BANKSIDE GALLERY

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NEWSLETTER SPRING 2016

Text of BANKSIDE GALLERY

  • ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    BANKSIDE

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETYROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETYROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    spring issue 2016

    galleryROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETY

    BANKSIDEGALLERY

    ROYAL WATERCOLOUR SOCIETYROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTER-PRINTMAKERS

    SPRING ISSUE 2016

  • All of the visual arts are built around basic principles. While sculpture may focus on three-dimensionality and form, photography on composition and light and textiles on surface and texture, it might be said that colour is at the very heart of all painting, so inextricably linked to the art form that the two cannot be separated. Throughout history, colour in painting has carried great weight and signifi cance. Individual colours have come to symbolise various states: emotion, virtue or vice, that are now engrained in our culture; white - purity, red passion and yellow - hope. Colours can also indicate nationality, wealth, historical period or status. With every country and culture the meaning, technique and reception may alter and yet the importance of colour does not diminish.

    However, contemporary artists creation of colour has differed a great deal from its origins as many as 100,000 years ago. As Victoria Finlay points out in her book, Colour, we no longer have to grind a rock, or powder a root, or burn a twig, or crush a dried insect to create the desired pigment. This may be to the relief of many a painter who is now able to concentrate solely on the creation of their work but for others it has distanced them from their chosen media. Royal Watercolour Society Member David Brayne may be put into the latter category:

    Modern science has extended the range of colours open to us but manufactur-ers tend to offer only those products which are most commercially viable. Many painters fi nd these insuffi cient for their needs. Francis Bacon added dust from his studio floor to his paint and Miguel Barcelo, a Spanish painter living in Paris, burns car tyres to create a black transparent pigment. I have dug deep down in my garden in search of the famous Somerset iron oxide; my local equivalent of raw Siena. I particularly enjoy using iron oxides. They appear dull in their dry, powdery state but as soon I mix them with gum arabic solution or with an acrylic medium they come alive. As I gently rub them with a soft cloth onto the surface of the paper they become clear, bright, transparent oranges, reds and bluey blacks. They are lightfast and mix easily with other pigments or with tube paints; the most beautiful of colours and dirt cheap.

    Spring Exhibition

  • John Newberrys practice has taken him all over the globe, from the warmer climes of Malta and Sri Lanka to the mountains of the Swiss Alps and the fjords of Norway. These environments all have their own distinctive light qualities and varying ranges of colour, and Newberry seeks to represent these unique tones as honestly as his paint will allow:

    Take a fresh poinsettia. Try to give the colour in the painting the same brilliance as the scarlet bracts.

    Ask the questions is the red a redder red then the green is green? In other words, which colour is the more intense?

    One method is to surround it with its complimentary, to emphasise the greens and the turquoises as contrast. This is the accepted practice. But another is to call it a red picture, to make everything reddish, the whites become pink, the blacks a purple red, green so un-colourful as to be almost black. I decided on the second by experiment years ago try it.

    Bridget Moores dream-like works rely on colour to convey a sense of memory and evoke the atmosphere of a time gone by. The rich hues coupled with the themes of fantasy, theatre, circus and fairgrounds create an aesthetic experience which enables the viewer to delve into another time. A variety of yellows can often be seen in Moores gouache paintings; mustard, sand, mango and fleshy beige feature regularly giving the works an almost sepia tonality, reinforcing the themes of memory and childhood. She says of her use of colour:

    I fi nd colour magical. Beautiful sublime colour is mouth-watering. When young I was preoccupied with getting colours to work together, creating a balance. I still want to achieve an overall harmony, but Im more experimental, juxtaposing colour against colour to create intimate scenes to draw the viewer in, with colour dictating the mood and feeling in my work. I build my paintings by layering colours, small amounts placed to lift, or peppering a larger area to change the energy of it, to warm or cool, quieten or zing,

  • enhance or camouflage depending on the amount and inten-sity. I enjoy colour combinations that I pick up on, out and about, on TV, other peoples colours that I envy and wonder could I make that work invariably I cant and have to stick with what comes intuitively or by happy accident and capital-ise on that.

    Much like the Scottish Colourists before her, Ann Wegmuller takes her colour inspiration from nature. Born in the coastal town of Gourock, west Scotland, much of Wegmullers life has been spent by the sea and it is in this land- and seascape that she finds constant motivation.

    I have often been asked about my use of colour and the easy answer to this is that colour is mood. This is basically true but it is also a physical reality and is often seen in the traditional landscapes of summer and winter. All these things are of course an influence but my personal use of colour represents how I feel about a place or situation. The pictorial reality of it is of no interest but rather the shapes and colours that are there.

    I saturate the paper in red or yellow paint and then work on the surface. This sets the scene in my mind and allows me to compose the subject matter. I build my painting up by drawing in colour. A cool lemon yellow into red or orange or a cool or warm blue on an ochre ground allows me to describe my subject. This painting Shore Song (see cover image) is about the seaside which was my adventure playground as a child, rocks, rock pools, marine plants and of course sticks of rock and candy floss.

    The darker colours are often a reflection on the history of a place. They do not necessarily represent a dark mood. I find it quite interesting to work in dark colours and the remains of the black houses I saw on Lewis in the Outer Hebrides lent themselves to this.

    The RWS Spring Exhibition, Made in Colour, will be open 11am 6pm daily from 24 March 23 April.

    John Newberry RWS, Poinsettia, watercolour

    Ann Wegmuller RWS, The Bay, gouache & charcoal

    Bridget Moore RWS, The Checked Robe, gouache

    Hatty Davidson

  • WENDY JACOB RWS /// INTERVIEW

    Wendy Jacob paints almost exclusively in gouache, an opaque form of the traditionally translucent watercolour. Her work explores the everyday and the domestic, bringing a graphic vitality to the most ordinary scenes. Wendy is Featured Artist in the RWS Spring Exhibition: Made in Colour.

    Early artistic education has the habit of deeply affecting an artist and in this, Wendy is no different: I always loved drawing as a child at home and at school. Fortunately, my seri-ously academic secondary school also had very a good Art Department where Peggy Angus, a close friend of Ravilious, was in charge. I went on to Hammersmith School of Art where Ruskin Spear taught an evening life painting class, and Bernard Cohen ran the Basic Design course based on the Paul Klee teachings at the Bauhaus.

    These early introductions to figures of such great artistic in-fluence were profound and Wendy continued her education at Hammersmith, going on to complete a course in Mural Design a multi-media course which included stained glass, painting in both tempera and oil, mosaics and even some plastic moulding. One can see the particular influence of stained glass and mosaic in Wendys current practice where defined shapes are brought together using strong flat colour and line to create a scene where decorative qualities are favoured over realism. However, she says that it was the drawing skills that she acquired during these years which she would go on to rely on most heavily.

    After graduating in 1963, Wendy entered the world of work and was approached by a friend who was looking for an artist to produce a hundred small drawings for a design company catalogue Goods and Chattels. The fee was a pound for each drawing (they had approached David Gentleman, who was very well known then, as now, who had asked for much more)