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1 Presentation content developed by: Slide 2 2 Pleasant Positive Unpleasant Negative High Emotion Energy Low How are you? Mood Meter Energy ___ Mood ___ Slide 3 3 Mood Meter Results Emotion Energy Slide 4 4 PleasantUnpleasant High Emotion Energy Low Sad Happy Angry Calm Content Pleased Afraid Annoyed Bored Tired Surprised Does it matter how you feel? Slide 5 5 Success factors: Must have Intelligence Intelligence Motivation Motivation Technical Knowledge Technical Knowledge Slide 6 6 Success factors: Helps to have Specific skills Specific skills Certain experiences Certain experiences Emotional Intelligence Emotional Intelligence Slide 7 7 You might have heard of EI / EQ Slide 8 8 The science of EI Began in 1990 by Salovey & Mayer Began in 1990 by Salovey & Mayer Mayer, Salovey, Carusos approach sets the gold standard. - Dr. Catherine Daus & Dr. Neal Ashkanasy Emotional intelligence is "the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one's thinking and action". Slide 9 9 Emotional intelligence theory IDENTIFY USE UNDERSTAND MANAGE Slide 10 10 Emotional Intelligence is: A hard skill A hard skill A form of intelligence A form of intelligenceWhere You think about emotions, and You think about emotions, and Emotions help you think Emotions help you think Slide 11 11 Emotional Intelligence relates to: Greater empathy for others Greater empathy for others More positive behaviors More positive behaviors Less negative behaviors Less negative behaviors Better quality social relationships Better quality social relationships Enhanced communication Enhanced communication Social support Social support Vision, charisma, teamwork Vision, charisma, teamwork Slide 12 12 Emotions have meaning and importance 1. Occurs due to a change in the environment 2. Occurs automatically and quickly 3. Changes attention and thought 4. Certain physical feelings 5. Motivates behavior Serves an adaptive function Slide 13 13 Emotions drive relationships The primary function of emotion is to mobilize the organism to deal quickly with important interpersonal events. The primary function of emotion is to mobilize the organism to deal quickly with important interpersonal events. Events include: threats, attacks, alarms, courtships, social contact, isolation, greetings, appeasement, dominance, submission, and play. Events include: threats, attacks, alarms, courtships, social contact, isolation, greetings, appeasement, dominance, submission, and play. Robert Plutchik, psychologist Robert Plutchik, psychologist Slide 14 14 Emotions are universal Darwin The expression of the emotions in man and animals (1872) Darwin The expression of the emotions in man and animals (1872) Slide 15 15 Emotions have universal meaning Happiness Gain something of value Sadness Lose something of value Surprise Something is happening Anger Blocked from getting something Fear Possible threat Disgust Rules are violated Slide 16 16 EnglishDeutschFranaisItalianoEspagnol AfraidVerngstigtApeurImpauritoAtemorizado Angryrgerlichen colreArrabbiatoEnfadado HappyGlcklichHeureuxFeliceFeliz SadTraurigTriste SurprisedberraschtSurprisSorpresoSorprendido DisgustedEkelerflltDgotDisgustatoAsqueado CalmRuhigCalmeCalmoCalmado BoredGelangweiltEnnuyAnnoiatoAburrido InterestedInteressiertIntressInteressatoInteresado ExcitedErregtExcitEccitatoExcitado A common emotional language Slide 17 17 But, there are individual and group differences Emotional sensitivity: - Ability to pick up emotional signals - Varies from person to person Specific causes of emotions: - Can vary from person to person and across groups Slide 18 18 Specific causes may differ Disgust Disgust Slide 19 19 Emotional Differences When we express these emotions: - Differs from culture to culture - These are called display rules Slide 20 20 Emotional display rules Emotions expressed at work Emotions expressed at work Anger Happiness 53% 19% Slide 21 21 Do you know if you are emotionally intelligent? Slide 22 22 People are poor judges of their own intelligence and very poor judges of their emotional intelligence Self-rated IQ versus IQ tests Self-rated IQ versus IQ tests Self-rated EI versus EI Ability test Self-rated EI versus EI Ability test Self-Report EI x MSCEIT Scores Slide 23 23 Measuring EI: MSCEIT Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test MSCEIT is an IQ test for emotions MSCEIT is an IQ test for emotions Slide 24 24 Objective EI Tests Have right and wrong answers Have right and wrong answers Objectively scored Objectively scored Based on fact that emotions are data Based on fact that emotions are data Slide 25 25 Identify Emotions AngerSadnessHappinessDisgustFearSurprise None Perhaps Present Slide 26 26 Your score: AngerSadnessHappinessDisgustFearSurprise None Perhaps Present Slide 27 27 Use Emotions Anger Sadness Happiness Which emotion would be most useful to have someone agree to help you with a difficult and time-consuming project? Slide 28 28 Your score: Which emotion would be most useful to have someone agree to help you with a difficult and time-consuming project? Anger Sadness Happiness Slide 29 29 Understand Emotions 1. A client feels frustrated. 