Gardening sheets alice eastwood

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  • *Purdys onion Allium fimbriatum var. purdyi (AL ee-um fim-bree-AY-tum PURR-di-eye )

    Family: Liliaceae (Lily Family)

    Native to: Local endemic from Lake & Colusa Counties; uncommon near Clear Lake on serpentine/clay outcrops.

    Growth characteristics: perennial bulb mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 1 ft. Herbaceous perennial from an oval bulb with a red-brown outer coat. Completely summer

    deciduous (dies back to the ground); re-emerges with spring rains. Leaves few, pale green, linear,

    from the base.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring April to June. Flowers are a pretty white to pale lavender with darker mid-veins. Flowers in open cluster (umbel) of 20 to 75 flowers on a naked stem. Lovely,

    delicate appearance.

    Uses in the garden: Most useful in rock gardens or in containers. Does well on dry, well-drained slopes. Attractive with other native bulbs, cool-season grasses.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native Alliums.

    Attracts: Little known about interactions probably attracts some small pollinator insects.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to part-shade.

    Soil Likes well-drained soils. Grows in rocky clay soils in nature.

    Water Needs good spring moisture; little to no summer water.

    Fertilizer None.

    Other Inorganic or no mulch.

    Management: Divide bulbs if flowering decreases. ?? May be difficult

    Propagation: from seed: yes by divisions: easy in spring

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 48 4/28/15 * CA native but not native to western Los Angeles county Project SOUND

  • *Coast lily Lilium maritimum (LIL-ee-um muh-RIT-tim-mum)

    Family: Liliaceae (Lily Family)

    Native to: Coastal California from below San Francisco to Mendocino County (formerly in Central Coast); sandstone soils that usually flood sometime during the year in coastal prairies, north coastal

    scrub, bogs, gaps in closed-cone pine forests. Habitat disappearing in the wilds.

    Growth characteristics: perennial bulb mature height: 2-4 ft. mature width: 2-3 ft. Herbaceous perennial from a rhizomatous bulb. Completely summer deciduous (dies back to the

    ground); re-emerges with spring rains. Leaves green, lance-shaped from a basal rosette; smaller

    leaves along flowering stalk. Typical appearance for lily.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in late spring/early summer May to July. Flowers are trumpet shape of lilies, but smaller (1-2 inches) than common garden types. Flowers are nodding, in clusters of

    several to 10 or more, and are not scented. Color is bright red or red-orange, with maroon spots.

    Rolled sepal and petal tips are unique among North American lilies.

    Uses in the garden: Happiest in shady areas that get moderate water. Good under trees or large shrubs adding an old-fashioned, woodsy appearance. Fine in shady mixed beds. Combine with N.

    Coast native grasses like Calamagrostis nutkaensis and bulbs. Also nice in shady pots, where it can

    be given the conditions it needs. Flowers are long-lasting and showy.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native lilies.

    Attracts: Pollinated by hummingbirds and large bees.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Dappled sun to part-shade (best).

    Soil Likes well-drained soils. Grows in sandy soils in nature. pH 5.5-7.5

    Water Occasional summer water after blooming is ok.

    Fertilizer None in ground; strength in spring for containers.

    Other Thin leaf or other organic mulch is ideal.

    Management: Plants are easy to grow in the right conditions; will spread slowly. Cut off dead foliage when it withers. Will hybridize with other lilies.

    Propagation: from seed: likely requires cold-moist treatment by divisions: easy in fall

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 60 4/30/15 * CA native but not native to Western Los Angeles County Project SOUND

  • Indian Milkweed Asclepias eriocarpa (as-KLEP-ee-us air-ee-oh-CAR-puh)

    Family: Asclepiadiceae (Milkweed family)

    Native to: West Coast from WA to Baja CA; locally in Santa Monica & San Gabriel mountains & foothills. Grows in colonies on plains, hills, and valleys, in summer-dry areas and along stream

    sides, primarily in chaparral, oak woodland.

    Growth characteristics: Herbaceous perennial mature height: 2-4 ft. mature width: to 3 ft. Perennial herb from stout woody rootstock. Leaves light green to gray-green, large, hairy and

    succulent-looking. Dies back to ground fall/winter.

    Blooms/fruits: May-Sept. Small pink-crme flowers grow in showy heads above the foliage.

    Uses in the garden: In mixed flower beds, where showy flowers can be appreciated. One of our best butterfly plants, so often included in butterfly gardens. Most attractive if allowed to form a

    good-sized patch. Does NOT do as well in pots. Plant was used as a medicine plant and fiber

    source by Native Californians. Note: All parts of plant are toxic if eaten.

