Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective Principal Leadership ... ... Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective Principal Leadership ... ... Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective

  • Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective Principal Leadership of English Language

    Development Instruction

    By

    Jeremy Brian Hilinski

    A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of

    Doctor of Education

    in the

    Graduate Division

    of the

    University of California, Berkeley

    Committee in charge:

    Professor Heinrich Mintrop, Chair

    Professor Patricia P. Baquedano-Lopez

    Professor Susan I. Stone

    Fall 2015

  • Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective Principal Leadership of English Language

    Development Instruction

    © 2015

    By

    Jeremy Brian Hilinski

  • 1

    ABSTRACT

    Beyond Compliance: Toward Effective Principal Leadership of English Language

    Development Instruction

    By

    Jeremy Brian Hilinski

    Doctor of Education

    University of California, Berkeley

    Heinrich Mintrop, Ph.D., Chair

    English Language Development instruction (ELD) is at the forefront of scrutiny in many schools and districts at-large. Within the Bay Vista Unified School District (BVUSD), a storied history, highlighted by a class-action lawsuit and resulting consent decree, has set the context for large scale decision making around language instruction and how schools are held accountable. Lau v. Nichols (1974) began with a group of Chinese-American families alleging that the school district failed to provide the necessary language instruction to provide access for English learners to the core curriculum, much of which was presented in English. The result of the litigation was a lengthy consent decree mandating that BVUSD provide a minimum number of minutes of daily focused ELD instruction. District officials worked under the intense monitoring of a federal court judge to hold all schools accountable for the provision of this ELD instruction daily. Principals quickly became tasked with formulating a structure at school for leveled ELD instruction and a system to monitor its implementation. Items to be monitored heavily involved classroom environmental tenets of “quality” instruction.

    Forty years later, Lau is still alive in BVUSD and principals, among the many other roles they play, are still responsible for this compliance-driven task of monitoring ELD instruction. The prevailing principal support, at the district level, is in the professional development on how to use the district’s monitoring tool to assess the level of implementation of ELD in classrooms.

    The following design development study aimed to shift principal practice beyond simply monitoring for compliance into a practice of understanding the instructional indicators of effective ELD instruction and how to observe for them, thus building the capacity to acknowledge compliance, but observe and offer feedback to teachers on the highest leverage instructional tenets of truly high quality ELD instruction. The three dimensions of this design include an awareness of compliance orientation, a shared understanding of the principals’ loci of control, and the technical competence necessary to move practice forward, from environmental/compliance driven observations to instructionally sound ones. The intervention design involves ten one-hour sessions designed to have principals engage in a reflection on their reliance on compliance, come to a shared understanding of the principal locus of control, goal setting, skill building, and working toward efficacy. Through these design features and intervention activities, principals became aware of their reliance on compliance, what they, themselves, could actually impact in instruction, were able to engage in goal setting, and actually engaged in observations though the lenses of an acknowledgment of compliance and focus on instructional effectiveness.

  • i

    DEDICATION

    This dissertation, along with the countless hours of class, research group, reading, and

    refinement, is dedicated to my beautiful, supportive, thoughtful, and all-around lovely family. For

    my wife, Andi, and all of her patience with me during these long hours and longer weeks. You’ve

    been the best partner in life and have created such a supportive environment for me to read and

    write. It’s hard to believe that, during LEEP, we had two kids, sold a condo, bought a house, and

    engaged in a six month renovation while living in a vacation rental. Here’s to our Pacifica house,

    which exemplifies our focus on family. For Anna Banana, who was born following the first LEEP

    summer of classes. You’ve been my swimming partner on non-LEEP weekends and have brought

    such humor, wisdom, and adorable spirit into the lives of mommy and daddy. For Julia, who was

    born during research group, almost three years later, and has filled our lives with the happiest

    sleepless nights any parent could ask for. For Grammy and Grampy, whose bi-weekly visits kept

    our family together and supported during LEEP weekends, orals prep, and in the development of

    this dissertation. I couldn’t have done it without you two amazing people. For Rose, my teacher,

    mentor, and inspiration in so many aspects of this privileged life I’ve lived. I’m bi-literate due in

    such large part to you and I’m an educator because I wanted to be like you when I grew up. For the

    Hilinskis, who always made higher education an expectation and not an option. You gave me every

    tool I ever needed to be successful in so many endeavors. I’m a better person because of my family.

  • ii

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………1

    Dedication…………………………………………………………………………………………i

    Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………………ii-v

    List of Figures…………………………………………………………………………………....vi

    List of Tables……………………………………………………………………………….vii-viii

    Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………………….ix

    Chapter One: Problem of Practice and the Professional Knowledge Base………………...1-16

    Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………..1

    English Learners within the California Student Population……………………………………….1-2

    English Language Development and Social Justice……………………………………………….2-3

    California Proposition 63 – “Official English” ………………………………………………..3-4

    California Proposition 187 – “Save our State” …………………………………………………..4

    California Proposition 227 – “English for the Children” ……………………………………….4-5

    Lau v. Nichols (1974) ………………………………………………………………………..5

    A Storied History in California Schools for English Learners……………………………………5-6

    Problem of Practice and Design Challenge……………………………………………………...….6

    Consulting the Professional Knowledge Base…………………………………………………...6-16

    The Leveled English Language Development (ELD) Block………………………………………..7

    High Inference Classroom Observation……………………………………………………...…7-8

    Feedback following Observation………………………………………………………...…….8-9

    ELD Professional Development……………………………………………………………..….9

    Compliance Orientation………………………………………………………………..…...9-10

    Desirable Patterns of ELD with Strong Principal Leadership and Ongoing Support…………...10-16

    ELD Taught within the Context of Content…………………………………………….…...11-12

    Low Inference Classroom Observation…………………………………………………….…12-13

    Effective Feedback……………………………………………………………………….…..13

  • iii

    Ongoing Professional Development with Coaching Support………………………………….….13-14

    Four Domains of Principal Professional Development…………………………………………14-15

    Principal Focus on ELD Content Knowledge……………………………………………………16

    Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………..16

    Chapter Two: Theory of Action……………………………………………………………..17-23

    Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………17

    Theory of Action………………………………………………………………………………17-18

    Theory of Change and Intervention…………………………………………