1 Working Definition of “High School Literacyâ€‌ Working Definition of “High School Literacyâ€‌ “High School Literacy includes all the elements of literacy—

  • View
    214

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of 1 Working Definition of “High School Literacyâ€‌ Working...

  • Slide 1
  • 1 Working Definition of High School Literacy Working Definition of High School Literacy High School Literacy includes all the elements of literacy reading, writing, listening, speaking, critical thinking, use of technology, and habits of mind that foster postsecondary successthat are expected of entering freshmen across all college disciplines as well as those entering the workforce. These competencies should be learned in the content areas and should be valued and reinforced in all related instructional areas throughout students' high school experiences.
  • Slide 2
  • High School Literacy Don Deshler
  • Slide 3
  • LANGUAGE SKILLS STRATEGIES SUBJECT MATTER Building Blocks for Content Literacy HIGHER ORDER
  • Slide 4
  • SUBJECT MATTER STRATEGIES SKILLS LANGUAGE A Continuum of Literacy Instruction (RTI -- Tiered Instruction ) HIGHER ORDER Level 1:Enhance content instruction (mastery of critical content for all regardless of literacy levels) Level 2:Embedded strategy instruction (routinely weave strategies within and across classes using large group instructional methods) Level 3:Intensive strategy instruction (mastery of specific strategies using intensive-explicit instructional sequences) Level 4:Intensive basic skill instruction (mastery of entry level literacy skills at the 4th grade level) Level 5:Therapeutic intervention (mastery of language underpinnings of curriculum content and learning strategies)
  • Slide 5
  • Content Literacy Synergy Improved Literacy CONTENT CLASSES Level 1. Enhanced Content Instruction CONTENT CLASSES Level 2. Embedded Strategy Instruction Level 3. Intensive Strategy Instruction strategy classes strategic tutoring Level 4. Intensive Basic Skill Instruction KU-CRLCLC- Lenz, Ehren, &Deshler, 2005 Level 5. Therapeutic Intervention Foundational language competencies
  • Slide 6
  • Proficient readers are good at or have Background knowledge Text/knowledge structure Vocabulary Learning strategies Fluency Sight word vocabularies Word recognition Level 1 Level 3, 4, 5 Level 1, 2, 3
  • Slide 7
  • The Performance Gap 121110987654312111098765431 Years in School Grade Level Expectations Demands Skills
  • Slide 8
  • The Performance Gap Years in School Infrastructure Supports Existing Support Infrastructure Supports Flexible Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning and Planning Behavioral Supports Smaller Learning Communities Grade Level Expectations Demands Skills
  • Slide 9
  • The Performance Gap / Grade Level Expectations Demands Skills System Learning Supports Infrastructure Supports Current Supports Progress Monitoring Collaborative Problem-Solving Instructional Coaching Professional Learning System Learning Supports Years in School
  • Slide 10
  • The Performance Gap / Grade Level Expectations Demands Skills Instructional Core System Learning Supports Infrastructure Supports Current Supports Years in School Instructional Core Standards-Informed Curriculum Planning Connected Courses & Coherent Learning Continuum of Literacy Instruction Motivation Strategies Engaging Instructional Materials & Activities Student-Informed Teaching
  • Slide 11
  • System change must be closely tied to the individual within the system Shared Visionthat allows individual contributions Knowledgethat leads to individual learning Leadershipthat seeks the voice of individuals Responsibilitythat shapes individual planning and action Evaluationthat guides self assessment Accountabilitythat motivates individual action
  • Slide 12
  • Critical Values for System Change Shared + + Instructional Core Standards-Informed Curriculum Planning Connected Courses & Coherent Learning Continuum of Literacy Instruction Motivation Strategies Engaging Instructional Materials & Activities Student-Informed Teaching System Learning Supports Progress Monitoring Collaborative Problem Solving Instructional Coaching Professional Learning Improved Outcomes = = College Readiness and Postseconda ry Success Infrastructure Supports Flexible Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning and Planning Extended Learning Time Behavioral Supports Smaller Learning Communities + Vision Knowledge Leadership Accountability Evaluation Responsibility that respects the individual in the system +
  • Slide 13
