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CIA Improvised Sabotage Devices ... EXPLOSIVES FOR SABOTAGE Commercial and military explosives of n. sort or another are in use around the alobe l}y far lh* mosl desirable ones for

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Text of CIA Improvised Sabotage Devices ... EXPLOSIVES FOR SABOTAGE Commercial and military explosives of n....

  • A

    ~*&*J. CIA

    IMPROVISED -/

    SABOTAGE DEVICES

    .1

    * $

  • CONTENTS

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    iw

    Page

    INTRODUCTION , 1 EXPLOSIVES FOR SABOTAGE 3 STANDARD FIRING SYSTEMS 5

    General 5

    Nonelectric Firing 5

    Electric Firing 6

    Primacord fi

    IMPROVISED FIRING SYSTEMS 11 General II

    Electric Pressure Switch I

    J

    Water-Drip Electric Delay 12

    Expansion Electric Delay 13

    Pocket Watch Electric Djlay 13

    Seven Day Electric Delay 1-*

    Electric Pull- Release 15

    Electric Tilting Mercury Switch 16

    Mousetrap Electric Release 16

    Electric Pull-Slide Switch 17

    Acid and Rubber Chemical Delay 18

    Chemical Instantaneous Initiator 19

    Fuse Lighter Nonelectric Pull 20

    Fuse Lighter Nonelectric Pressure 21

    IMPROVISED DETONATORS 23 General 23

    Improvised Rifle Detonator , . ............. 23 Frag Grenade Detonator . .-26

    STEEL CUTTING TECHNIQUES 27 General 27

    Rule of Thumb for Structural Steel 27 Cutting Steel .Sara and Shafts 29

    STANDARD CHARGE 31 DERAILMENT TECHNIQUES 33

    Genera] 33

    Hasty Derailment Method . . 33

    Concealed Cratering System 35

    IMPROVISED CRATERING EXPLOSIVE 37 CONE SHAPED CHARGES , . , . . 39

    General - 39

    Martini Glass Shaped Charge 39

    Wine UotrJf Shaped Charge 42

    PLATTER CHARGE 43 COUNTERFORCE CHARGES -*5 DIAMOND CHARGE 47 CABLE CUtT.ER 4Q

  • AMBUSH OR ANTIPERSONNEL CHARGES 51 Scatter Charge 5I

    Frag Grenade Ambuah 5I

    Improvised Frag Grenade 52

    Mortar Shell Ambush 54

    Vehicle Booby Trap 54

    THE 3.5 ROCKET 57

    Ceneral " Placed Charges °7

    Improvised Electric Launching S8

    Nonelectric Launehinp 60

    Ranges and Aiming . . • J 1

    IMPROVISED INCENDIARIES ™ General

    J? | Potasaium Chlorate and

    Sugar Igniter 63

    Flake Aluminum-Sulfur Igniter • • • - ft4

    Homemade Mac*. Powder Igniter W Match Head Igniter ^ Time Fu*e Fire Starter £5 Homemade Napalm Parrafin-Sawdust Incendiary

    Sawdust, Morh Flakes, and Oil Incendiary

    Thermate Incendiary DCS! AND VAPOR I^X PLOSIONS

    General *

    Improx-ised Dual Initiator

    POl . CHARGES Internal Flotation Charge

    External Charge

    TARGET SUMMARY

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  • ILLUSTRATIONS Page

    JFijr. . 1

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    ftfc. 39 -

    I^igv •to -

    nfc 4t - F* 42 - fcfc 4>- Fig. **> Fig. &*

    - Crimping 5 • Lighting Safety Fuse 6 - Electric Cap and Primacord 7 - Primacord Branch Line System 7 • Splices and Knots 8 • Electric Pressure Switch (Lids) II Electric Pressure Switch (Straps) 12 Water-Drip Electric Pelay 12 Expansion Electric Delay 13 Pocket Watch Klectric Delay H Seven Day Electric Delay 14 Electric Pu!t- Release J 3

    Electric Tilting Xterciiry Switch J(S

    Mousetrap Electric Release 17 Electric Pull-Slide Switch IS

    Acid and Rubber Chemical De-lay IH Chemical Instantaneous Initiator 10 Fuse Lighter Nonelectric Pull 20 Fuse Lighter Nonelectric Pressure 21 Improvised Rifle Detonator 24 Removing Grenade Fuse 25 Removing Grenade Detonator 25 Ribbon Charge for Steel . . . 27 Tailored Ribbon Charge 27 Flexible Ribbo.i Charge 28 Saddle Charge 28 Standard Charge 3] Standard Charge Placement 32 Hasty Derailment Charge 33 Hasty Method Placement 34 Concealed Derailment System 3S Removing Glass Stem 30 Martini Glass ChaTge 4U Counterweight Placement 40

