City of Cape Town Council Overview

  • View
    77

  • Download
    5

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

A comprehensive guide to Councils structures, finance, governance, directorates and planning

Transcript

City of Cape Town

Council Overview

A comprehensive guide to Councils structures, finance, governance, directorates and planning June 2011

CITY UF CAPE TUWN ISIXEKO SASEKAPA STAIJ KAAPSTAD

THIS CITY WORKS FOR YOU

his handbook introduces the City of Cape Town. It provides important orientation information regarding the municipality, its nances, service delivery and capital programmes, and key issues that will be addressed by the new Council. The City is a large, complex and diversied organisation, with a proposed 2011/12 budget of R27,1 billion, which is inclusive of the operating budget of R22 billion. The City has more than 220 councillors and 25 000 staff serving 3,7 million residents across a sprawling and diverse metro of 2 500 square kilometres. The Administration delivers services such as water, electricity, waste removal, sanitation, new infrastructure, roads, public spaces, facilities, housing developments, the upgrade of informal settlements and existing infrastructure, clinics, and more. This city relies heavily on the team work between its elected councillors and the staff in its Administration, and understanding the Citys role and how it works is essential in contributing to successful service delivery. Councillors and political ofce bearers bring external knowledge, experience, and an understanding of the needs of their ward and communities to the City. The policy decisions and resolutions of Council guide the staff and provide them with the mandate to deliver services. Effective service delivery requires an Administration with institutional knowledge, expertise, experience, nancial sustainability, a can do attitude and good governance measures.

T

A city that runs smoothly contributes to economic growth and job opportunities by attracting businesses and investments, and here Cape Town has notched up major achievements. It successfully hosted the FIFA 2010 Soccer World Cup and gained more than R13 billions worth of new infrastructure in doing so and is recognised as Africas leading tourism, investment and lifestyle destination. However, despite the successes signicant challenges, gaps and needs remain. There is no room for complacency, and a partnership approach between the Council and the Administration is essential. This is based on different, clear roles and responsibilities, a system of delegated authority, an onerous legal and nancial framework. It also requires mutual respect for each others objectives and deliverables. Stable local government where there is continuity, sharing of institutional and external knowledge, joint objectives and efforts all vital for service delivery to all residents. I trust that this publication will give every councillor, ofce bearer, role-player and stakeholder valuable information, context and insight into a city we are immensely proud of.

Achmat Ebrahim City Manager

CITY OF CAPE TOWN COUNCIL OVERVIEW 2011

1

GLOSSARY

PLANNING

DIRECTORATES

GOVERNANCE

FINANCE

STRUCTURE

OVERVIEW

Foreword

Contents3 9Overview of the City of Cape Town4 5 A brief history of the City Demographic and socio-economic overview

Political and administrative structuresThe City of Cape Town is a metropolitan municipality that employs more than 25 000 staff, who serve 3,7 million residents across a 2 400 km2 area. Cape Town is governed by a 221-member city council, which elects the Executive Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Speaker. The City administration is led by the City Manager, supported by an Executive Management Team. 10 Overview of political governance structures 13 Overview of the City administration 14 The Citys staff complement

17 21 25

Finance and budgetIn the coming nancial year, the City will spend R27,1 billion on providing services for its residents, and investing in its long-term strategy of infrastructure-led growth and development. The Citys functions, service delivery and growth are not possible without effective revenue collection and expenditure, excellent nancial management and reporting, and viable and sustainable budgeting.

GovernanceThe City of Cape Town is funded by public money, and is therefore expected to exercise the highest levels of corporate governance. This goes far beyond compliance with the extensive and comprehensive legislation the Citys governance systems are designed to meet or exceed the highest professional standards and recommendations.