    Sensible substitute for: non-native Milkweeds

    Attracts: Bees, Milkweed Beetles and butterflies (larval food source for Monarch butterfly).

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to part-shade

    Soil Best in well-drained, but tolerates clay soils; any pH is fine

    Water Average needs in spring/summer dont over-water; tolerates some winter-spring flooding

    Fertilizer None needed

    Other May benefit from mulching

    Management: Cut back to ground in winter. Limiting water in summer will keep from becoming invasive. Easy to grow once established. Plant out plants when small resents root disturbance.

    Propagation: from seed: collect pods when ripe (tan) but before they open. Plant fresh seeds in fall in prepared beds. by divisions: divide in fall, at time of first rains. Be sure each piece of rhizome has at least 1 bud. Irrigate until plants are established.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 13, 57 6/27/11 Project SOUND

  • Catalina Isl. Mountain MahoganyCercocarpus traskiae (SIR-co-CARP-us TRASK-ee-eye

    Family: Rosaceae (Rose Family)

    Native to: Endemic to Santa Catalina Island only a few populations left in the wild; rocky slopes of a steep-sided, narrow, dry arroyo in coastal sage scrub community.

    Growth characteristics: woody shrub/tree mature height: 10-18 ft. mature width: 10-12 ft. Large evergreen shrub to small tree. Branches erect to spreading. Leathery oval leaves are very

    hairy beneath. Quite dense foliage. Long-lived are fairly slow-growing. Similar to C. montanus.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring usually Mar-May but may be even earlier. Small flowers lack petals. You might not know this plant is in bloom except for the pollinators that flock to it. Seeds

    have showy long plume plant is very attractive when these are present.

    Uses in the garden: Used as an accent or yard tree in dry gardens. Can be hedged and makes a

    nice hedge, windbreak or narrow screen. Can be combined with other shrubs for a hedgerow.

    Great for seaside or hot gardens. Good on slopes, along roadways. Can even be espaliered along

    a wall or trellis. Excellent choice for Channel Island themed gardens.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native evergreen shrubs (particularly those that are water-guzzlers).

    Attracts: Excellent bird habitat: provides cover, nest sites and seeds for food. Attracts pollinators.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to part-shade (afternoon shade).

    Soil Well-drained sandy or rocky is best.

    Water Zone 1-2 (very occasional; will be drought deciduous) to Zone 2 (deep water when soil becomes dry). Drought tolerant when established. Dont over-water.

    Fertilizer None needed.

    Other

    Management: Does fine with neglect, but can be shaped, pruned and hedged. Prune/hedge in Spring/ summer. Remove suckers soon. Can be coppiced to rejuvenate old plant in late fall/winter.

    Propagation: from seed: long cold-wet treatment by cuttings: semi-soft in fall

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8 2/23/10 Project SOUND

  • * Del Mar Manzanita Arctostaphylos glandulosa ssp. crassifolia (ark-toh-STAF-ih-los gland-you-LOW-suh crass-ih-FOE-lee-uh )

    Family: Ericaceae (Heath Family)

    Native to: Endemic to the south-central coast of San Diego Co. & extreme northwestern Baja California; on coastal bluffs in maritime chaparral plant community < 300 ft. Very rare in the wild.

    Growth characteristics: woody shrub mature height: 3-8 ft. mature width: 4-8 ft. Mounded, small to medium evergreen shrub. Thick, leathery & shiny leaves range from medium

    green more gray-green. Smooth red bark and nice natural shape open like a miniature tree. Re-sprouts after fires/damage from a basal burl.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in winter/early spring. Small. Pale-pink urn-shaped flowers in dense clusters typical of the manzanitas. Very showy in bloom and in summer when the edible berries

    turn a bright red-brown. Make jelly/syrup and Manzanita cider from the berries.

    Uses in the garden: Decorative color, shape make it a natural accent plant like a miniature tree. Fine for informal hedges. Excellent smaller shrub for Chaparral-themed garden. Pair with its

    natural associates: Comarostaphylos, Xylococcus, Quercus and Salvia species. Wonderful sprawling

    over rocks, walls, etc. Quite an adaptable plant in coastal and western L.A. Basin gardens.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native shrubs including Camellia, Abelia, privet, etc.

    Attracts: Excellent habitat plant: provides nectar (for hummingbirds, insect polinators) cover and fruits for food.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun (coast) to part-shade (hot, inland gardens).

    Soil Well-drained sandy or rocky best; slightly acidic (pH 6.00 to 7.60)

    Water No to little water once established (Zone 1 or 1-2); water once in August

    Fertilizer None

    Other Likes an organic mulch; pine needles fine.

