Ampersand Art Issue

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  • THE ART ISSUE

    Get SchooledStudent Artists Past & Present Word Art

    FeaturingCORE Dance CompanyInternet ArtArt of the Mix

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    DECEMBER 2013 l A PUBL ICAT ION OF THE RED & BLACK

  • 2 AMPERSAND l DEC 2013

    Growing up in a city mostly devoid of culture (except for the lucky ones who had an innate desire to create), coming to Athens was eye opening for me, and opened my mind to the potential for art in unexpected places.

    When you think about it, Athens is kind of like one huge art gallery, home to some of the most talented, inspiring people in the southeast.

    But its not just the Athenian product thats inspiring; the producers themselves are works of art as well. Thats what weve tried to capture in this issue.

    Art can, of course, mean different things to different people, so we asked around town what the word conveys to you (pg. 5). While some may believe that art in the classical sense of the word is obsolete, others would argue differently (pg. 4), and like anything else, that it is changing to adapt to the modern world (pg. 22). Its no surprise that professionals compose a major part of the art scene in the Classic City, but students play an influential role as well (pg. 6), some of whom came here with very different pursuits in mind. Whether college has helped them to articulate the words (pg. 20) or the movements (pg. 24) to express themselves, many students find their artistic strengths in college. And, even if youre not pursuing a degree in the arts, its important to remember the little things you dolike the way you wear your favorite coat (pg. 12) or the way you prepare your signature cocktail (pg. 18)make you an artist.

    What does art mean to you? What inspires the aesthetic in your home, wardrobe, music taste, or dinner plans? Share with us on Twitter @ampersand_uga or facebook.com/ampersand.uga, or tag us in an Instagram @ampersand_uga.

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    Managing EditorLori Keong

    Creative EditorGina Yu

    Senior EditorKate Delvin

    Design EditorHannah Fabian Bailey

    Asst. Design EditorJG Ginsburg

    Photo EditorKristyn Nucci Music Editor

    Will Guerin Fashion Editors

    Meredith Thornhill Marua Kouninska

    Online EditorGrace Donnelly

    Copy Editor Stephen Mays

    EDITORIAL

    Contributing WritersAllie Amato

    Daniel Funke Abi Lambert

    Stephen Mays Sapna Mistry

    Diondra Powers Claire Ruhlin

    Elizabeth Vogan Fashion Team

    Ersta Ferryanto Surina Harjani

    Maria Kouninska Meredith Thornhill

    PhotographersEmily DardamanErsta Ferryanto

    Penn Hansa Alex Laughlin Kristyn Nucci

    Ben Rouse Nick Seymour

    Emily Schoone Design Team

    Hannah Fabian Bailey Abbey Boehmer Michelle Caudill

    JG Ginsburg Sarah Jon

    Abi Lambert Mandy Le

    Maddie Shae Carson Shadwell

    Mary Sommerville Killian Wyatt

    Creative Director

    Dan Roth Creative Assistants

    Christine Byun Victoria Nikolich Bennett Travers

    General ManagerNatalie Mcclure

    Editorial AdvisorEd Morales

    Asst. Editorial AdvisorErin France

    Promotions DirectorAllie Amato

    Office ManagerAshley Oldham

    Distribution ManagerWill Sanchez

    EXECUTIVE EDITOR Stephanie Talmadge

    STAFF

    PRODUCTION

    Editors Note

    Cover Illustration by Mandy Le

  • AMPERSAND l DEC 2013 3

    4 ............ Cartooning Around

    5 ............ Art Actually

    6 ............ Get Schooled

    12 .......... Cover Up

    18 .......... Behind Bars

    20 .......... Talk Pretty

    Contents

    PHOTO BY ANNA PENCE

    Cover Illustration by Mandy Le

    22 .......... Flashing Lights

    24 .......... Universal Lines

  • 4 AMPERSAND l DEC 2013

    CARTOON BY LAWSON CHAMBERS

  • As a North Indian Classical Dancer, there is no better feeling than putting on my ghungroos (bells that are worn around the ankles), getting on stage, and performing the piece that Ive been perfecting for months for the audience. Art holds a different importance in everyones life. We asked people around the Athens community to see what part art plays in their lives.

    Art According

    to AtheniansBY SAPNA M I STRY

    AMPERSAND l DEC 2013 5

    ILLUSTRATION BY CARSON SHADWELL

    Interacting with art is an experience that allows us to create connections with others using a visual language. I especially enjoy helping others engage with works of art to understand the personal impact that art can have on us.

