2012 IBEX Training ibex full on board...¢  2012-10-25¢  2012 IBEX Training [NMEA] Session 913 ¢â‚¬â€‌ Best

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  • 2012 IBEX Training

    [NMEA] Session 913 — Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Instructors: David Gratton, Martek of Palm Beach

    Todd Crocker, Fusion Electronics

    Please turn off cell phones. Thank You More Information - www.nmea.org - 410-975-9425

    © 2012 Martek of Palm Beach, All Rights Reserved

    http://www.nmea.org/

  • Onboard Entertainment Systems Overview

    Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Onboard Entertainment Overview

    Clients have a wealth of entertainment at their fingertips in their workplaces and their homes and, in most cases, they expect the same conveniences onboard their yacht. Many manufacturers offer readily available products to provide that entertainment so what could be simpler?

    Nothing more daunting than a mobile platform that produces it’s own power spends the majority of it’s life in the most hostile environment on the planet!

    Electronics & water do not play well together.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Onboard Entertainment Overview Important Elements of a Successful Installation

    • System Design

    • Product Selection

    • Installation Planning

    • Installation Execution

    #1 = Setting REALISTIC Client Expectations!!!

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    System Design What features does the client wish to have?

    • Simple local area audio only (AM/FM/CD)

    Now not so simple…

    • iPod connectivity?

    • Satellite radio audio?

    • NMEA2000 integration?

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    System Design

    What features does the client wish to have?

    • Simple distributed audio and video?

    • How many zones? What quality of signal?

    Now not so simple (AGAIN)… • Streaming video from a shared source? • WiFi connectivity? • iPad connectivity & control?

    You can only install a system properly if you understand what the client wants and how to give it to

    them!

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    What equipment provides the features the client expects for the budget he has agreed to?

    What vessel power is available? (12VDC?, 110VAC?, 220VAC?)

    Which approach will you take to achieve the design? Stereo Heads Ends? Component Based Systems?

    Will you incorporate peripherals? Satellite Entertainment? Control Systems?

    What Display Technology will you use? Plasma? LCD/LED? DVI? HDMI?

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    What are the strengths and weaknesses of the products that you are considering selling?

    How many inputs and outputs will the product accommodate? Scalability is an important consideration to clients

    What is YOUR experience with product longevity? NO CONSUMER ELECTRONICS ARE DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE THE POWER, TEMPERATURE, AND VIBRATION PROFILES ONBOARD A YACHT!!!

    What is the return policy of the distributor? (Most consumer electronics companies offer 30days DOA replacement only, after that send the defective for repair!)

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Analog)

    • Composite Video (Analog, limited to 480i, High Definition not possible)

    The lowest quality of video signal, but also one of the most common, found in everything from video games to VHS machines and DVD players. Composite is limited to 480i (standard definition) resolution. Once you’ve seen a higher end high definition signal (720p, 1080i, 1080p), chances are you’ll abandon all sources using composite video

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Analog)

    • S-Video Video (Analog, limited to 480i, High Definition not possible)

    One step above a composite video signal but still limited to 480i (standard definition) signals. S-Video signal is about 25% better in picture detail than a composite video signal, so wherever possible, use an S-Video feed to send to the projector over a composite video signal. Due to the black and white and chroma (color) signal being run separately within an S-video cable, the general recommended length of an S-video cable is limited to 30 feet or less.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Analog)

    • Component/YPbPr Video (Analog, 480i to 1080p resolutions supported)

    High definition signals usually come in 1080i or 720p outputs from a high definition cable/satellite box and 1080i, 720p, or 1080p from HD-DVD/Blu-Ray players. Note: A component signal is NOT the same as an RGB signal even through the color coding is the same. The signals in component cables are broken up differently than those carried in an RGBHV cable so you cannot switch between the two using simple cables.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Analog)

    • RGBHV Video (Analog, 480i to 1080p resolutions supported)

    RGBHV signals also come in varying resolutions and can support from a basic 480i video signal all the way up to 1080p and beyond. Some devices use each color and one for both the H and V sync signals. This is referred to as 'RGBs' or RGB with composite sync.

    An older format will sometimes only use 3 cables by running the sync signals along with the green video signal. This is referred to as RGsB or RGB with sync on green.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Digital)

    • DVI Video (Digital, 480i to 1080p and beyond resolutions supported)

    DVI and HDMI are the highest quality signals available. The video signals of a DVI and an HDMI cable are very similar. The HDMI cable is a later version that also adds digital audio (a DVI connector only carries digital video). Adapters to convert the video signal between DVI and HDMI connectors can be found at any good audio video store or online for very cheap.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Digital) • DVI Video (cont’d) DVI-A: Analog only. Content is found on the four pin group that's separate from the main pin group. DVI-D: Digital only. The four pin group is usually not even present. If it is present, there is no content being carried on it. DVI-I: Both analog and digital. Both groups are active.

    DVI you can think of as basically digital RGB, it sends digital

    8-bit RGB format signals and supports high resolutions.

  • Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

    Product Selection

    Common Video Format Primer (Digital) • HDMI Video

    HDMI is the newer, more capable version of DVI which adds audio capabilities, and also makes high definition copy protection (HDCP) mandatory whereas in DVI it was optional. HDMI is backwards compatible, so you can use HDMI-to-DVI adapters or cables and the devices will just revert to basic DVI capabilities which is 8-bit RGB without audio.

    If you use HDMI to HDMI, then you're not limited to standard DVI capabilities, and also have digital audio capabilities such as: Dolby Digital, DTS, high-resolution PCM, etc. The newest version of HDMI (HDMI 1.3 and higher) allows un-decoded high res and high res lossless versions of Dolby Digital (True HD) and DTS (DTS-HD Master Audio) for HD-DVD and Blu-ray disc.

  • A Problematic Term

    Scope Creep – Refers to uncontrolled changes or continuous growth in a project's scope. This phenomenon can occur when the scope of a project is not properly defined, documented, or controlled. Typically, the scope increase consists of either new products or new features of already approved product designs, without corresponding increases in resources, schedule, or budget. As the scope of a project grows, more tasks must be completed within the budget and schedule originally designed for a smaller set of tasks. If you do not set client expectations properly or if you are unfamiliar with the products you are integrating into your system, you will DEFINITELY learn what Scope Creep is!

    Terminology

    Best Installation Techniques for Onboard Entertainment Systems

  • Some Common Causes of Scope Creep

    A disingenuous customer with a determined "value for free" policy;

    Poor change control;

    Lack of proper initial identification of what is required to bring about the project objectives;

    A weak project manager or executive sponsor;

    Poor communication between parties;