of 1 /1
452 merous and increasing family. Some months ago he had symptoms of paralysis; the right index and middle finger became benumbed, and he lost the power of extension over them. His declining health now began to excite the anxiety of his friends. Often have I endeavoured to induce him to relax his arduous labours, but his usual reply was, " The pressing wants of my family make it impossible for me to do so." He continued therefore to toil on until the evening of the 13th October, when, after returning home at seven P.M., he became exhausted, and was placed in a warm bed. About an hour from this time he was seized with hemiplegia of the right side, his speech became thick and indistinct, he gradually merged into coma, and died on the 16th Oct., at six P.M., at the early age of forty-two, leaving a wife and eleven children totally unprovided for. He was possessed of a cultivated intellect, was attached to literature, and his professional attainments were above the usual order. He was kind and considerate in his profession, an affectionate husband, and fond and anxious father. Endeavours are now being made to place two of the younger children in the Infant Hospital Asylum, Wanstead, and two others in the London Orphan Asylum. It is also desired, if possible, to procure admission for two of the boys into the Royal Medical Benevolent College, and it is hoped that those who have votes or interest in either of the above charities will kindly place them at my disposal in furtherance of the above object. THE SURGERY OF THE WAR. THE SANITARY CONDITION OF THE BRITISH ARMY IN THE CRIMEA DURING THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 20TH. THE Inspector-General of Hospitals states :-The health of the army in general is good, but some cases of cholera have e occurred, and 25 have proved fatal. From the change of wind to the southward, apprehensions were entertained at the close of last week that this would take place; but the disease has been confined to those recently landed in the country, and 8 out of the 25 deaths occurred in the Land Transport Corps, which has recently been augmented by large drafts from Eng- land. The 82nd Regiment, recently arrived from Corfu, is also suffering from diarrhoea, and one fatal case of cholera has occurred in it during the week; but in the 82nd, like the Land Transport Corps, the disease has been confined chiefly to the recruits who have recently joined the regiment. Drunkenness, I am sorry to say, is very common, and the increased pay favours it; many of the bowel complaints and febrile affections may be fairly traced, the medical officers think, to this cause, and it is an evil that will be found diffi- cult to check. The men are employed in road-making and other fatigues, but the night duty is light, and their wants are fully supplied. Huts are arriving daily, and as they arrive they are put up in the different divisions, and before the winter sets in I hope they will have replaced the tents altogether. The admissions to strength this week have been in the ratio of 2 ’83 per cent. ; the deaths to strength, 0 11 per cent. ; sick to healthy, 8’0 per cent.; exclusive of wounds, 5’88 per cent. THE PRACTICE OF SUR6ERT IN THE CAMP. Extract of a Letter from the Camp before Sebastopol, Oct. 1855. " If you knew the occupation I have had on account of the number of wounded men under my care, you would, I know, excuse mv apparent neglect in not answering your kind letters. The attack on the 8th of September gave me, in my regimental hospital, nearly 150 wounded, and I have still upwards of 80 remaining. Moreover, in our service there is such a vast amount of pen-and-ink work-much more than you could credit-that I cannot do many things more useful that I wish to do. I regret much I have not more time at my disposal. I am not idle, I assure you. I sent away five invalids to-day to England, and I have had twenty-four documents to write out with these five men !-one, for all practical purposes, should have been enough.’’ NEW LUNACY COMMISSIONER.-The Lord Chancellor has appointed Dr. James Wilkes, of the Staffordshire Lunatic Asylum, to the Commissionership in Lunacy, vacant by the resignation of Dr. Turner. DEATH OF MR. GEORGE PILCHER. Tms estimable member of the profession expired suddenly on Wednesday evening, at his residence, Harley-street, Cavendish-square, aged fifty-four. Mr. Pilcher had only just returned home from the delivery of his lecture on surgery to the students of St. George’s School of Medicine, when seized with his fatal illness. The lamented deceased was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons on the 2nd of April, 1824, and commenced the practice of his profession in Dean- street, Soho. Here, however, he did not succeed so well as he expected, and a vacancy occurring at the Webb-street School of the lectureship on Anatomy and Surgery, he offered himself as a candidate, and was duly elected, and soon became a great favourite with the students. He was soon after appointed Surgeon to the Surrey Dispensary, not, however, without in- curring the expense of making 300 votes; and removing to Great George-street, Westminster, soon rose rapidly into esti- mation as a most successful aurist, and obtained the Fother- gillian Prize for his " Treatise on the Structure and Pathology of the Ear." In 1843, Mr. Pilcher was elected a Fellow of the College, and at the time of his death was a Member of the Council. In addition to the above prize essay, the deceased had contributed several papers to the journals, and one of especial merit on the Physiology of the Excito-Motory System, in the " Transactions" of the Medical Society of London, of which in-’ -’ stitution he had been elected President. Of Mr. Pilcher it may well be said he never made an enemy or lost a friend. Medical News. ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS.-The following gentle- men having undergone the necessary examinations for the diploma, were admitted Members of the College at the meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 2nd inst. :- ADDISON, GEORGE, Uxbridge. BLASSON, THOMAS, Billingborough, Lincolnshire. DAViES, JOHN REDFERN, Birmingham. HEwITT, WILLIAM GODFREY, Melbourne, Australia. KEESS, JAMES, Madras. MUSTARD, JOHN, Wivenhoe, Colchester. WRIGHT, JOHN HODGSON, Army. APOTHECARIES’ HALL.-Names of gentlemen who passed their examination in the science and practice of Medicine, and received certificates to practise, on- Thursday, Novenmber Ist, 1855. FENDICK, ROBERT, Bristol. JONES,.EDWIN, Blackfriars-road. LAWSON, GEORGE, Egremont. MICHELL, GEORGE, Cambourne, Cornwall. MouNCEY, JAMES AINLEY, Manchester. DEATH FROM CHLOROFORM.-Another victim has to be added to the list of those who have already died through the effects of this powerful agent, and that in Edinburgh, where it first sprung into notice. On the 30th ult., a lady from the country, attended by her husband, sought the professional ser- vices of Dr. Roberts, dentist, in that city. Chloroform was administered at her own request, and fatal consequences en- sued, notwithstanding every effort being used to avert such a catastrophe. While cases have occurred in all directions, Edinburgh has seemingly enjoyed an immunity hitherto from anything of the sort. The disgraceful state of the law in Scot- land, in dispensing with the coroner’s inquest, prevents any scientific investigation being made. In all cases like the present, it would be but just and proper that every pub- licity be given them, and that for the sole purpose of extending to all a warning against the use of such an agent in any but cases of the most urgent necessity. Low RATE OF MORTALITY IN SURREY.-A district comprises the parishes of Godalming, Compton and Wan- borough, with a united population of 7000 souls, extending over an area of 12,000 acres. The number of deaths for the quarter ending Sept. 30th was only 8, the average numbers for other quarters being about 22. Of these 8 deaths, 2 were acci- dental, 1 caused by drowning, and 1 by a slip of earth upon the railway now in course of formation.

