Foreign capital inflows in India and emerging economies

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A PROJECT REPORT ONFOREIGN CAPITAL INFLOWS IN INDIA AND EMERGING ECONOMIESSUBMITTEDTO THE UNIVERSITY OF MUMBAI

AS A PARTIAL REQUIREMENT FOR COMPLETING POST GRADUATION OFM.COM (BANKING AND FINANCE) SEMESTER 2

SUBMITTED BY:

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OFDR. NEELIMA DIWAKAR

SIES COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS,PLOT NO. 71/72, SION MATUNGA ESTATET.V. CHIDAMBARAM MARG,SION (EAST), MUMBAI 400022.

CERTIFICATEThis is to certify that Ms. ------------ of M.Com (Banking and Finance) Semester II (academic year 2013-2014) has successfully completed the project on FOREIGN CAPITAL INFLOWS IN INDIA AND EMERGING ECONOMIES under the guidance of DR. NEELIMA DIWAKAR

_________________ ___________________ (Project Guide) (Course Co-ordinator)

___________________ ___________________ (External Examiner) (Principal)

Place: MUMBAI Date: ___________DECLARATION

I, ---------- Student M.Com (Banking and Finance) Semester I (academic year 2014-2015) hereby declare that, I have completed the project on FOREIGN CAPITAL INFLOWS IN INDIA AND EMERGING ECONOMIESThe information presented in this project is true and original to the best of my knowledge.

_____________Name: Roll No.:

Place: MUMBAIDate: _________

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to thank the University of Mumbai, for introducing M.Com (Banking and Finance) course, thereby giving its students a platform to be abreast with changing business scenario, with the help of theory as a base and practical as a solution.I am indebted to the reviewer of the project DR. NEELIMA DIWAKAR my project guide who is also our principal, for her support and guidance. I would sincerely like to thank her for all her efforts.Last but not the least; I would like to thank my parents for giving the best education and for their support and contribution without which this project would not have been possible.

________________ Name: Roll no:

SR.NO.CONTENTSPG.NO.

1.INTRODUCTION 7

2.WHAT ARE THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF FDI?8

3.INDIA AND FDI9

4.FDI FLOWS IN INDIA11

5.TRENDS IN FDI FLOWS IN INDIA13

6.FDI POLICY FRAMEWORK IN INDIA14

7.FDI IN: AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR, TECHNOLOGY, FINANCIAL SERVICES, INDIAN BANKING, RETAIL, CONSUMER PRODUCTS, MANUFACTURING SECTOR17-25

8POLITICAL IMPACT OFLARGER FDI26

9.LIMITATIONS28

10.REASON FOR DIS SATISFACTION30

11.CONCLUSION31

12.BIBLOGRAPHY33

INTRODUCTION Foreign capital has significant role for every national economy regardless of its level of development. For the developed countries it is necessary to support sustainable development. For the developing countries, it is used to increase accumulation and rate of investments to create conditions for more intensive economic growth. For the transition countries it is useful to carry out the reforms and cross to open economy, to cross the past long term problems and to create conditions for stable and continuous growth of GDP as well as integration in world economy. But, capital flows from developed to developing countries are worth studying for a number of reasons. Capital inflow can help developing countries with economic development by furnishing them with necessary capital and technology. Capital flows contribute in filling the resource gap in countries where domestic savings are inadequate to finance investment. Neoclassical economists support the view that capital inflows are beneficial because they create new resources for capital accumulation and stimulate growth in developing economies with capital shortage. Capital inflows allow the recipient country to invest and consume more than it produces when the marginal productivity of capital within its borders is higher than in the capital-rich regions of the world. Foreign capital can finance investment and stimulate economic growth, thus helping increase the standard of living in the developing world. Capital flows can increase welfare by enabling household to smooth out their consumption over time and achieve higher levels of consumption. Capital flows can help developed countries achieve a better international diversification of their portfolios and also provide support for pension funds and retirement accounts into the twenty-first century. Capital inflows facilitate the attainment of the millennium development goals and the objective of national economic, empowerment and development strategy. As the economy becomes more open and integrated with the rest of the world, capital flows will contribute significantly to the transformation of the developing economy. However, large capital inflows can also have less desirable macroeconomic effects, including rapid monetary expansion, inflationary pressures, and real exchange rate appreciation and widening current account deficits. Hence, a surge in inflows of the magnitudes seen in recent years may pose serious dilemmas and tradeoffs for economic policy, especially in the present environment of high capital mobility. History has also shown that the global factors affecting foreign investment.DEFINITIONForeign Exchange

