Stuart Dunn: Contested Geographies, Captive Audiences: Frontiers and Their Public Meaning(s)

  • View
    9

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Stuart Dunn: Contested Geographies, Captive Audiences: Frontiers and Their Public Meaning(s)

  1. 1. Contested Geographies, Captive Audiences: Frontiers and Their Public Meaning(s) Stuart Dunn, KCL Strand Symposium on Public Engagement 26th June 2015 stuart.dunn@kcl.ac.uk @StuartDunnCerCh
  2. 2. Frontiers - Objects, ideas, identities, histories
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. J. Richardson RE, Cyprus: A Guide, 1881
  5. 5. Frontiers: Public objects
  6. 6. Frontiers: Public objects
  7. 7. 12 The spatial configuration of history (Azaryahu and Foote 2008) THE SPATIAL TURN
  8. 8. 13 Birdoswald/Gilsland
  9. 9. 14
  10. 10. 15 Image Source: http://old.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=24739&start=0&sid=c1e2eadc854c7d5f9 401ea8e936ac6e8
  11. 11. Per Lineam Valli Bede (AD. 731) It as called by ancient writers VALLUM BARBARICUM, PRAETENTURA and Clusura by Dion. MURUS, PICTS-WALL Camden (1586)
  12. 12. [The German limes] had not, like the Britannic Wall, the object of checking the invasion of the enemy the Romans in Upper Germany did not confront their neighbours as the confronted the Highlanders of Britain, in whose presence the province was always in a state of siege Mommsen (1885) The Roman Wall is a great fortification intended to act not only as a fence against a northern enemy, but to be used as the basis of military operations against a foe on either side of it John Collingwood Bruce (1886)
  13. 13. 19
  14. 14. 20 English Heritage and the National Trust delimit and control access to the Wall. These authoritative interpretations and recommended route ways delimit the bodily encounter with the Wall and this affects the physical intelligibility of the experience of the landscape Nesbitt and Tolia-Kelly (2009)
  15. 15. Frontiers - Objects, ideas, identities, histories