    Carissa DiCindio, Curator of Education, Georgia Museum of Art

    To me, art is a way in which I can freely express myself. There is no right or wrong as to how something should be played, as long as it sounds aesthetic to the ear. As a percussionist, I enjoy interpreting various com-positions by portraying the poetry of them when I play. Art is simply a way in which an artist can speak without necessarily using words.

    Tarika Dhalmia, Tabla Player

    Dance is my outlet. It is the venue through which my soul speaks. It is me, and I am it. It soothes and exhilarates! It challenges and motivates! It is where mind and body come as one. It is where I find my true self. An expression of life through movement. From triumphs to struggles, dance is and forever will be a part of me.

    Bobby Leitmann, UGA Ballroom Dance Club

    To me, art is a language. It is used to communicate to an audiences thoughts, feelings or ideas that words often cannot express. My whole life feels artistic... from my studies to what I am wearing.... its all a visual stimulant for me.

    Erin Nortathomas, Singer (Vocal Percussionist for UGA Noteworthy)

    Art is the universal language. Artists from the past speak to us today, and I speak to people currently through art. However, artwork goes beyond language and culture: Its timeless.

    Stan Mullins, Owner of Stan Mullins Art Studio

    A lot of artists would say art is for yourself. It has to be this back and forth. But I absolutely care what people say about my work, beca use it helps me, and its very encouraging to get good remarks about my cocktails. Its a combination of both. Art is this thing that can pull us away from real life for a minute or inspire us or make us see things in other perspectives. Jimmy Rowalt, Highwire Lounge Bartender

    What does art mean to you? Tell us @ampersand_uga

    It means everything, it is everything. Its maintaining a relationship or being a nice dude. Everything non-essential to survival, what we do in our down time, so it means everything. It gives us a point even if its pointless. Jon Miller, Hand Sand Hands (Band)

  • Draw(n( To ArtTheres much more to the Lamar Dodd School of Art than painting and drawing. Some students that wind up there, though, came to the University of Georgia with different intentions but found themselves drawn to producing art when their other pursuits didnt feel quite right. Lucky for Athenians, those students made the switch, and we reap the benefits of their unconven-tional artistic accomplishments.

    6 AMPERSAND l DEC 2013

    PHOTOS BY NICK SEYMOUR

  • Not Your Ordinary Pillows

    Emily Newdow spent her days working at a cubicle in Atlanta and had no idea how to operate a sewing machine only three years ago. Since then, she has moved to Athens and launched Stitch 9, her own line of quirky, handmade pillows that she sells through her online shop and at local stores Community and Doma.

    Newdow initially ventured into the craft after she thrifted her first sewing machine from the Salvation Army for $25 and buckled down to teach herself the basics.

    I had never done any sewing, she admits. I figured it all out myself definitely learned some better tricks on YouTube.

    With their quirky designs, Stitch 9s pillows offer a refreshing contrast to their mass-produced counterparts. Newdow hand-crafts each piece from upholstery-grade fabric and adorns her creations with designs of high-fiving cats, anatomical hearts, vintage silhouettes and paper airplanes.

    She first began selling her pillows at Community while still living in Atlanta after Sanni Baumgaertner, owner of Community, took notice of Newdows booth at the Indie Craft Fair.

    I was trying to recruit some local artists that make beautiful things that I could sell at the store, and she was one of the people that really stood out to me at the fair, Baumgaertner says. I think the pillows were just really beautiful, and you could just tell that she had a great aesthetic, a great sense for interior design and it turns out later she actually is an interior designer.

    Doma also sells Stitch 9 pillows, and Susanna Drennen, owner of both Doma and its sister shop, Suska, appreciates the distinctive style

    and well-constructed quality of Newdows pillows. I like that shes got a combination of a very modern and a very retro aesthetic, Drennen says. I think the quality of the fabric and her construction technique make them special.

    Newdow earned a Bachelor of Arts in interior design at UGA and worked in commercial interior design for four years in Atlanta. Her creativity continues to inform Stitch 9s design element. I just feel like theres enough people in this world that we share the same design sentiment, Newdow says. So if I really like something, somebody else out there is gonna really like it too.

    Many of her design ideas are also inspired by custom orders. She came up with the high-fiving cats silhouette after a woman called in requesting a custom pillow she could give a sick friend. All I know is that she really likes cats and that she likes the color purple, the customer told Newdow.

    Every Monday through Thursday night after she arrives home from her job as