DEATH OF MR. GEORGE PILCHER

  • Upload
    lamdat

  • View
    217

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: DEATH OF MR. GEORGE PILCHER

452

merous and increasing family. Some months ago he hadsymptoms of paralysis; the right index and middle fingerbecame benumbed, and he lost the power of extension overthem. His declining health now began to excite the anxietyof his friends. Often have I endeavoured to induce him torelax his arduous labours, but his usual reply was, " Thepressing wants of my family make it impossible for me to doso." He continued therefore to toil on until the evening ofthe 13th October, when, after returning home at seven P.M.,he became exhausted, and was placed in a warm bed. Aboutan hour from this time he was seized with hemiplegia of theright side, his speech became thick and indistinct, he graduallymerged into coma, and died on the 16th Oct., at six P.M., atthe early age of forty-two, leaving a wife and eleven childrentotally unprovided for. He was possessed of a cultivatedintellect, was attached to literature, and his professionalattainments were above the usual order. He was kind andconsiderate in his profession, an affectionate husband, and fondand anxious father.

Endeavours are now being made to place two of the youngerchildren in the Infant Hospital Asylum, Wanstead, and twoothers in the London Orphan Asylum. It is also desired, ifpossible, to procure admission for two of the boys into the RoyalMedical Benevolent College, and it is hoped that those whohave votes or interest in either of the above charities will

kindly place them at my disposal in furtherance of the aboveobject.

THE SURGERY OF THE WAR.

THE SANITARY CONDITION OF THE BRITISH ARMYIN THE CRIMEA

DURING THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 20TH.

THE Inspector-General of Hospitals states :-The health ofthe army in general is good, but some cases of cholera have eoccurred, and 25 have proved fatal. From the change of windto the southward, apprehensions were entertained at the closeof last week that this would take place; but the disease hasbeen confined to those recently landed in the country, and 8out of the 25 deaths occurred in the Land Transport Corps,which has recently been augmented by large drafts from Eng-land. The 82nd Regiment, recently arrived from Corfu, isalso suffering from diarrhoea, and one fatal case of cholera hasoccurred in it during the week; but in the 82nd, like the LandTransport Corps, the disease has been confined chiefly to therecruits who have recently joined the regiment.Drunkenness, I am sorry to say, is very common, and theincreased pay favours it; many of the bowel complaints andfebrile affections may be fairly traced, the medical officersthink, to this cause, and it is an evil that will be found diffi-cult to check. The men are employed in road-making andother fatigues, but the night duty is light, and their wants arefully supplied. Huts are arriving daily, and as they arrivethey are put up in the different divisions, and before the wintersets in I hope they will have replaced the tents altogether.The admissions to strength this week have been in the ratio

of 2 ’83 per cent. ; the deaths to strength, 0 11 per cent. ; sickto healthy, 8’0 per cent.; exclusive of wounds, 5’88 per cent.

