August 2009 UCOP Safety Meeting Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses University of California Office of the President

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  • August 2009 UCOP Safety Meeting Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses University of California Office of the President
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat-Related Fatalities Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Between 1999 to 2003 3442 Heat-Related Fatalities in the U.S. Between 1999 to 2003 3442 Heat-Related Fatalities in the U.S. Average Approximately 690 Deaths per Year Average Approximately 690 Deaths per Year Large Percentage of the Fatalities: Large Percentage of the Fatalities: MalesMales ElderlyElderly
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Production of Heat in Your Body Body Produces/Stores More Heat Than You Lose Metabolism/Exercise Metabolism/Exercise Heat Absorbed Radiant Energy Sun, HeaterSun, Heater
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Body Cooling Mechanism The Body Attempts to Maintain an Internal Temperature of 98.6 o F By: Increased Blood Circulation Which Results in More Blood to the Skin Increased Blood Circulation Which Results in More Blood to the Skin Increases Temperature of the Skin Allows Body Rid Itself of the Excess HeatIncreases Temperature of the Skin Allows Body Rid Itself of the Excess Heat Sweating (Perspiration) Sweating (Perspiration) Sweat Evaporates Cooling of the SkinSweat Evaporates Cooling of the Skin
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Illness Prevention Drink Fluids Consume Plenty of Fluids 2 to 4 Glasses/Hour 2 to 4 Glasses/Hour Thirst Unreliable Indicator of Dehydration Avoid Alcohol, Caffeine, or High Sugar Beverages Diuretics Consult Physician If On a Limited Fluid Regiment or If Taking Water Pills
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Illness Prevention Acclimation Slow Process for the Body to Condition Itself to Heat Slow Process for the Body to Condition Itself to Heat May Take Up to 10 Days May Take Up to 10 Days Quickly Lost in a Matter of Days Quickly Lost in a Matter of Days Conditioning/General Health Stay in Shape, Exercise Regularly Stay in Shape, Exercise Regularly Watch Your Weight Watch Your Weight
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Preventive Measures Stay Indoors in an Air Conditioned (A/C) Place If Home is Not A/C - Go to A/C Public Place Electric Fans - Effective Up to the Upper 90s Cool Bath/Shower or Move to A/C Location Cool Bath/Shower or Move to A/C Location Wear Light Weight, Light Colored, Loose Fitting Clothes Never Leave Anyone in Parked Closed Vehicles Temperatures Can Reach 120 o F in 10 Minutes Temperatures Can Reach 120 o F in 10 Minutes Since 1998, > 230 Child Fatalities Since 1998, > 230 Child Fatalities
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Preventive Measures If You Must Be Outdoors in the Heat Try to Limit the Activities to Morning or Evening Hours Do Not Engage in or Minimize Strenuous Activities Consume 2 to 4 Glasses of Water Per Hour Rest Often and Stay in Shady Areas Wear Wide Brim Hats
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Persons Most Susceptible to Heat-Related Illnesses Infants and Young Children CDC Recommends Constant Monitoring CDC Recommends Constant Monitoring The Elderly - Persons Who are 65 Years or Older CDC Recommends Checking On the Elderly Twice a Day During Hot Days CDC Recommends Checking On the Elderly Twice a Day During Hot Days Persons with Heart Disease or High Blood Pressure
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting California Heat-Related Occupational Fatalities 2004/2005 5 Fatalities Outdoor Occupations Agriculture & Construction 2005 Cal/OSHA Promulgated a Heat Illness Prevention Standard Title 8, California Code of Regulations, Section 3395 Title 8, California Code of Regulations, Section 3395 Applies Only to Outdoor Environments Applies Only to Outdoor Environments
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Cal/OSHA Heat Illness Prevention Standard When Environmental Factors for Heat Illness are Present Major Components Access to Shade for Recovery Period Access to Shade for Recovery Period Access to Drinking Water Access to Drinking Water Written Program/Emergency Procedures Written Program/Emergency Procedures Training Employees & Supervisors Training Employees & Supervisors
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Stroke Signs & Symptoms High Body Temperature High Body Temperature Hot, Red (Gray) Dry Skin, Rapid Pulse Hot, Red (Gray) Dry Skin, Rapid Pulse Confusion, Loss of Consciousness Confusion, Loss of Consciousness Death is Imminent Death is Imminent First Aid Call 9-1-1 ASAP & Request Ambulance Move to Cool Area Cool with Wet Cloth and Fan the Victim to Increase Cooling If Conscious, Slowly Give Cool Water
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Illnesses Heat Cramps Painful Muscle Spasms Electrolyte Imbalance Painful Muscle Spasms Electrolyte Imbalance Drink an Electrolyte Solution Drink an Electrolyte Solution Fainting (Heat Syncope) Not Used to Hot Temperatures Not Used to Hot Temperatures Brief Loss of Consciousness, Sweaty Skin, Normal Body Temperature & No Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Exhaustion Brief Loss of Consciousness, Sweaty Skin, Normal Body Temperature & No Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Exhaustion Lie Down in a Cool Place Lie Down in a Cool Place
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting Heat Illnesses Heat Rash Clogged/Irritated Sweat Glands Clogged/Irritated Sweat Glands Keep Skin Dry & Clean; Wear Loose Cotton Clothing Cool Baths; Lotions to Relieve the Pain/Irritation Keep Skin Dry & Clean; Wear Loose Cotton Clothing Cool Baths; Lotions to Relieve the Pain/Irritation Heat Exhaustion Wet, Pale, & Weak Appearance Wet, Pale, & Weak Appearance Normal Heart Rate/Body Temperature Normal Heart Rate/Body Temperature Severe Cases Vomiting & Fainting Severe Cases Vomiting & Fainting Rest in Cool Place & Drink Electrolyte Solution Rest in Cool Place & Drink Electrolyte Solution
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting
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  • University of California Office of the President August 2009 Safety Meeting In Summary To Prevent Heat Related Illnesses Stay Indoors or In the Shade Stay Indoors or In the Shade If Possible Remain Indoors in the Heat of the DayIf Possible Remain Indoors in the Heat of the Day Drink Plenty of Fluids Drink Plenty of Fluids Rest & Minimize Strenuous Activities Rest & Minimize Strenuous Activities The Young and Elder are the Most Susceptible to Heat-Related Illnesses Require Increased Monitoring During Extreme Heat Conditions Require Increased Monitoring During Extreme Heat Conditions