A summary of teaching with poverty in mind handout 1

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  • 1. 1 A Summary of Teaching with Poverty in Mind Handout 1 Before we begin, I have a few Norms Caffeine

2. 2 If you have a smart phone, get it out. If what I am teaching is not engaging and/or not relevant, you have my permission to use it. Surf the web, check your email, etc. I wont be offended. Ill work on being more engaging. The one Thing I know you want to know How long are you going to talk? 3. 3 There are really two things I want you to get from this sessiona understanding of how poverty impacts the brain and methods to reverse the devastating effects of poverty on the brain. Dont forget: You can copy- paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll. What is the max yearly gross for a family of four to qualify for free and reduced lunch? In the US, the official poverty thresholds are set by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). FR lunch form. In his book, Teaching with Poverty in Mind, Eric Jensen defines poverty as a chronic and debilitating condition that results from multiple adverse synergistic risk factors and affects the mind, body, and soul. 6 4. 4 Minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. The cost of living is approximately double that amount or $14.90 an hour. Take a sheet of scrap paper and tear it in half. Number it 1-5 and see if you can identify the names of the movies you see on the next 5 slides. Situational poverty is generally caused by a sudden crisis or loss and is often temporary. Events causing situational poverty include environmental disasters, divorce, or severe health problems. 6 5. 5 Generational poverty occurs in families where at least two generations have been born into poverty. Families living in this type of poverty are not equipped with the tools to move our of their situations. 6 Absolute poverty, which is rare in the US, involves a scarcity of such necessities as shelter, running water, and food. Familieis who live in absolute poverty tend to focus on day-to-day survival. 6 Urban poverty occurs in areas with at least 50,000 people. The urban poor deal with a complex aggregate of chronic stressors (including crowding, violence, and noise) and are dependent on often-inadequate large-city services. 6 6. 6 Rural poverty occurs in nonmetropolitan areas with populations below 50,000. In rural areas, there are more single-guardian households, and families often have less access to services, support for disabilities, and quality education opportunities. 6 7. 7 Write down on the other scrap sheet of paper whether you were raised in poverty, middle class, or wealth. Dont write your name. Toss the paper at the presenter. Pick up a scrap and form a human graph of poverty, middle class, or wealth. Those first few years are critically important in the development of a childs brain. But the most significant skills he is acquiring during those years arent ones that can be taught with flashcards. The most profound discovery this new generation of neuroscientists has made is the powerful connection between the infant brain chemistry and adult psychology. Lying deep beneath those noble, complex human qualities we call character, these scientists have found, is the mundane, mechanical interaction of specific chemicals in the brains and bodies of developing infants. These scientists have demonstrated that the most reliable way to produce an adult who is brave and curious and kind and prudent is to ensure that when he is an infant, his hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functions well. And how do you do that? Its not magic. First, as much as possible, you protect him from serious trauma and chronic stress; then, even more important, you provide him with a secure, nurturing relationship with at least one parent and ideally two. Thats not the whole secret, but it is a big, big part of it. 181 8. 8 Beginning at birth, the attachment formed between parent and child predicts the quality of future relationships with teachers and peers and plays a leading role in the development of such social functions as curiosity, arousal, emotional regulation, independence, and social competence. 15 Regardless of race, sex, creed, and culture, as humans weve either had or been a parent. Remarkably, despite the fact that over 107 billion people have been born, we all do it differently. Regardless of race, sex, creed, and culture, as humans weve either had or been a parent. Remarkably, despite the fact that over 107 billion people have been born, we all do it differently. 9. 9 From Tiger moms to helicopter dads, there are as many ways to parent as there are parents. From Tiger moms to helicopter dads, there are as many ways to parent as there are parents. From Tiger moms to helicopter dads, there are as many ways to parent as there are parents. 10. 