1 Eating Wisely/Aging Well Food as Medicine Oregon State University Extension Service Sharon Johnson M.S

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  • 1 Eating Wisely/Aging Well Food as Medicine Oregon State University Extension Service Sharon Johnson M.S.
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  • 2 Food as Medicine? As we age, we need Less food More nutrient- dense food Colorful food
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  • 3 Less Food? Consider using a 9 plate 1/2 the plate should be vegetables 1/4 quarter should be whole grains 1/4 quarter should be protein Source: Idaho Plate Method
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  • 4 Nutrient-dense food? Every day: 2 cups of fruit Every day: 2 1/2 cups of vegetables Every day: 3 cups of low fat milk (or an equivalent) 2005 New Dietary Guidelines
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  • 5 More colorful food? Your plate should look like a pile of color crayons Colorful foods (red, yellow/orange, blue/purple, green, white) actually prevent disease conditions Source; www.5aday.comwww.5aday.com
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  • 6 The advantages of color in your diet it treats disease Vitamins and minerals Antioxidants (to neutralize free radicals) Fiber Lessened likelihood of overweight/obesity Source: USDA
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  • 7 Color your food and prevent disease? APPLES: 80 calories of easy eating Well-packaged fast food High in calcium, fiber and potassium
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  • 8 Color your food and prevent disease SPINACH: Contains Vitamin C Important for vision protection Good source of folate (folic acid) Fewer calories
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  • 9 Color your food and prevent disease BLUEBERRIES: More disease-fighting antioxidants than any other fruit Lowers risk of some cancers Improves urinary tract health Reverses mental decline
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  • 10 As we age, we need to. Select carbohydrates wisely Focus on whole grains Reduce use of processed foods
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  • 11 Select carbohydrates wisely Fruits Vegetables Whole grains
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  • 12 Really focus on whole grains Eat three or more ounce-equivalents of whole grain products each day Make half your grains whole Source: www.mypyramid.govwww.mypyramid.gov
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  • 13 Reduce use of processed foods Read nutrition labels
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  • 14 Hydrate (drink enough water) Make it a habit: Take medications with water Eat your water Remember: older adults may not recognize the thirst sensation
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  • 15 As we age, we need to Select protein carefully; eat seafood Eat more beans and legumes Eat low fat meats, dairy
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  • 16 As we age, we need More healthy fats (olive, canola oil) Good fats (polyunsaturated/ monounsaturated) As little hydrogenation as possible
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  • 17 Fats and Aging Fat is not necessarily bad for you: 20-35% of our calories should be (good) fat We even need a little saturated fat NO TRANSFATS
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  • 18 As we age, we need to. Focus on smaller portions Eat more slowly Increase our fiber intake
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  • 19 Why is it so hard to eat wisely? Food choices are not always under our control Food comforts us Food is everywhere Eating out is in
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  • 20 What works How do you eat more wisely? Eat often Watch portions Plan for problem foods Keep colorful, foods handy Understand that some foods beckon.. and some foods hum
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  • 21 New Dietary Guidelines* Focus on fruits Vary your veggies Get enough calcium rich foods Make half your grains whole Go lean with protein *www.healthierus.gov/dietaryguidelines
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  • 22 Food as Medicine Presentation: Sharon Johnson M.S. Southern Oregon Research and Extension Service Oregon State University 569 Hanley Road Central Point, Oregon 97502 541-776-7371 x210 s.johnson@oregonstate.edu
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  • 23 Informational sources Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 www.5aDay.org Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Center on Aging Weil Cornell Food and Fitness Advisor, Cornell University Nutrition Concepts and Controversies (Sizer, F. Whitney,E.) Wellness Foods A to Z (University of California Berkley) National Academy of Sciences 2002