THE PRACTICE OF SUR6ERT IN THE CAMP.

Extract of a Letter from the Camp before Sebastopol, Oct. 1855." If you knew the occupation I have had on account of the

number of wounded men under my care, you would, I know,excuse mv apparent neglect in not answering your kind letters.The attack on the 8th of September gave me, in my regimentalhospital, nearly 150 wounded, and I have still upwards of 80remaining. Moreover, in our service there is such a vastamount of pen-and-ink work-much more than you couldcredit-that I cannot do many things more useful that I wishto do. I regret much I have not more time at my disposal. Iam not idle, I assure you. I sent away five invalids to-day toEngland, and I have had twenty-four documents to write outwith these five men !-one, for all practical purposes, shouldhave been enough.’’

NEW LUNACY COMMISSIONER.-The Lord Chancellorhas appointed Dr. James Wilkes, of the Staffordshire LunaticAsylum, to the Commissionership in Lunacy, vacant by theresignation of Dr. Turner.

DEATH OF MR. GEORGE PILCHER.

Tms estimable member of the profession expired suddenlyon Wednesday evening, at his residence, Harley-street,Cavendish-square, aged fifty-four. Mr. Pilcher had only justreturned home from the delivery of his lecture on surgery tothe students of St. George’s School of Medicine, when seizedwith his fatal illness. The lamented deceased was admitted amember of the Royal College of Surgeons on the 2nd of April,1824, and commenced the practice of his profession in Dean-street, Soho. Here, however, he did not succeed so well as heexpected, and a vacancy occurring at the Webb-street Schoolof the lectureship on Anatomy and Surgery, he offered himselfas a candidate, and was duly elected, and soon became a greatfavourite with the students. He was soon after appointedSurgeon to the Surrey Dispensary, not, however, without in-curring the expense of making 300 votes; and removing toGreat George-street, Westminster, soon rose rapidly into esti-mation as a most successful aurist, and obtained the Fother-gillian Prize for his " Treatise on the Structure and Pathologyof the Ear." In 1843, Mr. Pilcher was elected a Fellow ofthe College, and at the time of his death was a Member of theCouncil. In addition to the above prize essay, the deceased hadcontributed several papers to the journals, and one of especialmerit on the Physiology of the Excito-Motory System, in the" Transactions" of the Medical Society of London, of which in-’ -’

stitution he had been elected President. Of Mr. Pilcher it

may well be said he never made an enemy or lost a friend.

Medical News.ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS.-The following gentle-

men having undergone the necessary examinations for the

diploma, were admitted Members of the College at the meetingof the Court of Examiners on the 2nd inst. :-

ADDISON, GEORGE, Uxbridge.BLASSON, THOMAS, Billingborough, Lincolnshire.DAViES, JOHN REDFERN, Birmingham.HEwITT, WILLIAM GODFREY, Melbourne, Australia.KEESS, JAMES, Madras.MUSTARD, JOHN, Wivenhoe, Colchester.WRIGHT, JOHN HODGSON, Army.

APOTHECARIES’ HALL.-Names of gentlemen whopassed their examination in the science and practice of Medicine,and received certificates to practise, on-

Thursday, Novenmber Ist, 1855.FENDICK, ROBERT, Bristol.JONES,.EDWIN, Blackfriars-road.LAWSON, GEORGE, Egremont.MICHELL, GEORGE, Cambourne, Cornwall.MouNCEY, JAMES AINLEY, Manchester.

DEATH FROM CHLOROFORM.-Another victim has to beadded to the list of those who have already died through theeffects of this powerful agent, and that in Edinburgh, where itfirst sprung into notice. On the 30th ult., a lady from thecountry, attended by her husband, sought the professional ser-vices of Dr. Roberts, dentist, in that city. Chloroform wasadministered at her own request, and fatal consequences en-sued, notwithstanding every effort being used to avert such acatastrophe. While cases have occurred in all directions,Edinburgh has seemingly enjoyed an immunity hitherto fromanything of the sort. The disgraceful state of the law in Scot-land, in dispensing with the coroner’s inquest, prevents anyscientific investigation being made. In all cases like the

present, it would be but just and proper that every pub-licity be given them, and that for the sole purpose of extending to all a warning against the use of such an agent in any butcases of the most urgent necessity.Low RATE OF MORTALITY IN SURREY.-A district

comprises the parishes of Godalming, Compton and Wan-borough, with a united population of 7000 souls, extendingover an area of 12,000 acres. The number of deaths for thequarter ending Sept. 30th was only 8, the average numbers forother quarters being about 22. Of these 8 deaths, 2 were acci-dental, 1 caused by drowning, and 1 by a slip of earth uponthe railway now in course of formation.