Mainstreaming cl in_education_ppt_en

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  • 1.SESSION 1International policy frameworks onchild labour and educationMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes

2. Session aims Providean overview of internationalframeworks on child labour and education Provide a picture of the global extent ofchild labourMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 3. Child labour and Education for All Tacklingchild labour and the international effort to promote Education for All are closely related objectives 67 million primary aged children and 71 million lower secondary aged children are not in school 153 million child labourers aged 5-14 The international community has a target of achieving basic education for all children by 2015. If to be achieved, child labour must be addressedMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 4. UN Declaration on Human Rights, 1948 Article26 Everyone has the right toeducation. Education shall be free, at leastin the elementary and fundamental stages.Elementary education shall be compulsory.Technical and professional education shallbe made generally available.Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 5. UN Convention on the Rights of theChild, 1989 Article28 recognizes the right of the childto education and requires: primary educationcompulsory and available free to all;development of different forms of secondaryeducation, including general and vocationaleducation, available and accessible to everychild; measures to encourage regularattendance at schools and the reduction ofdropout rates.Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 6. UN Convention on the Rights of theChild, 1989 Article32 recognizes the right of thechild to be protected from economicexploitation and from performing any workthat is likely to be hazardous or to interferewith the childs education, or to be harmfulto the childs health or physical, mental,spiritual, moral or social development.Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 7. ILO Conventions on child labour (1/2) ILOMinimum Age Convention, No. 138(1973) The Minimum Ageshall be notless than the age of completion ofcompulsory schooling .Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 8. ILO Conventions on child labour (2/2) ILOWorst Forms of Child LabourConvention, No. 182 (1999): EachMember shall, ensure access to freebasic education, and, wherever possibleand appropriate, vocational training, for allchildren removed from the worst forms ofchild labourMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 9. Child labour: Minimum age criteria For developingGeneral countries General minimum age15 years or more14 years Light work 13 years12 years18 years18 yearsHazardous work(16 under certain (16 under certain conditions) conditions)Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 10. Millennium Development Goals (MDG) (2000-2015) MDG2 aims to ensure all children complete primary education MDG 3 aims for equality of education access between boys and girls 90 of the 152 developing countries are considered off track will not reach the goal on current trends. MDG progress report High rates of poverty in rural areas limit educational opportunities because of demands for childrens labour.Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 11. Education for All (EFA) TheWorld Education Forum in Dakar in 2000: international commitment to make basic education a high development priority Set targets for achievement of basic education standards, including universal primary education (UPE), by 2015 The 2007 EFA Global Monitoring Report stated that EFA requires an inclusive approach and called for policies aimed at reaching the unreached, including policies to overcome the need for child labourMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 12. EFA Global Monitoring Report (1/2) Primaryschool aged children not enrolled droppedfrom 105 million to 72 million between 1999 and2007 Progress also on secondary education: enrolment upfrom 60% (1999) to 66% (2007) Rapidprogress in some countries shows impact ofpolitical will and donor support A major challenge remains to enrol and retain allchildren, especially the poor and disadvantagedMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 13. EFA Global Monitoring Report (2/2) Goal of gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 was missed. Only one third reached the target Poor education quality is undermining achievement of EFA. Shortage of qualified teachers. 1.9 million additional primary teachers needed Based on present trends it is likely that more than 100 countries will not achieve UPE by 2015: 56 million children will be out of schoolMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 14. Child Labour, by economic activity(5-17 age group)Not defined (7.5%) Services (25.6%) Agriculture (60.0%) Industry (7.0%)Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 15. Causes of child labour (1/2) povertyand the need for all family members to contribute economically limited access to education institutions or programmes direct or indirect costs of education poor quality of education discriminatory practices in society and in education cultural and/or traditional practices in certain geographical locations or among certain peoples, for example, migrant workers, indigenous populations and lower castesMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 16. Causes of child labour (2/2) employmentpractices where small businesses mayprefer to employ children because they can pay themless than adults the death of parents or guardians from AIDS, creating anew generation of child-headed households armed conflict and children being forced to take up armsor give support in other forms of labourMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 17. Global Task Force on Child Labour and Education for All (GTF) Aninternational partnership in support of Education for All, launched at the EFA High-Level meeting in Beijing in 2005 Members: ILO, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNDP, the World Bank, Education International (EI) and the Global March Against Child Labour. Governments of Brazil and Norway have also been actively involved Objective is to mobilize political will and momentum to mainstream child labour in national and international policy frameworks contributing to EFA objectives, through: strengthening the knowledge base advocacy developing partnershipsMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 18. Question for group work Whatare some of the benefits ofeliminating child labour in your country...... for children?... for society?... for the economy?Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 19. SESSION 2aThe nationalchild labour contextMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 20. Session aims Tohave a clear picture of the nationalchild labour situation Considerthe role of the legislativeframeworkMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 21. Estimates of child labour 5-17 (2008) Total Children in Child Children inchildren employmentlabourers hazardous work (000)(000)%(000)% (000)% World1 586 288 305 66919.3215 269 13.6115 314 7.3 Asia and the Pacific853 895174 46020.4113 607 13.3 48 164 5.6 Latin America and 141 043 18 85113.4 14 125 10.09 436 6.7 the Caribbean Sub-Saharan Africa257 108 84 22932.8 65 064 25.3 38 73615.1 Other regions 334 242 28 1298.422 473 6.718 978 5.7Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 22. The legislative framework NationalGovernment have an obligation to facilitate the rights of children to education and freedom from child labour Review and/or reform of national legislation may be required Issues for consideration: Legislation should be in accordance with Conventions Nos. 138 and 182 Harmonization of legal ages for schooling and employment Expanding coverage of the law Types of work that are likely to harm childrenMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 23. Evidence of child labour Sound knowledge base of the extent andcauses of child labour are required forputting child labour on the national policyagenda Data necessary to support programming Cost/benefit analyses can be useful,particularly for advocacyMainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 24. National data on child labour (1/2) (Informationcan be added here on thenational child labour context. For exampleif there has been a national child laboursurvey or rapid assessment, you may wantto provide key facts)Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 25. National data on child labour (2/2) (Informationcan be added here on thenational child labour context. For exampleif there has been a national child laboursurvey or rapid assessment. If necessaryadd more slides)Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 26. Question for discussion (1/2) 1.What are the main sources of national information on child labour of which you are aware? 2.If recent child labour surveys have been conducted, have their conclusions been summarised?Mainstreaming child labour concerns in education sector plans and programmes 27. Question for Discussion 3.Are there databases that already contain child labour data that have not yet been analysed and used to help build a picture of child labour? 4.Can the information on the geographical concentration of child labour, or occupational focus, be used to support education programming?Mainstream