Any type of financial instrument that is used to make payments between countries is considered foreign exchange. Examples of foreign exchange assets include foreign currency notes, deposits held in foreign banks, debt obligations of foreign governments and foreign banks, monetary gold, and SDRs.

Foreign Capital Is the source, amount or amount of goods that is introduced in a host country by a foreign country. Getting resources from another country or from outside the boundary of our country.Foreign Capital InflowIncrease in theamountofmoneyavailable from external or foreignsourcesfor thepurchaseof localcapital assetssuchbuildings,land,machines.

EMERGING ECONOMIESAnemerging marketis a country that has some characteristics of adeveloped market, but does not meet standards to be a developed market.This includes countries that may be developed markets in the future or were in the past.The term "frontier market" is used for developing countries with slower economies than "emerging". The economies ofChinaandIndiaare considered to be the largest.The 7 countries with emerging economies are as follows: China, Russia, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil and South Korea.Anemerging market economy(EME) is defined as an economy with low to middle per capita income. Such countries constitute approximately 80% of the global population, and represent about 20% of the world's economies. The term was coined in 1981 by Antoine W. Van Agtmael of the International Finance Corporation of theWorld Bank.Although the term "emerging market" is loosely defined, countries that fall into this category, varying from very big to very small, are usually considered emerging because of their developments and reforms. Hence, even though China is deemed one of the world's economic powerhouses, it is lumped into the category alongside much smaller economies with a great deal less resources, like Tunisia. Both China and Tunisia belong to this category because both have embarked on economic development and reform programs, and have begun to open up their markets and "emerge" onto the global scene. EMEs are considered to be fast-growing economies.

What an EME Looks Like?

EMEs are characterized as transitional, meaning they are in the process of moving from a closed economy to an open market economy while building accountability within the system. Examples include the former Soviet Union and Eastern bloc countries. As an emerging market, a country is embarking on an economic reform program that will lead it to stronger and more responsible economic performance levels, as well as transparency and efficiency in the capital market. An EME will also reform its exchange rate system because a stable local currency builds confidence in an economy, especially when foreigners are considering investing. Exchange rate reforms also reduce the desire for local investors to send their capital abroad (capital flight). Besides implementing reforms, an EME is also most likely receiving aid and guidance from large donor countries and/or world organizations such as the World Bank andInternational Monetary Fund.One key characteristic of the EME is an increase in both local and foreign investment (portfolio and direct). A growth in investment in a country often indicates that the country has been able to build confidence in the local economy. Moreover, foreign investment is a signal that the world has begun to take notice of the emerging market, and when international capital flows are directed toward an EME, the injection of foreign currency into the local economy adds volume to the country's stock market and long-term investment to the infrastructure.For foreign investors or developed-economy businesses, an EME provides an outlet for expansion by serving, for example, as a new place for a new factory or for new sources of revenue. For the recipient country, employment levels rise, labor and managerial skills become more refined, and a sharing and transfer of technology occurs. In the long-run, the EME's overall production levels should rise, increasing itsgross domestic productand eventually lessening the gap between the emerged and emerging worlds.

FOREIGN CAPITAL FLOWS IN INDIAInternational capital flow such as direct and portfolio flows has huge contribution to influence the economic behavior of the developing countries positively. Prof. John P. Lewis pointed ou