2. Repeatedly asks you for information. 3. He is getting annoyed. 4. You ignore the request. 5. The client will feel: Disgust Anger Sadness Slide 30 30 Your score: 1. A client feels frustrated. 2. Repeatedly asks you for information. 3. He is getting annoyed. 4. You ignore the request. 5. The client will feel: Disgust Anger Sadness Slide 31 31 Manage Emotions The client keeps asking for more and more information about the same product. How effective would each of these actions be in addressing client concerns? Address each of the issues in order of their importance. Find out what is making the client anxious. Demonstrate that the concerns are unfounded. Not At All A LittleA Lot Slide 32 32 Your score: Address each of the issues in order of their importance. Find out what is making the client anxious. Demonstrate that the concerns are unfounded. A LittleA Lot Not At All The client keeps asking for more and more information about the same product. How effective would each of these actions be in addressing client concerns? Slide 33 33 Applying Your EI High EI: apply your abilities High EI: apply your abilities Low EI: Low EI:DevelopCompensate Slide 34 34 Slide 35 35 Identify Emotions Identify emotions in self and others Identify emotions in self and others Express emotions accurately Express emotions accurately Slide 36 36 Identify Emotions We often don't share feelings information. We often don't share feelings information. We may cover up how we feel in order to protect others. We may cover up how we feel in order to protect others. We say that everything is fine when it is not. We say that everything is fine when it is not. We claim that we're not worried, when we are. We claim that we're not worried, when we are. However, such deception is easy to spot. However, such deception is easy to spot. We don't protect our clients or family in this way, but instead, we create an atmosphere of mistrust. We don't protect our clients or family in this way, but instead, we create an atmosphere of mistrust. Slide 37 37 Relevance Enhances communication Enhances communication Enhances quality of relationships Enhances quality of relationships Source of info about your client Source of info about your client Sends information to client Sends information to client Slide 38 38 Identify Emotions Questions Pay attention to emotion cues? Pay attention to emotion cues? Pick up on emotional signals? Pick up on emotional signals? Read people accurately? Read people accurately? Accurately express my emotions? Accurately express my emotions? Slide 39 39 Identify Emotions Exercise Slide 40 40 Slide 41 41 Use Emotions Use emotions to help you think in different ways Use emotions to help you think in different ways Match the right emotion to the task Match the right emotion to the task Slide 42 42 Use Emotions What Negative Moods Do For Thinking Provide us with a clear focus Provide us with a clear focus Details examined more efficiently Details examined more efficiently Search for errors is enhanced Search for errors is enhanced What Positive Moods Do For Thinking Expands our thinking Expands our thinking Helps generate new ideas Helps generate new ideas Encourages us to consider possibilities Encourages us to consider possibilities Slide 43 43 Use Emotions: Specific influence of emotions EmotionImpact AngerFight DisgustReject FearAvoid SadnessGive up SurprisePay attention HappinessExplore Slide 44 44 Relevance Emotional connection Emotional connection Communicate, motivate and inspire Communicate, motivate and inspire Empathy Empathy Slide 45 45 Use Emotions Questions Consider how clients moods impact his decision making? Consider how clients moods impact his decision making? Is this the right time for this discussion? Is this the right time for this discussion? Match the mood to the situation? Match the mood to the situation? Slide 46 46 Use Emotions Exercise Slide 47 47 Slide 48 48 Understand Emotions Understand the causes of emotions Understand complex emotions Slide 49 49 Relevance Insight into others Insight into others What bothers them? What bothers them? What worries them? What worries them? What makes them happy? What makes them happy? Slide 50 50 Understand Emotions Questions Do I truly understand the client? Do I truly understand the client? Understand myself? Understand myself? Do I engage in emotional what-if planning before important meetings? Do I engage in emotional what-if planning before important meetings? Slide 51 51 Understand Emotions Exercise EmotionCauseYouOther AngerObstacle DisgustDistasteful FearThreat Happiness Gain something Sadness Lose so