10 From Tiger moms to helicopter dads, there are as many ways to parent as there are parents. In our culture, we face a relentless media assault telling us we arent enough. Buy this laundry soap and your kids will look perfect. Put your child into this program or he will be left behind. In our culture, we face a relentless media assault telling us we arent enough. Buy this laundry soap and your kids will look perfect. Put your child into this program or he will be left behind. 11. 11 In our culture, we face a relentless media assault telling us we arent enough. Buy this laundry soap and your kids will look perfect. Put your child into this program or he will be left behind. We live in a culture of scarcity in a never ___ enough world. Never good enough Never perfect enough Never successful enough Never smart enough Never safe enough Never extraordinary enough Scarcity thrives in a culture where everyone is hyperaware of lack. But as author Brene Brown continues in her book, Daring Greatly, Who we are and how we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how our children will do than what we know about parenting. Brown does not claim to be a parenting expert; in fact, she doubts there are any. But she offers wisdom in encouraging parents to parent from a place of enough rather than scarcity. 12. 12 Scarcity thrives in a culture where everyone is hyperaware of lack. But as author Bren Brown continues in her book, Daring Greatly, Who we are and how we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how our children will do than what we know about parenting. Brown does not claim to be a parenting expert; in fact, she doubts there are any. But she offers wisdom in encouraging parents to parent from a place of enough rather than scarcity. To grow up emotionally healthy, children need A strong, reliable primary caregiver who provides consistent and unconditional love, guidance, and support. Safe, predictable, stable environments. Ten to 20 hours each week of harmonious, reciprocal interactions. This process, known as attunementhelps them develop a wider range of healthy emotions including gratitude, forgiveness, and empathy. Enrichment through personalized, increasingly complex activities. 15 Emotional needs include attunement (parents' reactiveness to their children's emotions); attachment (safe, trustworthy relationships which builds faith in others); and emotional punctuation (to help the brain identify whats correct, positive and worth saving). 13. 13 Emotional needs include attunement (parents' reactiveness to their children's emotions); attachment (safe, trustworthy relationships which builds faith in others); and emotional punctuation (to help the brain identify whats correct, positive and worth saving). Emotional needs include attunement (parents' reactiveness to their children's emotions); attachment (safe, trustworthy relationships which builds faith in others); and emotional punctuation (to help the brain identify whats correct, positive and worth saving). which is great, if your kids won the parent lottery. 14. 14 15. 15 WHAT ARE YOUR CHILDRENS STORIES? Take a moment to think through the names of students in your school who face adversity. What are your childrens stories? Chronic exposure to poverty causes the brain to physically change in a detrimental manner. 2 Poverty involves a complex array of risk factors that adversely affect the population in multiple ways. The four primary risk factors are Emotional and social challenges Acute and chronic stressors Cognitive lags Health and safety issues 7 The prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, crucial for learning, cognition, and working memory, are the areas of the brain most affected by cortisol, the so-called stress hormone. Experiments have demonstrated that exposure to chronic or acute stress actually shrinks neurons in the brains frontal lobesan area that includes the prefrontal cortex and is responsible for such functions as making judgments, planning, and regular impulsivityand can modify and impair the hippocampus in ways that reduce learning. 25 The production of fight-or-flight stress hormones in these children atrophies the areas that control emotional regulation, 16. 16 empathy, social function, and other skills imperative to healthy emotional development. 25 Chronic stress not only diminishes the complexity of neurons in the frontal lobe and the hippocampus but also increases the complexity of neurons in the amygdala, the brains emotion center. This increased complexity may make the stressed brains neurons far more sensitive to memory modulation than neurons in the nonstressed brains. In chronically stressed kids, the combined effects on the hippocampus and the amygdala may be precisely what facilitates emotional memory (the aspect of memory that encompasses highly salient memories of events such as divorce, abuse, trauma, death, or abandonment) and reduces declarative memory (the aspect of memory that stores standard knowledge and learning). 25-26 Weak or anxious attachments formed by infants in poverty become the basis for full-blown insecurity during the early childhood years. 15 In impoveri