    Management: Prune to remove dead branches in dry periods. Sterilize pruner between cuts. This plant needs little maintenance. Looks best when left to shape itself.

    Propagation: from seed: difficult; heat & cold treatment by cuttings: semi-soft wood in fall

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 3, 8, 11, 13, 14 11/30/11 Project SOUND

  • * Mt. Diablo Manzanita Arctostaphylos auriculata (ark-toh-STAF-ih-los aw-rik-yoo-LAY-tuh )

    Family: Ericaceae (Heath Family)

    Native to: Endemic to the western slopes of Mount Diablo, in Contra Costa County ( e San Francisco Bay Area); occurs primarily in chamise or manzanita chaparral. It can also be found as an

    understory shrub in coast live oak woodland, in sandstone-derived soils, elevation: 400'-2000'.

    Growth characteristics: woody shrub mature height: 3-10+ ft. mature width: 3-10+ ft. Evergreen woody shrub, erect/mounded, with gnarled branches. Slow growing. Leaves silvery to

    gray-green, soft/hairy & clasping the stem. Foliage neat & dense different, very attractive.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in winter/early spring. Flowers are small, light pink and urn-shaped typical for manzantas. Profuse blooms contrast beautifully with foliage. Fruit hairy, small, ripe in summer.

    Uses in the garden: Most often used as a specimen plant for its lovely foliage. Can be used as a large background shrub to highlight darker foliage plants. Fine under tall trees with dappled sun.

    Cultivar Diablo Blush is 5-6' tall & wide, with all the characteristics of the species. Knobcone Point is a natural variant that is 6 tall & wide that retains its close-set juvenile leaves, creating a fish scale-like effect unique!.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native shrubs like privet, Raphiolepis, etc.

    Attracts: Excellent habitat plant: provides nectar (hummingbirds & insect pollinators) cover and berries for food.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun (best along coast) to part-shade (hot inland gardens).

    Soil Any well-drained soil; slightly acidic best (6.0-7.5)

    Water Best with occasional summer water (Zone 1-2 to 2); wash off leaves monthly in summer to simulate fog.

    Fertilizer None

    Other Likes organic mulch pine needles great!

    Management: Prune to shape when young (if desired). Remove dead branches in dry season, sterilizing pruners between cuts. Quite low maintenance once established.

    Propagation: from seed: difficult; heat & cold treatment by cuttings: semi-soft wood in fall

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 13 (cultivars) 11/30/11 Project SOUND

  • * Glossy Leaf Manzanita Arctostaphylos nummularia (ark-toh-STAF-ih-los num-yoo-LAIR-ee-uh )

    Family: Ericaceae (Heath Family)

    Native to: Endemic to CA North Coast, Outer North Coast Ranges, w San Francisco Bay Area (Mount Tamalpais, Santa Cruz Mtns); on rocky sites, woodland, coniferous forest, at elevations < 2000 ft.

    Growth characteristics: woody shrub mature height: 2-4+ ft. mature width: 4-6 ft. Low-growing, dense evergreen woody shrub. Variable in height, it can be < 2 ft in rocky exposed

    sites in the wild, usually taller in the garden. Form: prostrate, mounded to upright. Smooth red

    bark and small, dark green leaves with reddish tips. Underside of leaves may be hairy.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in winter or very early spring. Flowers white with pale pink blush. Many small, urn-shaped flowers in bunches, typical of manzanitas. Flowers sweetly scented and showy.

    Small dry apple-like fruits can be used to make jellies, sauces, or manzanita cider.

    Uses in the garden: Most often used in the understory of large trees like pines. Makes a nice woody ground cover or grow as a specimen in a large container. Does best near the coast low cold/heat tolerance. Grow with common associates like Allium unifolium, Mimulus aurantiacus, Baccharis pilularis, Pinus attenuata, Fragaria vesca, Satureja douglasii and Dendromecon rigida.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native shade-tolerant shrubs.

    Attracts: Excellent bird habitat: provides nectar and fruits for food. Pollinated by large bees and attracts hummingbirds.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Afternoon shade except in foggy coastal areas.

    Soil Sandy soils best; likes acidic soils, so amend soils with peat moss.

    Water Likes some summer water (Zone 2-3); spray leaves in summer to simulate fog.

    Fertilizer Low dose acidic fertilizer ever 2-3 years.

    Other Use an organic mulch like bark chips, pine needles.

    Management: Needs little pruning except to prune out dead branches (sterilize pruners with bleach/water solution between cuts).

    Propagation: from seed: fresh seed; short cold-moist treatment by cuttings: semi-soft in fall.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 8, 11, 13 1/29/11 Project SOUND