DO NOW Convert the following from meters to feet or feet to meters. 1 foot = 0.3 meters 1.28.5 feet = meters? 2.13’ 9” = meters? 3. 28” = meters? 4.6.3

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    18-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
  • DO NOW Convert the following from meters to feet or feet to meters. 1 foot = 0.3 meters 1.28.5 feet = meters? 2.13 9 = meters? 3. 28 = meters? 4.6.3 meters = feet? 5.0.7 meters = feet? 6.14 meters = feet?
  • Slide 2
  • HISTORY OF THE PORT OF HOUSTON
  • Slide 3
  • Houston Ship Channel (HSC) Waterway that connects the Port of Houston with the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles long Port of Galveston, Port of Texas City and the Port of Houston are found along the HSC The last 25 miles is also known as the industrial ship channel
  • Slide 4
  • Houston Ship Channel
  • Slide 5
  • Port of Houston The Port of Houston is a cooperative entity along the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) consisting of both: The Port of Houston Authority (PHA) and More than 150 private companies situated along Buffalo Bayou and Galveston Bay
  • Slide 6
  • Houston Ship Channel
  • Slide 7
  • Port of Houston Facilities Houston
  • Slide 8
  • Port of Houston Authority (PHA) The Port of Houston Authority, or PHA, is an independent political subdivision of the State of Texas governed by a seven-member commission It operates or administers 8 terminals along the Houston Ship Channel that include the Barbours Cut and Bayport Container Terminals It is the Sponsor of the Houston Ship Channel
  • Slide 9
  • PHA Commission Chairman is chosen by the City & County 2 Members chosen by the City 2 Members chosen by the County 1 Member chosen by the City of Pasadena 1 Member chosen by the Harris County Mayors' and Councils' Association
  • Slide 10
  • PHA Commission Janiece M. Longoria (Chairwoman) John D. Kennedy (Harris County) Dean E. Corgey (City of Houston) Clyde Fitzgerald (Harris County) Theldon R. Branch (City of Houston) Stephen H. DonCarlos (Harris County Mayors' and Councils' Association) Roy D. Mease (City of Pasadena)
  • Slide 11
  • PHA Terminals Turning Basin Terminal Grain Elevator Woodhouse Care Terminal Jacintoport Bulk Terminal Barbours Cut Bayport
  • Slide 12
  • Barbours Cut Terminal
  • Slide 13
  • Houston Ship Channel Industries $15 Billion petrochemical complex 2 of the 4 largest refineries in the world Notable Industries along the HSC: Exxon (largest refinery in Houston area) Chevron Lyondell Valero
  • Slide 14
  • Texas in the Late 1800 On January 1, 1837, the Houston comprised twelve residents and one log cabin The Laura arrived on January 1837 and was the first ship ever to visit Houston Houston was just a town on Buffalo Bayou The Port of Galveston was largest port in Texas COTTON WAS KING!
  • Slide 15
  • Cotton in Galveston
  • Slide 16
  • Galveston Disaster in 1900 A hurricane hit Galveston on September 8, 1900 Wind speed estimates were about 145 mph Mostly wooden homes City unprotected without current Seawall You can imagine the results
  • Slide 17
  • 1900 Galveston Hurricane
  • Slide 18
  • Opportunity for Houston Galveston and the Port of Galveston had to rebuild Houston is 50 miles closer to the mainland cotton farms and relatively protected from a direct hurricane hit Which means Ships can be 50 miles closer to cargo and be safer in a storm However there was no HSC, just Buffalo Bayou
  • Slide 19
  • Houston Docks in 1900
  • Slide 20
  • Spindletop in 1901 - Rice in 1902 The oil discovery at Spindletop near Beaumont prompted Texas to embrace the oil business & Houston to become the center of the Texas oil industry Around 1902, the Japanese helped establish rice as a major crop in the Gulf Coast region By 1910, the docks, cotton, oil and rice helped Houston surpass Galvestons population
  • Slide 21
  • The Rest is History The citizens of Harris County approved creation of the modern port in 1909 President Woodrow Wilson officially opened the port to traffic on November 10, 1914 The Panama Canal opened in 1914 as well On January 10, 1910, Harris County decided to fund dredging the Houston ship channel to a depth of 25 feet for the amount of $1,250,000
