American Art at the Century; Paintings on the Century Walls;

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  • American Art at the Century by A. Hyatt Mayor; Mark Davis; Paintings on the CenturyWalls by James Thomas FlexnerAmerican Art Journal, Vol. 10, No. 1 (May, 1978), p. 118Published by: Kennedy Galleries, Inc.Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1594126 .Accessed: 25/06/2014 08:13

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  • tragedy. But during the time that he was able to paint them, he presented, as Bodmer could not, their humani- ty; not only did he record their faces with telling accuracy, but he also made very astute comments about his sitters. We realize the anthropological significance of his work, also, as Catlin himself did; he took his "Indian Gallery" on tour to Europe along with literally tons of artifacts and was the toast of England and France. The bulk of his production was subsequently deposited in the National Collection and over half of his works are reproduced in this volume. Hassrick's comments in the captions, while brief, are intriguing and produce tidbits of information about the sitters, the etymology of their names, and the artist's impressions of his subjects. Clearly, Catlin was impressed by the Indians and, if modern scholars feel he embellished the truth a bit here and there or if his ethnographic details were not as accurate as Bodmer's, he can be forgiven. His accomplishments are extraordinary for what they are, not for what they are not.

    Hood, Graham. Charles Bridges and William Dering: Two Virginia Painters, 1735-1750. Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1978. Published for The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. xvi + 125 pp. 85 illus. incl. 9 in color. Index. $15.00.

    Charles Bridges's career, according to Graham Hood, parallels that of the far better-known John Smibert. Yet, Bridges has suffered from a considerable lack of attention and study. This is the first publication on the artist in twenty-five years and was prepared in conjunction with an exhibition of Bridges and Dering at Williamsburg. Hood has attributed a relatively large number of portraits to Bridges despite a handicap of traditional family identifications for the sitters which he found to be largely apocryphal. Although the sitters' identities are in ques- tion, the attributions to Bridges, Hood feels, although some might differ with him occasionally, are supportable. The material in the book on William Dering, a dancing master as well as a some-time painter, is much smaller because so much less is known about his short career. A surprisingly large percentage of the Bridges and Dering portraits still remain with the original families for which they were painted and, in some instances, have never been out of their ancestral homes.

    Hoopes, Donelson F. American Watercolor Painting. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1977. 208 pp. 165 illus. incl. 48 in color. Bibliography. Index. $27.50.

    Some of our greatly-loved favorites as well as some very seldomly-seen but equally lovely examples from notable private collections and university museums are presented in this assemblage of American watercolors. Indeed, Hoopes is to be congratulated for taking the trouble to go after the paintings in university collections which, for a host of reasons, are practically unknown, despite their superb quality, beyond a tiny radius. Beginning with Thomas Birch and ending with contem- poraries of Mark Rothko, Hoopes covers the develop-

    tragedy. But during the time that he was able to paint them, he presented, as Bodmer could not, their humani- ty; not only did he record their faces with telling accuracy, but he also made very astute comments about his sitters. We realize the anthropological significance of his work, also, as Catlin himself did; he took his "Indian Gallery" on tour to Europe along with literally tons of artifacts and was the toast of England and France. The bulk of his production was subsequently deposited in the National Collection and over half of his works are reproduced in this volume. Hassrick's comments in the captions, while brief, are intriguing and produce tidbits of information about the sitters, the etymology of their names, and the artist's impressions of his subjects. Clearly, Catlin was impressed by the Indians and, if modern scholars feel he embellished the truth a bit here and there or if his ethnographic details were not as accurate as Bodmer's, he can be forgiven. His accomplishments are extraordinary for what they are, not for what they are not.

    Hood, Graham. Charles Bridges and William Dering: Two Virginia Painters, 1735-1750. Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1978. Published for The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. xvi + 125 pp. 85 illus. incl. 9 in color. Index. $15.00.

    Charles Bridges's career, according to Graham Hood, parallels that of the far better-known John Smibert. Yet, Bridges has suffered from a considerable lack of attention and study. This is the first publication on the artist in twenty-five years and was prepared in conjunction with an exhibition of Bridges and Dering at Williamsburg. Hood has attributed a relatively large number of portraits to Bridges despite a handicap of traditional family identifications for the sitters which he found to be largely apocryphal. Although the sitters' identities are in ques- tion, the attributions to Bridges, Hood feels, although some might differ with him occasionally, are supportable. The material in the book on William Dering, a dancing master as well as a some-time painter, is much smaller because so much less is known about his short career. A surprisingly large percentage of the Bridges and Dering portraits still remain with the original families for which they were painted and, in some instances, have never been out of their ancestral homes.

    Hoopes, Donelson F. American Watercolor Painting. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1977. 208 pp. 165 illus. incl. 48 in color. Bibliography. Index. $27.50.

    Some of our greatly-loved favorites as well as some very seldomly-seen but equally lovely examples from notable private collections and university museums are presented in this assemblage of American watercolors. Indeed, Hoopes is to be congratulated for taking the trouble to go after the paintings in university collections which, for a host of reasons, are practically unknown, despite their superb quality, beyond a tiny radius. Beginning with Thomas Birch and ending with contem- poraries of Mark Rothko, Hoopes covers the develop-

    tragedy. But during the time that he was able to paint them, he presented, as Bodmer could not, their humani- ty; not only did he record their faces with telling accuracy, but he also made very astute comments about his sitters. We realize the anthropological significance of his work, also, as Catlin himself did; he took his "Indian Gallery" on tour to Europe along with literally tons of artifacts and was the toast of England and France. The bulk of his production was subsequently deposited in the National Collection and over half of his works are reproduced in this volume. Hassrick's comments in the captions, while brief, are intriguing and produce tidbits of information about the sitters, the etymology of their names, and the artist's impressions of his subjects. Clearly, Catlin was impressed by the Indians and, if modern scholars feel he embellished the truth a bit here and there or if his ethnographic details were not as accurate as Bodmer's, he can be forgiven. His accomplishments are extraordinary for what they are, not for what they are not.

    Hood, Graham. Charles Bridges and William Dering: Two Virginia Painters, 1735-1750. Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1978. Published for The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. xvi + 125 pp. 85 illus. incl. 9 in color. Index. $15.00.

    Charles Bridges's career, according to Graham Hood, parallels that of the far better-known John Smibert. Yet, Bridges has suffered from a considerable lack of attention and study. This is the first publication on the artist in twenty-five years and was prepared in conjunction with an exhibition of Bridges and Dering at Williamsburg. Hood has attributed a relatively large number of portraits to Bridges despite a handicap of traditional family identifications for the sitters which he found to be largely apocryphal. Although the sitters' identities are in ques- tion, the attributions to Bridges, Hood feels, although some might differ with him occasionally, are supportable. The material in the book on William Dering, a dancing master as well as a some-time painter, is much smaller because so much less is known about his short career. A surprisingly large percentage of the Bridges and Dering portraits still remain with the original families for which they were painted and, in some instances, have never been out of their ancestral homes.

    Hoopes, Donelson F. American Watercolor Painting. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications