campuses in 2011-12, and continues as the School begins its seventh decade, as faculty and students expand the breadth and depth of the Schools history of socially responsible practice and applied research.

    Alfred Adlers concepts of social interest and socially responsible practice specifically inform the Schools curriculum and training, says Larry Axelrod, Ph.D., Vancouver Campus Dean. As a result, our students, like Dawson, are specifically prepared to support sustainable change in the environmental and community structures that affect marginalized populations.

    Wambolt credits Introduction to Adlerian Psychology and Psychopathology as an instrumental Adler School course preparing him for his work in Downtown Eastside. Along with insights from students and faculty in his program, as well as others at the School, it provided the perspective and theory behind what a sense of community can do, he says.

    This coursework informed the establishment of the peer training program. It was remarkable to apply theory to produce something that ultimately took on a life of its own, and had such a positive impact for a community and the individuals involved.

    1870: Alfred Adler is born. He will become a physician, psychotherapist, and the founder of Adlerian psychology, sometimes called individual psychologyemphasizing the human need and ability to create positive social change and impact. 1933: Alfred Adler publishes Social Interest: A Challenge to Mankind, introducing his concept of social interest. 1961: Rudolf Dreikurs publishes Social Equality: The Challenge of Our Times through the Alfred Adler Institute. In 1971, it is revised and republished as Social Equality: Challenge of Today.

    The Socially Responsible Practice Project is a recently published report that articulates the outcomes of a yearlong series of conversations, events, and activities throughout the Adler School community. The goal was to strengthen our articulation and collective understanding of socially responsible practiceas the leading academic institution advancing socially responsible practice, healthy communities, and a more just society. The report can be found at adler.edu/srp.

    011952 2012

  • A SENSE OF CONNECTEDNESS WITH FAMILY REDUCES NEARLY EVERY HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOR, INCLUDING VIOLENCE, DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE, SUICIDAL THOUGHTS, AND EMOTIONAL DISTRESS.

    02

    Advancing parenting and child guidance

    At any given time, 1 in every

    children and adolescents is affected by serious emotional disturbances.

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    DRIVEN BY ALFRED ADLERS PARADIGM-SHIFTING RULE- BREAKING REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS FOR SIXTY YEARS.

  • The Adler Child Guidance Center, along with the LGBTQ Mental Health and Inclusion Center (LMHIC), is one of two centers that the Adler School launched last year to enrich its distinctive curricula and training for students, while providing professional development for practitioners and evidence-based programs for communities.

    Among its programs, ACGC provides for the Parent Education: Adlerian Theory and Interventions course taken by most Adler School students to develop their child guidance and parenting knowledge and skills. Through lecture, class discussion, observation, and participative demonstrations, students are taught how to facilitate a parenting group, and are supervised by faculty as they lead or co-lead parenting groups in the community.

    In ACGCs first year, doctoral student Thomas Lindquist, M.A., ATR, LPC, worked with Paul Rasmussen, Ph.D., ACGC Director and Adler School Core Faculty member, to collaborate with community organizations to offer Positive Discipline parenting programs based on the principles of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs.

    My specific role involved maintaining and building new community partnerships for

    parenting sites. These are the sites where Adler School students teach parenting classes in order to fulfill their course requirements, while also providing much-needed services to the community, says Lindquist, who himself taught a Positive Discipline course at Chicagos Haymarket Center, a comprehensive alcohol and drug treatment organization.

    ACGC advocates that parenting can be joyful and rewarding if care providers are supported and trained in how to raise children who are responsible, cooperative, and respectful of themselves and others. Those principles provide the foundation of most contemporary models for parent education.

    Yet, the Adlerian-Dreikursian approach advanced through ACGC uniquely stands apart: It emphasizes core aspects of the human conditionsuch as the desire for a sense of belongingand places importance on supporting parents and caregivers in all communities, particularly the most vulnerable and underserved.

    For this reason, ACGC provides accessible parenting training through free or low-cost workshops, as well as free 6- to 8-week courses through Chicago-area service agencies for parents

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    and other caregivers. Adler School students apply their coursework and preparation to lead the programs.

    At the School, ACGC sponsors open forums at which students discuss parent education and child guidance topics, and collaborates with the Schools M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling program and the Child and Adolescent Psychology track within the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program.

    In the year ahead, ACGC will continue building its outreach to parents of diverse race, gender, socio-economic, and geographic backgrounds, Dr. Rasmussen says. ACGC also is partnering with the Schools Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice (IPSSJ) to specifically examine and address the significant parenting obstacles that underprivileged families face.

    As a trained clinical psychologist, I see a lot of the problems that people develop because theyre simply not prepared to meet the challenges of adulthood, Dr. Rasmussen says. If children arent prepared, they are at risk for anxiety, depression, and many of the other clinical conditions that we see in our profession.

    Parenting is one of the most important things well ever do in our lives.

    1921: Alfred Adler establishes the first Child Guidance Clinic in Vienna, and lectures at Viennas Pedagogical Institute. 1938: Rudolf Dreikurs opens a Child Guidance Center on the South Side of Chicagothe Abraham Lincoln Centeroffering parenting education and training to the community. 1941: Dreikurs establishes the second Chicago Guidance Center at the Jane Addams Hull House Mary Crane Nursery. Dreikurs and his family are Hull House residents. 1952: Dreikurs establishes a Child Guidance Center in the Lake View neighborhood of Chicago.

    TODAY: A