    Cutting Wine Bottle 41 Wine Bottle Charge 42 Platter Charge 43 Platter Charge Placement 44 Platter ChargeMine 44 Cquhteribrce; Charge 45 Goujitexftirce* Charge.Placement 45

    Diamond Charge. ' 47 Pfemprid .Charge. Placement 48

    Cable Cutter 50

    Scarcer. Charge .....*.... 51

  • Fig. 46

    Fig. 47

    Fig. 48

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    Fig. 50

    Fig- 51

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    Fig. 58

    Fig. 59

    Fig. ftO

    Fig. 61

    Fig- 62

    Fig. ('>>

    Fig. 64

    Fig. 65

    Page

    — Frag Grenade Charge ......

    »

    52

    .- Improvised Frag Grenade .... 52

    .- Removing Mortar Shell Fuse 53

    — Priming Mortar Shell S3

    .- Vehicle Booby Trap 34

    .- Removing Rocket Hsad 57

    — Removing Rocket Head 58 .- Rocket Shaped Charge 59

    -- Rocket Land Mine • *9

    -- Improvised Rocker Launcher

    — Electric Firing • .- Nonelectric Firing y— Sighting of Rocket * *j2 — Time Fuse Fire Starter "•"> — MoilotOY Cocktail • . .• ' ' .1 — Defusing Thermate Grenade — Dust initiator — Internal Flotation"i Charge — Soap Box Charge ,. — Cigar Box Charge •

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  • INTRODUCTION!

    For u.uice a 'ew y* ara now

    * considerable

    amounts of time, effort, and money have been

    expended on Improving older sabotage de-

    vices and accessory gear and in developing

    neW and better items. As a result, a wide

    variety of manufactured explosive and

    cendiary items is available for use.

    in-

    At the same time fl somewhat smaller

    effort has been devoted to improvising and

    testing homemade or field expedient de-

    vices and techniques for accomplishing simi-

    lar results.

    Since the manufactured, precision devices

    almost always will be more effective, more

    reliable, and easier to use, why spend time

    on improvising field expedients to do the

    job?

    For one thing shelf items will just not he

    available for certain operations for security

    or logistical reasons. In these cases the

    operator will have to rely on materials he

    can buy in a drug or paint store, find in a

    junk pile, or scrounge from military stocks.

    Secondly, many of the ingredients and

    materials used in fabricating homemade items

    are so commonplace or innocuous they can

    be carried without arousing suspicion. The

    completed item itself often is more easily

    concealed or camouflaged.

    in addition, the field expedient item can be

    tailored for the intended target, thereby pro-

    viding an advantage over the standard item

    in flexibility and versatility.

    While moat of the pertinent information

    on sabotage shelf items is available in cata-

    logues and other publications, much of the lm-- provisation know-how has remained in the

    minds or files of a few individuals.

    It Is the intent of this manual to consoli-

    date and bring up to date a selected body of

    this information and make it available for

    wider use.

    The devices and techniques included have

    been selected because they have been well

    proved out and because they are practical,

    versatile, and not too difficult to do. Other

    techniques have been omitted because they

    are too unreliable or are just too hazardous

    to attempt except under the most carefully

    controlled conditions.

    The techniques descrihed are not so com-

    plex as to require a chemical laboratory or

    machine shop; however, many of them do as-

    sume access to basic demolitions and incen-

    diary supplies, such as explosives, time

    (safety) fuse, detonating cord, blasting caps,

    and flammable materials, and to a few house-

    hold tools.

    This manual is not intended to stand com-

    pletely on its own as a substitute for in-

    struction, nor la it a text on basic demoli-

    tions. Its chief value should be to aid an

    instructor who already has a working know-

    ledge of the subject in his training of action

    personnel. It also will serve as a refresher

    and guide to individuals who have been

    trained in these techniques but whose facility

    has declined from disuse.

    i

  • EXPLOSIVES FOR SABOTAGE

    Commercial and military explosives of

    n . sort or another are in use around the

    a lobe l}y far lh*

    mosl desirable ones for

    sabotage purposes are the military plastic

    explosives and TNT.

    Plastic explosives vary in composition

    and go by different names. The U.S. mili-

    iarv has two versions: C-3 and C-4. The

    llrltish call theirs PE-2 and the Italians

    T.4. Other names Used are RDX and, es-

    pecially in Europe, Hexagen and Cyclonite.

    TNT may be called by its full chemical

    name. Trinitrotoluene, or it may be referred

    io as Tolite, Trotyl, or TOL.

    Both plastic explosives and TNT have the

    advantage of being; very powerful while at the

    same t

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