IBM informix: compared performance efficiency between physical server and Virtualized serverr

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    05-Dec-2014

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This presentation is about servers virtualization applied to IBM Informix DBMS. It features comparisons between different virtualization technologies, including hardware benchmark and TPC-C benchmark

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<ul><li> 1. VM technology Vs Physical Servers: legends and facts Eric Vercelletto eric.vercelletto@begooden-it.com 1 </li> <li> 2. Me in a nutshell Started my first Informix project in 1986, been an employee of Informix Software in France and Portugal for 11 years, as tech support, trainer and Premium Accounts technical consultant I run Begooden IT Consulting , an IBM ISV company, exclusively focused on Informix technology services. I do what an Informix customer would expect from an Informix expert, but I do it with fun and passion. As of now in Europe and Northern Africa. I can also contribute to defend Informix positions in your company Actions include the revival of the BeNeLux Informix User Group (www.informix-clubhouse.org) , and technical leadership for the Informix division in the Infocura Group (Belgium) I run several blogs and websites: http://www.vercelletto.com http://levillageinformix.blogspot.com (in french) http://www.informix-swat.com : a community site (almost non-profit) where you can upload your resume for free if you are looking for an Informix job, assignments or technical missions, and search for a technician if you are an Informix end user company, IBM BP or HR I collaborate with Querix Ltd to evangelize and distribute those beautiful application tools in France and French speaking countries 2 </li> <li> 3. Agenda What is virtualization Who are the actors on the marketplace Advantages of virtualization Types of virtualization Important questions to consider before boarding Comparative benchmarks on x86 linux and PowerLinux 3 </li> <li> 4. Virtualization for beginners Virtualization is software or firmware virtualization is the process of simulating virtual instances of hardware resource within a physical server, into multiple watertight compartments CPUs/cores, Memory, network components, operating systems, storage It is opposed to creating one physical instance of those resources in a physical server, which we have been calling a server for a number of years 4 </li> <li> 5. History of virtualization in 2 mn 1967: IBM Cambridge Scientific Center lab created the first hypervisor named CP-40. It runs on a modified S/360-40 mainframe computer, running CP/CMS Operating System. The key new feature is the support of dynamic address translation which finally allows multiple operation systems to run simultaneously in separate contexts named virtual machines. 1967-1972: extension of this concept so that all the kernel tasks can be virtualized, including interruptions and I/O This system is distributed to customers as a source code to be compiled, with no technical support. 1972: IBM launches VM/370 ported on System/370, with technical support 1985: IBM launches the PR/SM hypervisor for Logical Partitions(LPAR) 1999: Vmware launches Vmware workstation 1.0 on x86 2001: Vmware launches ESX Server 1.0 2005: Microsoft launches Virtual Server 2005 2008: Red Hat acquires Qumranet, including KVM in the package 5 </li> <li> 6. Who is on the marketplace ? 6 </li> <li> 7. Who owns the marketplace ? Some names are on top: Vmware ESX on x86 hosts, hosting Windows and Linux MS Hyper-V on x86 hosts, hosting Windows only IBM PowerVM on PowerXXX, hosting Linux, AIX, i5 OS 7 Oracle VMServer on x86, hosting Windows, Linux, Solaris Kvm on x86, PowerPC and PowerLinux hosting Linux Xen on x86, ARM, hosting Linux, Solaris, MiniOS </li> <li> 8. Why should I virtualize my systems? (says the VM vendor) Many surveys show that physical servers use only 10 to 20% of the their system resources. 8 77% waste 56% waste 85% waste 78% waste 54% waste 90% waste </li> <li> 9. Why should I virtualize my systems? (says the VM vendor) Many surveys show that physical servers use only 10 to 20% of the their system resources. Except for servers hosting some Red RDBMS 9 No waste </li> <li> 10. Why should I virtualize my systems? Consolidation of each system resource into one global resource pool (hypervisor) =&gt; optimized resource usage no rack opening , just configure resource =&gt; faster, more versatile configuration and reaction capacity Native cloning functionality =&gt; simpler and faster deployment Good at High Availability =&gt; better service level to users community Many independent servers in one box =&gt; centralized, simplified administration More control on hardware expenses =&gt; Consequent IT budget savings 10 </li> <li> 11. VM types: type 1,native or bare-metal the physical server runs under a special software layer called a hypervisor (Not a standard OS) The hypervisor directly addresses and manages the hardware ressource in an highly optimized way On top of this OS runs one or several Virtual Machines Typical implementation of bare-metal VMs are IBM LPARs, Vmware ESXi, Oracle VM Server, IBM PowerVM 11 </li> <li> 12. VM types : type 2 or hosted the physical server runs under a standard OS like AIX, linux, Solaris, Windows The hypervisor is one of the regular processes running in that OS The hypervisor can run one or several Virtual Machines Each Virtual Machine runs its own OS. OSs can be different (Win,Linux ) Hosted OS must be hardware compatible with host hardware (No AIX VM on a x86 box) Typical implementation of hosted VM are VmWare Workstation, VmWare Player, VirtualBox, Citrix/Xen, MS Hyper-V 12 </li> <li> 13. 