The Citys directoratesThe Citys service delivery sectors are divided into 12 directorates, each with focused and clear roles and responsibilities. They provide organisational support, services and infrastructure to residents across the metro. Each is responsible for its own planning and budget in accordance with the Citys overall strategy. 27 Ofce of the City Manager 47 Health 29 Internal Audit 49 Housing 31 Community Services 53 Safety & Security 35 Corporate Services 57 Strategy & Planning 61 Transport, Roads & Major Projects 39 Economic, Social Development & Tourism 65 Utility Services 43 Finance

69

Plans, frameworks and strategiesIn order to meet the needs of its residents and provide a foundation for growth and development, the City has developed several important plans, frameworks and strategies. These range from the ve-year Integrated Development Plan (IDP) to strategies for improving transport. Some of these have been approved, and others are being developed for submission to appropriate Council forums. 75 Integrated Transport Plan 70 Integrated Development Plan 76 Cape Town Spatial Development Framework 71 Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 77 Infrastructure Asset Management Plan 72 Annual and quarterly reporting 78 Draft Events Strategy 73 Local Government Turnaround Strategy 79 Draft Economic and Human Development Strategy 74 City Development Strategy

81

Glossary

The content of the report is as at the end of the term of ofce of the previous Council and administration. Produced by the Communication Department of the City of Cape Town. Editing, design and production: The Creative Store. Photographs: Bruce Sutherland and Jan du Plessis. Printing: Frantic Digital

2

CITY OF CAPE TOWN COUNCIL OVERVIEW 2011

The City of Cape Town, as a metro municipality, is just ten years old, but as South Africas oldest city, it has a municipal governance and service delivery heritage that dates back more than 300 years. Council is responsible for continuing and strengthening this proud tradition, and delivering the best infrastructure, services and economic opportunities to Cape Towns 3,7 million residents.In this section A brief history of the City Demographics and socio-economic overview CITY OF CAPE TOWN COUNCIL OVERVIEW 2011 3

GLOSSARY

PLANNING

DIRECTORATES

GOVERNANCE

FINANCE

STRUCTURE

OVERVIEW

Overview of the City of Cape Town

A brief history of the CityKEY DATES The rst Council meeting was held on 8 April 1652 on a sailing ship. A legislative council was formed in 1834. In 1838, the rst municipality, covering Green Point and Sea Point, was formed. The Cape Town Municipality was established in 1840. In 1900, there were 11 local authorities, but by 1913, eight of these merged into Cape Town. By 1994, Greater Cape Town had 39 local authorities and 19 administrations. In 1996, these 58 entities were merged into seven. These seven entities were merged into the City of Cape Town on 4 December 2000. he City of Cape Town as the municipal entity of today is just over ten years old. However, the Mother City has the oldest municipal structure in the country, going back to its rst Council meeting held on 8 April 1652 on a sailing ship anchored in Table Bay. Three days before, Jan van Riebeeck and a party of around 200 men and women had arrived to set up a replenishment station for the Dutch East India Company Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie (VOC). This council of policy meeting, to decide on the layout and construction schedule for a vegetable garden, settlement and a fort was held on board the Dromedaris, as there were not yet structures on land. From company settlement to colony The VOC administered the settlement as a business, not as a civic entity. Residents did, over time, acquire increasing representation on the council of policy, and on the councils that managed public safety and hygiene. However, the VOCs fortunes eventually faded, and the Company collapsed in 1798. Administratively, Cape Town became a Dutch colony. The Capes position on the trade route to the East Indies made it strategically and economically important, and it changed hands several times. British forces captured Cape Town in 1795, but it was returned to the Netherlands by treaty in 1803. Cape Town, by then a possession of the Batavian Republic and managed by a governor and an executive council of four salaried ofcials, was granted the status of a town, complete with a coat of arms. Britain occupied the Cape again in 1806 following the Battle of Blaauwberg, and in 1814, the Cape was ceded to Britain, and became the capital of the newly formed Cape Colony. To manage the new administrative capital, a legislative council was formed in 1834. The municipal era This was followed, in 1838, by the creation of a municipality covering Green Point and Sea Point. On 3 March 1840, the Cape Town Municipality was established, to administer a town with a population of 20 016 people. The Board of Commissioners and Wardmasters was formed to shape regulations for the town, regulate income and expenditure, and set property rates. In the following year, the villages of Mowbray, Rondebosch, Claremont and Wynberg combined to form the Liesbeek Municipality. In 1886, however, Wynberg broke away, followed shortly afterwa