Ethics, ePortfolios, and Badges: Envisaging Privacy and Digital Persistence in Student-Level Learning Evidence

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PowerPoint PresentationEthics, ePortfolios, and Badges: Envisaging Privacy and Digital Persistence in Student-Level Learning EvidenceJames E. Willis, III, Ph.D.Research AssociateCenter for Research on Learning and TechnologySchool of Education Indiana University - BloomingtonJoshua QuickGraduate Research AssistantCenter for Research on Learning and TechnologySchool of EducationIndiana University - BloomingtonWhy Add Badges to ePortfolios?Can provide additional useful informationSpecific claims and detailed evidence Context in which content was createdStandardize the inclusion of additional information without cluttering eportfoliosMay simplify the process of defining competenciesMay offload summative credentialing functionsAllows more formative and transformative functionsCan connect eportfolio content to competencies and gradesLearners stack badge URLs in maps or gradebookCan increase value of portfolio content by circulating independentlyBadges and ePortfolios:Some ConnectionsGranular learning data persisting as educational evidence:MineableFindableUsable For and against students? https://www.linkedin.com/topic/ethicsPublicly-Accessible Learning Evidence and DataEfforts to digitalize and catalogue learning artifactsComplexities of privacy, ethics, and evidenceImportance of discussion Everyone thinks of ethics differentlyMultitude of voices to unearth values, latencies, and competing agendas1. When educational data persists, and can be linked to other individual data sources, what are the possible outcomes? Example: An earner decides to remove a cluster of digital data, including badges from a social media site and data from an eportfolio, but finds that copies of the data exist on issuers websites. The earner cannot make the data disappear. Source: Willis, III, J. E., Strunk, V. A., & Hardtner, T. L. (2016). Microcredentials and educational technology: A proposed ethical taxonomy. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/4/microcredentials-and-educational-technology-a-proposed-ethical-taxonomyhttp://www.techrepublic.com/article/cios-need-to-re-brand-themselves-as-drivers-of-digital-innovation-says-eys-david-nichols/2. What obligations do institutions have to protect, retract, or alter learning artifacts in the near and far future? Example: A student embeds open digital badges in her eportfolio, but doesnt realize the badge is only valid for one year. After a year, the microcredential is revoked and displays an invalid message. A potential employer, carefully examining the eportfolio, discovers the invalid badge and decides not to hire the student. Source: Willis, III, J. E., Strunk, V. A., & Hardtner, T. L. (2016). Microcredentials and educational technology: A proposed ethical taxonomy. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/4/microcredentials-and-educational-technology-a-proposed-ethical-taxonomyhttps://www.linkedin.com/pulse/achieving-digital-state-mind-greg-morgan-3. What are practices to help students learn how to control their own learning artifacts? Source: Willis, III, J. E., Strunk, V. A., & Hardtner, T. L. (2016). Microcredentials and educational technology: A proposed ethical taxonomy. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/4/microcredentials-and-educational-technology-a-proposed-ethical-taxonomyExample question: At what point does the expectation of privacy give way to publicly verifiable evidence? http://www.simplicant.com/blog/digital-recruitment-strategy-tips/4. When evidentiary narratives form regarding a students ability, and then become public, can students come to hold false beliefs about their own capabilities? Example: A student receives positive feedback in his social media for his badges and an employer hires him for the evidence contained in his university eportfolio (i.e. an expertise). This surprises the student, however, because the public recognition of his skills differ widely from his own self-perception. http://e15initiative.org/themes/digital-economy/5. When learning evidence is linked between eportfolios and badges, do new ethical questions regarding student privacy emerge? Example: A new data-crawler algorithm carefully examines learning evidence contained in a students eportfolio and linked badges. This algorithm pinpoints three deficiencies in the students overall educational understanding. Ads with specific suggestions of educational content (to make up for the identified deficiencies) begin appearing in various websites the student sees. http://www.idselpaso.com/Summing UpImportance of ethical discourseThinking about the future, measuring the past Intersection of our learning and educational technologies will create new questions Thank you! James E. Willis, III, Ph.D.Research AssociateCenter for Research on Learning and TechnologySchool of Education Indiana University - BloomingtonJoshua QuickDoctoral StudentCenter for Research on Learning and TechnologySchool of EducationIndiana University - Bloomington@Willis3James

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