Testin g overall ability

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Testing, education

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<ul><li> 1. TESTING OVERALL ABILITY Paola Enrquez D. 4.14.14 </li></ul> <p> 2. Obtain separate information on each of the language abilities Estimate candidates overall ability Previous chapters 3. PROFICIENCY TESTS Number of components Specificiations for the individual components Indication of the weight that e/component has Add scores = overall ability Individual scores may be ignored 4. OVERALL ABILITY Commonsense idea that someone can be good (quite good, poor) at a language Performance in one skill is usually a reasonable predictor of performance in another Skills share some features (vocabulary, grammar) 5. TECHNIQUES FOR TESTING OVERALL ABILITY Reduced redundancy More information available than what is needed NS can cope well when redundancy is reduced Deliberate reduction of redundancy for estimating NNS language ability 6. CLOZE PROCEDURE Remove words from a passage Attempt to replace the original words Blanks usually about every 7th word 7. CLOZE PROCEDURE Considered as a language testing panacea To replace the word -&gt; go beyond the immediate context Make use of the abilities that underlay language performance Easy to construct, administer and score The chosen passage did not matter neither the deleted words 8. CLOZE PROCEDURE Considered as a language testing panacea To replace the word -&gt; go beyond the immediate context Make use of the abilities that underlay language performance Easy to construct, administer and score The chosen passage did not matter neither the deleted words Do you agree or not? 9. CLOZE PROCEDURE Different passages gave different results Deletion of different words gave different results Close examination of the context Intelligent &amp; educated NS varied quite considerably in predicting the words Unfortunately 10. SELECTED DELETION CLOZE Careful selection of texts Careful selection of words to delete Avoid problematical items impossible to predict the missing word 11. CONVERSATIONAL CLOZE To reflect oral as well as written ability Passages representing spoken language Kind of language that is relevant for the overall ability 12. CONVERSATIONAL CLOZE 13. ADVICE ON CREATING CLOZE TYPE PASSAGES Appropriate level of difficulty Appropriate style Present a couple of uninterrupted sentences Deletions should be made at every 8th to 10th word Try the passage with NS Determine the range of acceptable responses Devise clear instructions Test takers should be familiar with the technique Scores are not directly interpretable Scoring is easier in this layout -&gt; 14. ADVICE ON CREATING CLOZE TYPE PASSAGES 15. MINI-CLOZE ITEMS Cover the structures and vocabulary we want to Limited as to what features of language can be tested Once a passage is chosen Include a number of passages 16. THE C-TEST The 2nd half of every 2nd word is deleted Exact scoring Shorter (and so more) passages are possible 17. THE C-TEST The 2nd half of every 2nd word is deleted Exact scoring Shorter (and so more) passages are possible Disadvantages ? 18. THE C-TEST The 2nd half of every 2nd word is deleted Exact scoring Shorter (and so more) passages are possible Puzzle-like nature Harder to read Correct answers can often be found in the surrounding text Disadvantages 19. DICTATION The order of word is given Words are given It is possible to identify words from context Word order Vocabulary Aural perception Does not test 1960 Misguided 20. DICTATION The order of word is given Words are given It is possible to identify words from context Spelling Punctuation Tests 1960 Misguided 21. DICTATION Word order is not given Words are not given Only a stream of sound is heard decoded, stored, and recreated Identify words from context = desired ability End of the decade 22. DICTATION Results similar to the ones from cloze tests Includes listening ability Easy to create Easy to administer End of the decade Advantages Disadvantage Not easy to score 23. DICTATION Scoring # of words appearing in their original sequence Misspelled words taken as correct as long as no phonological rule is broken Time- consuming Tedious with poorer students 24. PARTIAL DICTATION Part of what is dictated is already printed Fill in the gaps Scoring is likely to be more reliable 25. CONSIDERATIONS FOR DICTATION Break passages into stretches that will be spoken without a break Read the entire passage straight through Read out stretches, not too slowly Give enough time to write down Spell silently the stretch twice 26. TESTS FOR YOUNG LEARNERS 27. 5 TO 12 YEARS OLD 28. WHY TEST YOUNG LANGUAGE LEARNERS Check if the teaching programme is effective Develop positive attitudes towards assessment 29. SOME CONSIDERATIONS Relative short attention span Enjoy stories and play Respond well to pictures, attractive typography, colour Not long Brief Varied 30. SOME CONSIDERATIONS L1 &amp; cognitive abilities are still developing Learn through social interaction Teaching &amp; learning involve integrated tasks 31. SOME CONSIDERATIONS Sympathetic teachers Familiar surroundings Understandable instructions Easy tasks at the beginning -&gt; confidence 32. TECHNIQUES TO TEST LISTENING Placing objects or identifying people Multiple choice pictures Colour and draw on existing line drawing Information transfer 33. TECHNIQUES TO TEST READING Multiple choice Pictures 34. TECHNIQUES TO TEST WRITING Anagram with picture Cartoon story Gap filling with pictures 35. TECHNIQUES FOR TESTING ORAL ABILITY Straightforward questions about the child and their family Direct questions from a scene in a card Ask for differences among cards with pictures Tell a story from a set of pictures From a set, identify an element that does not belong and explain why Describe classmates Guess cards among students </p>