13 Not type1 nor 2: IBM PowerVM </li> <li> 14. Before selecting a VM product: the right questions to ask I have this or that hardware: which VM product can run on this hardware ? Although many available hardware platforms can run a hypervisor, I must identify which ones can run on my hardware Some hardware platforms (x86 for instance), offer more hypervisors brands choice than others Some hardware platforms are very specific: IBM Power, Sun Sparc, etc.. And cannot run any hypervisor brand. 14 </li> <li> 15. Before selecting a VM product: the right questions to ask I want to run this or that OS, which hypervisor can host that OS? Many hypervisors brands can host Linux Fewer hypervisors brands can host Windows Few hypervisors brands can host specific platforms like IBM Power or Sun Sparc Very few hypervisors brands can host different OS flavors 15 </li> <li> 16. Before selecting a VM product: the right questions to ask Not all VM types are efficient to any application Bare metal VMs are more adapted to intensive production applications because they work very close to the hardware level, but they require a fully dedicated hardware. Hosted VMs offer more flexibility than bare metal in the sense that they do not need a dedicated hardware, but they are also less powerful Do I need flexibility, do I need performance or both ? Must I/Should I/Can I virtualize application servers ? Must I/Should I/Can I virtualize database servers ? 16 </li> <li> 17. Virtualization and Application Servers 17 In most cases, application servers do not have specific requirements in terms of hardware or OS configuration In most cases, they are not very sensitive nor demanding in terms of performance In most cases, the applications do not provide any system to ensure high-availability =&gt; In most cases, application servers are good candidates for virtualization for the above listed reasons </li> <li> 18. Virtualization and Database Servers In most cases, database servers have specific requirements in terms of hardware and OS configuration 18 In most cases, they are very sensitive and demanding in terms of performance </li> <li> 19. Virtualization and Database Servers In most cases, database servers have specific requirements in terms of hardware and OS configuration 19 In most cases, they are very sensitive and demanding in terms of performance In all cases, we love and cherish our database servers because we are responsible for them </li> <li> 20. Virtualization and Database Servers In most cases, database servers have specific requirements in terms of hardware and OS configuration 20 In most cases, they are very sensitive and demanding in terms of performance In all cases, we love and cherish our database servers because we are responsible for them Because of these reasons, we are somewhat reluctant to believe in the VM software sales person speech </li> <li> 21. Virtualization and DB Servers What cannot we forget about? Database servers generally do no like running on poor IO sub- systems Database servers generally do not like sharing CPU power with other unpredictable applications Database servers work most of the time in SHMEM, the memory subsystem cannot suffer from consolidation side effects Database servers are generally greedy in terms of Network performance These points are critical factors to consider before choosing a VM technology and configuring it. Hypervisor configuration and administration can get more complex than the vendor said The sold configuration may be undersized and performance issues sub-estimated, even if virtualization is sold as a versatile miracle. Those basic requirements must NOT be sacrified on the altar of the Virtualization 21 </li> <li> 22. What is the IBM Informix Hypervisor Edition ? 22 Hypervisor Edition is packaged to be installed on private cloud appliance It has the full set of Ultimate or Enterprise editions functionality, with no limitations No limitation on scalability No limitation on MACH11 nodes It runs on IBM PureSystems Flavors are AIX and RedHat Linux Licensing works on a PVU metrics model </li> <li> 23. How does Informix failover ? 23 Informix HDR replication mainly consists in replaying the logical logs on the other side HDR logs buffer contents is transported to the replicate on a private tcpip connection HDR knows about SQL transaction state HDR can be integrated in a MACH11 cluster </li> <li> 24. How do VMs failover ? 24 At failure time, a clone image of the Primary server is started on the other server This feature works quite well Storage has to be constantly and thouroughly replicated, unless you want unique storage Storage replication is generally an expense technology Storage replication is a high bandwidth consumer Storage replication is blind about sql transactions </li> <li> 25. VM failover Vs Informix failover ? 25 VM complete failover requires costly storage replication VM Failover is totally blind about db activity If you use VM failover, you wont probably use MAC11 cluster Informix replication replication is much more flexible in the sense that replication levels can be mixed: HDR, ER RSS SDS </li> <li> 26. Now 26 </li> <li> 27. Define the benchmark 27 Objective: obtain elements and figures that can help me to make a ponderate and accurate decision about the choice of a Virtual technology Evaluate VMWare vmplayer on a cheap linux X86_64 No Vmware ESX available on time for evaluation Evaluate IBM PowerVM on P750 PowerLinux (thanks to IBM Montpellier Client Center Benchmark Team) Methodology: compare the efficiency of a physical (or nearly physical) server with the same box used as a Virtual Machine Compare raw hardware performance (CPU power, Storage, Memory) between physical and VM. We will use the unixbench opensource benchmark for this Fire a series of TPCC Benchmark runs to obtain the best possible tpmC and define the inflexion point for physical and VM. We will use our tpc-c for Informix benchmark for this., local esql/c application talking on ipcshm </li> <li> 28....</li></ul>