  • Slide 22
  • The Port Today 1st ranked US port in foreign tonnage 7th ranked US container port by total TEUs in 2013 Largest Texas port with 46% of market share by tonnage and 95% market share in containers by total TEUS in 2013 Largest Gulf Coast container port, handling 66% of US Gulf Coast container traffic in 2013 2nd ranked US port in terms of cargo value waterborne
  • Slide 23
  • SO WHAT ?????? OK, the Port of Houston is big
  • Slide 24
  • The JY Maritime Academy Opens a Door to
  • Slide 25
  • JY Work SITE www.jymaritimeacademy.weebly.com
  • Slide 26
  • Lets Look at the Numbers Entry-level job at McDonalds pays minimum wage, $7.25 per hour or: $15,080 per year Entry-level job at a barge company pays about $30,000/year $15,080 per year $14.42 per hour
  • Slide 27
  • Panama Canal History
  • Slide 28
  • The French & the Suez Canal In 1869, the French diplomat & developer, Ferdinand de Lesseps opened the 102-mile long Suez Canal in Egypt connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. The sea-level canal across the Isthmus of Suez allowed ships to travel from India to Europe without going around Africa, eliminating more than 4300 miles from the old shipping routes. At 145 years-old, the Suez Canal is still one of the worlds most important maritime hubs with over 17,000 ships traversing it every year.
  • Slide 29
  • Suez Canal
  • Slide 30
  • Isthmus of Suez Isthmus - a narrow strip of land with sea on either side, forming a link between two larger areas of land Sea-Level Canal A canal without locks
  • Slide 31
  • Suez Canal
  • Slide 32
  • Ferdinand de Lesseps in Panama Ferdinand de Lesseps wanted to replicate his success in Egypt and saw the 50-mile Isthmus of Panama as another potential maritime hub and money-maker
  • Slide 33
  • The French Panama Canal-1881 De Lesseps and his French backers began work on Panama Canal in 1881 Engineers planned for a sea-level canal but ran into mountainous jungles & rocky terrain Yellow Fever & Malaria killed many workers Eventually, the French ran out of money and tried to salvage their investment by selling the project to the US.
  • Slide 34
  • US Panama Canal - 1904 Theodore Roosevelt is considering a canal in Panama or maybe Nicaragua De Lesseps negotiates with US but Panama is part of Colombia and has no interest in a US canal Back-room deals result in the US backing Panamanian independence, buying out the French & negotiating a US canal w/Panama
  • Slide 35
  • Canal Zone The US leases a swath of land in Panama about five miles wide and 50 miles long in perpetuity On November 18, 1903, the US & Panama agree to establish the Panama Canal Zone On February 26, 1904, Panama agrees to US occupation of the Canal Zone in perpetuity
  • Slide 36
  • Isthmus of Panama Crossing from Pacific to Atlantic, a ship travels in a northwesterly direction across the Panama Canal
  • Slide 37
  • Canal Zone
  • Slide 38
  • US Panama Canal 1904 to 1914 The US ran into same engineering and health problems as the French Colonel William Gorgas drained swamps and greatly improved sanitation to minimize mosquitoes carrying disease. In 1905 an engineering panel decided a lock system was more practical than a sea-level canal
  • Slide 39
  • Panama Canal Construction
  • Slide 40
  • Locks Raise/Lower Ships
  • Slide 41
  • My Home in the Canal Zone
  • Slide 42
  • Panama Canal Locks
  • Slide 43
  • Panama & Canal In 1977, the US & Panama agree to transition the Canal back to Panama On December 31, 1999, Panama obtained full control of the Panama Canal In 2006, Panamanians passed a referendum to allow the expansion of the Panama Canal at an estimated cost of $5.25 billion
  • Slide 44
  • Canal Expansion Expansion is due to finish around 2016 Deeper-draft ships will be able to cross the Canal. Capacity of the Canal will double
  • Slide 45
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shWrzvNG Ldw
  • Slide 46
  • FINISH CLASSWORK EXIT TICKET - Write a paragraph on the back of your worksheet explaining how you think the Panama Canal Expansion will benefit the Port of Houston