  • Lessons learned by KU-CRL about improving secondary school outcomes 1.Initiatives should be driven by high expectations that prepare students for college and post-secondary success 2.The literacy needs of adolescents vary greatly -- these differences must be accounted for in a continuum of instruction that meets the needs of all students 3.Change initiatives should be undertaken in light of individual school resources, values, and skill sets
  • Slide 14
  • Lessons learned by KU-CRL about improving secondary school outcomes (continued) 4. The secondary school culture must explicitly reinforce literacy with sufficient authentic and explicit practice embedded across all subject areas 5. There is a interactive synergistic relationship based on principles of learning that cuts across a continuum of literacy instruction (i.e., CLC) 6. Critical instructional and infrastructural elements must be leveraged at the school and district level
  • Slide 15
  • Contact Don Deshler 785.864.4780 ddeshler@ku.edu
  • Slide 16
  • Enhancing Literacy for High School Improvement James Kemple MDRC Prepared for National High School Center Summer Institute June 2007
  • Slide 17
  • Overview of Key Issues: Nature of the Problem Struggling adolescent readers face general problem with reading for understanding. Specific challenges span weak basic skills (phonics, vocabulary, fluency, etc) through limited repertoire of strategies aimed at reading for understanding (meta-cognition, drawing inferences, drawing meaning from context, content-specific vocabulary, etc) Literacy not typically seen as the domain of high schools, particularly content-area teachers.
  • Slide 18
  • Overview of Key Issues: Strategies for Intervention Equipping high schools and high school teachers with literacy-focused instructional strategies will require: Making literacy a priority that complements, rather than competes with content requirements. Building capacity for teachers to differentiate instruction without lowering expectations. Three pronged strategy: Teaching strategies that account for limited literacy General teaching strategies that address literacy needs Intensive support for struggling readers
  • Slide 19
  • Overview of Key Issues: Building Knowledge Limited evidence about what works points to the need for knowledge building by evaluating new initiatives before going to scale.
  • Slide 20
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Literacy for Adolescent English Learners: Building Capacity for Quality Programs Ada Walqui Director, Teacher Professional Development Program WestEd awalqui@wested.org www.wested.org/qtel National High School Center Summer Institute Washington, S.C. Tuesday, June 12, 2007
  • Slide 21
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Issues that need to be addressed Language mediates all learning. For English Language Learners the development of literacy skills entails both building the tool and the product of learning at the same time. To teach something, teachers need to know it explicitly. Most teachers in high school are disciplinary experts, but their knowledge of the language needed to demonstrate their expertise is implicit. Disciplinary language awareness is a must for teachers.
  • Slide 22
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Teachers going through QTEL professional development learn by participating in activity
  • Slide 23
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 This enables them to understand the disciplinary language and the pedagogy necessary to develop rich literacies in English as a second language
  • Slide 24
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 We seldom see quality instruction with English Language Learners Quality is characterized by QTELs principles: Sustain Academic Rigor in teaching English Learners Hold High Expectations in teaching English Learners Engage in Quality Interactions with English Learners Sustain a Language Focus in teaching English Learners Develop Quality Curricula in teaching English Learners
  • Slide 25
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Teaching Learning Zones (adapted from Mariani, 1997; Hammond and Gibbons, 2007) high challenge low challenge high supportlow support APPRENTICESHIP ZONE (ZPD) FRUSTRATION ZONE POBRECITO ZONE NOWHERE ZONE
  • Slide 26
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Building Capacity At the school level: Nested, coherent professional development that encompasses : ESL, subject matter teachers; teacher supporters (professional developers, coaches, instructional support specialists, curriculum directors); educational leaders. East Side Union High School District, 5 schools
  • Slide 27
  • WestEd, Teacher Professional Development, 2007 Work with Educational Leadership Figure 1: Ripples of impact on Teacher professional Development, Year 1 All teachers (6 days) Informal teacher Leadership (2 more days) Formal teacher Leadership (4 more days)