460.03a subjectivity objectively

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  • SUBJECTIVITY: OBJECTIVELY SPEAKINGModern Concepts in Taste and Aesthetics

  • MODERNITYUs or Them?

  • !1. Foundations

    2. The objective nature

    of the subject

    3. Objectivity/

    Subjectivity

    4. Natural Philosophy to

    Science

    5. Static to Dynamic

    Empiricism

    RationalismDescartes

    1596-1650

    Hume

    1711-1776

    Berkeley

    1685-1753

    Leibniz

    1646-1716

    Galileo

    1564-1642

    Newton

    1642-1727

    Linneaus

    1707-1778

    Lavoisier

    1743-1794

    Darwin

    1809-1882

  • !1. Foundations

    2. The objective nature

    of the subject

    3. Objectivity/

    Subjectivity

    Empiricism

    RationalismDescartes

    1596-1650

    Hume

    1711-1776

  • HUMETaste and the Critic

  • HUME

    All knowledge comes from experience

    images from http://www.cerebromente.org.br/n16/mente/senses1.html

  • images from http://www.create-a-healthy-flexible-body.com/images/pain-relief-using-the-mind.jpg

    HUME

    All knowledge comes from experience

  • Gold

    HUME

    All knowledge comes from experience

  • Mountain

    HUME

    All knowledge comes from experience

  • +HUME

    All knowledge comes from experience Gold Mountain

  • On a long journey of human life, faith is the best of companions; it is the best refreshment on the journey; and it is the greatest property.

    Gautama Siddharta, the founder of Buddhism, 563-483 B.C.

    Practice loving kindness: do not do utno others as you would not have them do to you

    Confucius, The Confucian Analects

    I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: therefore

    choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live

    Moses, Deuteronomy 30:19

    But with love, we are creative. With it, we march tirelessly. With it, and with it alone, we are able

    to sacrifice for others.

    Chief Dan George

    'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.'

    Jesus, Mark 12:28-31

  • Is beauty merely in the eye of the beholder?

  • Milton: Paradise Lost

    Ogilby

    Mount Teneriffe

  • Homers Popularity Over Time

    0

    25

    50

    75

    100

    700 BCE 350 BCE 0 350 ACE 700 ACE 1050 ACE 1750 ACE 2000 ACE

    Athens

    The Standard of Taste and

    The Test of Time

    Paris

    London

    Rome

    Bachs Popularity Over Time

    0

    25

    50

    75

    100

    700 BCE 350 BCE 0 350 ACE 700 ACE 1050 ACE 1750 ACE 2000 ACE

  • The Critic

  • The Character of the Critic

    1.Strong Sense

    2.Delicate Sentiment

    3.Practice

    4.Comparison

    5.Free from Prejudice

  • Rachmaninov:

    Symphony No. 2 in E Minor,

    Op. 27: III. Adagio

    Baltimore Symphony Orchestra & David

    Zinman

  • Rachmaninov:

    Symphony No. 2 in E Minor,

    Op. 27: III. Adagio

    Mikhail Pletnev &

    Russian National Orchestra

  • Like a Virgin

    Madonna

  • Like a Virgin

    Marylin Manson

  • KANTThe Aesthetic and the Free Play of the Imagination

  • logi

    c

    aesthetic

  • Phenoumenallogic

    aesthetic

  • Phenoumenallogic

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

  • Phenoumenallogic

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    The analytic + the aesthetic constitutes an object. Both are needed, neither by itself is enough.

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Part of the concept of an object is that it is a thing in itself a Ding

    an Sich that exists outside the

    phenoumenal, in the noumenal

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Noumenal

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    Noumenal

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Noumenal

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    In this technical sense judgements about

    beauty are intuitive, aesthetic, and non-

    conceptual

    Noumenal

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Noumenal

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuitionJudgements about facts, by contrast, are

    conceptual

    Noumenal

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    Such judgements are objective in that they have four conceptual

    vectors: quality, quantity, relation, and modality

    Noumenal

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Noumenal

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    Judgements about beauty have analogous vectors but without

    conceptual or objective grounding

    Noumenal

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    Noumenal

    Definition of the Beautiful derived from the First Moment: Taste is the faculty of

    estimating an object or a mode of representation by means of a delight or

    aversion apart from any interest. The object of such a delight is called beautiful.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    The judgement of taste is aesthetic.

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    concept

    intuition

    Noumenal

    In order to distinguish whether anything is beautiful or not, we refer the representation, not by the understanding to the object for

    cognition, but by the imagination (perhaps in conjunction with the understanding) to the subject and its feeling of pleasure or pain.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    The judgement of taste is aesthetic.

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    existence

    intuition

    NoumenalWe wish only to know if this mere representation of the object is accompanied in me with satisfaction, however indifferent I may be as regards the existence of the object of this representation. We easily see that, in

    saying it is beautiful and in showing that I have taste, I am concerned, not with that in which I

    depend on the existence of the object, but with that which I make out of this

    representation in myself.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    The judgement of taste is aesthetic.

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    representation

    as sensation/

    existence

    feeling/

    desire

    NoumenalIf a determination of the feeling of pleasure or pain is called sensation, this expression

    signifies something quite different from what I mean when I call the representation of a thing

    sensation. For in the latter case the representation is referred to the object, in the

    former simply to the subject.

    The green color of the meadows belongs to objective sensation; the pleasantness of this

    belongs to subjective sensation.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    The judgement of taste is aesthetic.

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    utility

    feeling/

    desire

    Noumenal

    That which pleases only as a means we call good for something (the useful), but that which pleases for itself is good in itself. In

    both there is always involved the concept of a purpose, and consequently the relation of

    reason to the (at least possible) volition, and thus a satisfaction in the presence of an

    object or an action, i.e. some kind of interest.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    The judgement of taste is aesthetic.

  • you

    object

    is pleasing to

    you

    object

    is good for

    purpose

    youobject

    purpose

    Pleasant

    Good

    Beautiful

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    Noumenal

    Taste is the faculty of estimating an object or a mode of representation by means of a

    delight or aversion apart from any interest.

    FIRST MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quality.

    the beautiful is disinterested

    beautiful

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    Noumenal

    Definition of the Beautiful drawn from the Second Moment:

    The beautiful is that which, apart from a concept, pleases universally.

    SECOND MOMENT. Of the Judgement of Taste: Moment of Quantity.

    The beautiful is that which, apart from concepts, is represented as the Object

    of a universal delight.

    beautiful

  • Phenoumenal

    logi

    c

    aesthetic

    concept

    intuition

    object

    Ding an Sich

    NoumenalFor since it does not rest on any inclination of

    the subject (nor upon any other premeditated interest), but since the person who judges

    feels himself quite free as regards the satisfact