Teaching centered instructional data teams

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<ul><li> 1. Teaching-CenteredInstructional Data Teams Erin Baileybailey@educationconnection.org </li> <li> 2. Objectives: Participants will Understand how the data team model works Understand the connection between adult actions and student outcomes Seek a change in professional practice to enhance student achievement EBailey, Education Connection 2 </li> <li> 3. Lets get thinking What are the characteristics of Collaborate effective co+ labor collaboration? What are the products that result from effective collaboration? Adapted from ALareau EBailey, Education Connection 3 </li> <li> 4. The Leadership &amp; Learning Center Matrix (Reeves) Lucky Leading High results, low High results, highEffects/Results understanding of understanding of antecedents (stud.out.) antecedents Replication of success likely Replication of success unlikely Losing Learning Low results, low Low results, high understanding of understanding of antecedents antecedents Replication of mistakes unlikely Replication of failure likely Antecedents/Cause Data (Adult Actions) EBailey, Education Connection 4 </li> <li> 5. Principles of the Matrix1. Student outcomes are a direct result of the actions of the adults.2. If we get the adult actions right, the student outcomes will follow.3. Collect more data on adult actions.4. If the adult action doesnt result in improved student outcomes, stop doing it.5. If the adult action results in improved student outcomes, continue it and make it better. EBailey, Education Connection 5 </li> <li> 6. A quick word on ROLES, NORMS AND AGENDAS Take a look at the models provided Discuss with a partner or group Ask questions! EBailey, Education Connection 6 </li> <li> 7. The Teaching Centered way Monitor Determine the impact of Adult school-wide Actions concern Define Identify the measures of Problem(s) of improvement Practice Develop and Implement a Plan of Action EBailey, Education Connection 7 </li> <li> 8. Aligning to benefit teaching practice and student achievement Identify the Celebrate problem of practice successes through student work analysis Brainstorm and select Monitor impact of instructional strategies Adult Actions which will impact the Problem of Practice Develop a plan of action and define measures of Improvement Collect and chart data and set a SMART goal EBailey, Education Connection 8 </li> <li> 9. Learner Centered Problem a problem of understanding or skill that underlies student performance on assessments. The problem is about LEARNING not that the learners are the problem. This is about a problem experienced by many students and if solved, would help meet your larger goals for students.( A. Lareau adapted from Data Wise Murnane et.al. 2010) EBailey, Education Connection 9 </li> <li> 10. Problem of Practice an expression of the student learning problem and the teaching related to that problem, and is an integration of analysis of both assessment and instructional data. The problem of practice should Include learning and teaching Be specific and fine grained Be a problem within the schools control Be a problem that if solved will mean progress toward some larger goal( A. Lareau adapted from Data Wise Murnane et.al. 2010) EBailey, Education Connection 10 </li> <li> 11. What do we want our students to Know? Understand? Be able to do? EBailey, Education Connection 11 </li> <li> 12. KUDs UNDERSTAND DO KNOW Concepts Discipline-Specific Skills Facts Macro-Concepts Thinking Skills Principles Planning Skills Vocabulary Content-Specific laws Collaboration Skills Dates Statements of Truth Places Names EBailey, Education Connection Carol Tomlinson 12 </li> <li> 13. Sample ELA/Literacy CCSS CCSS.2.R.L.2 Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. KNOW UNDERSTAND DO Prior nouns verbs knowledge EBailey, Education Connection 13 </li> <li> 14. Sample Math CCSS CCSS.2.MD.10Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent adata set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, andcompare problems using information presented in a bar graph. KNOW UNDERSTAND DO EBailey, Education Connection 14 </li> <li> 15. KUDs UNDERSTAND DOKNOW EBailey, Education Connection 15 </li> <li> 16. Unwrapping Standards vs Identifying KUDsUnwrapping Standards Identifying KUDs Usually done by central Completed by classroom office personnel/SDE teacher (s) of a targeted unit Identifies big ideas The process may capitalize on essential questions, and the essential questions and concepts, by grade level large conceptual understandings May be accompanied by completed by central office/SDE the development of Takes a finer-grain approach common assessments to identifying what students should know, understand and be able to do at the completion of a unit EBailey, Education Connection 16 </li> <li> 17. Understanding KUDs Definition Examples Most often There are 50 states.Know represented in Thomas Jefferson bullet form: 1492 Facts The Continental Dates Divide Definitions Multiplication tables Rules Rules of soccer Names of people Primary colors PlacesStrickland, C. A. (2009). Professional development for differentiating instruction. Alexandria: VA: ASCD. EBailey, Education Connection 17 </li> <li> 18. Understanding KUDs Definition Examples Best stated I want Multiplication isUnder students to another way to do-stand understand THAT.. addition. Big Ideas People migrate to meet Essential basic needs. Understandings System parts are Principles interdependent. The point of a Writers use tools to discipline shape their craft. EBailey, Education Connection 18Strickland, C. A. (2009). Professional development for differentiating instruction. Alexandria: VA: ASCD. </li> <li> 19. Understanding KUDs Definition Examples The skills of a Analyze a text forDo discipline, including: meaning Basic skills Solve a problem to find Communication perimeter Thinking Write a well-supported (analytical, argument critical, creative) Contribute to the Planning success of a group Evaluating Sort buttons into two pilesStrickland, C. A. (2009). Professional development for differentiating instruction. Alexandria: VA: ASCD. EBailey, Education Connection 19 </li> <li> 20. Creating a Common Assessment Take a look at the sheet provided Lets look at a few examples of Common Assessments (pre/ post) Whats a summative? a benchmark? EBailey, Education Connection 20 </li> <li> 21. Looking at Student Work (LASW) The Collaborative Assessment Conference EBailey, Education Connection 21 </li> <li> 22. Research Based Instructional Strategies Identifying Similarities and Differences Summarizing and Note taking Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition Homework and Practice Nonlinguistic Representations Cooperative Learning Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback Generating and Testing Hypotheses Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Nonfiction Writing CRISS strategies EBailey, Education Connection 22 </li> <li> 23. Evidence of Instructional Strategy Implementation Strategy What adults What students What implemented are doing are producing classroom (audible and formative observable) assessments indicate. Describe how student work isStudent performance improvingGoalProficientFar to goIn need ofextensivesupport EBailey, Education Connection 23 </li> <li> 24. Where do we start?1. Creating a Common Assessment 2. Collect evidence ofand Analyzing Student work using Instructional Strategythe Collaborative Assessment ImplementationConference Protocol EBailey, Education Connection 24 </li> <li> 25. Questions? Next up, Goal upon returning to school, set up roles and norms. Focus on analyzing student work and collecting evidence of instructional strategy implementation CHECKING in at Forbes on 12/12, Vogel Wetmore on 12/14 and Southwest on 12/16 ALWAYS available for questions or help via email or phone bailey@educationconnectio...</li></ul>

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