ePortfolios: Reflecting Quality Learning

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    18-Nov-2014

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  • 1. ePortfolios: Reflecting Quality Learning Celebration and demonstration of the learning journey our school has embarked on. Issues to consider and unpacking a quality example of an ePortfolio artefact.
  • 2. Why use ePortfolios?
    • Becta research: Impact of e-Portfolios on Learning
    • Key findings include:
    • e-portfolios benefit learning most effectively when considered as part of a joined-up teaching and learning approach, rather than as a discrete entity. The approach should include online repositories, planning and communication tools, and opportunities for both students and teachers to draw out and present e-portfolios at particular times and for particular purposes. There is then likely to be substantial impact on both learning processes and learning outcomes.
    • e-portfolio processes support both pastoral or social needs and curriculum outcomes
    • e-portfolio processes and tools for organisation and communication support the learning outcomes of students with a wide range of abilities
    • e-portfolios make progress and attainment more obvious to both teachers and students, because viewing and revisiting the repository of work reveals development, achievements, strengths and weaknesses
  • 3. Positive Outcomes
    • Students are more actively involved in their learning
    • Caregivers are given up to date information about where their child is at
    • Teaching and learning is more focused
    • Improved school-home relationships
    • Learning celebrated with a wider audience
    • Folio samples are not static and continue to be interacted with
    • Evidence can be mixed media e.g. video
  • 4. Issues to consider
    • Infrastructure: Do you have the resources to sustain frequent and consistent use of the internet?
    • Time: Are teachers prepared to spend time adjusting their practice?
    • Resourcing: Scanners? Projectors? Computers? Administrator?
    • Parent access to internet: Library? After school access to computer suites?
  • 5. What is in an ePortfolio?
    • Evidence of progress and achievement
    • A mixture of product and process
    • Samples of standardised/curriculum testing, work samples, summative assessment from all learning areas
    • Artefacts have clear links to learning
    • Feedback from student, peers, teacher and parents
  • 6. First steps
    • Establish the purpose of the ePortfolio
    • Will it replace reporting?
    • Who will own the ePortfolio?
    • Free tools vs. commercial products
    • Does the school actively engage in formative assessment?
    • Will the roll out be school-wide or piloted with a small group of teachers?
  • 7. Personnel
    • Leadership support and encouragement
    • Teaching and learning focus rather than technical
    • Consistency across the school
    • Will the pilot group be a mix of early adopters and reluctant change makers?
    • Outside support and training
    • Key personnel released to manage tools
  • 8. Teaching and Learning
    • Teaching and learning is the key to a successful ePortfolio
    • Understanding of assessment process
    • How much will the child influence the content and direction of the ePortfolio?
    • Lifelong?
  • 9. What should a quality artefact contain?
    • Evidence of the students progress or achievement
    • If reporting against NZC then need clear links to the curriculum and an identified level
    • Learning intention and success criteria to provide guidance and focus for feedback/feed forward
    • Links to planning and assessment
    • Opportunities for students to set and achieve learning goals with artefacts as evidence
  • 10. Examples
    • Look at the following examples
    • Do they have clear learning outlined?
    • Is there an indication of what the sample should contain if it has met the learning intention?
    • Is the success criteria absent? Co-constructed?
    • Are the students engaged in the task?
    • Is there evidence of feedback from students, parents, teacher?
    • Could you make a judgement about the level the student has achieved?
  • 11. Sample 1
  • 12. Sample 2:
  • 13. Sample 3:
  • 14. Sample 4:
  • 15. Sample 4/1:
  • 16. Sample 4/2:
  • 17. Sample 5/1:
  • 18. Sample 5/2:
  • 19. Sample 6:
  • 20. Sample 7:
  • 21. Sample 8:
  • 22. Next steps
    • Developing student understanding
    • Increasing student ownership and responsibility for selecting samples
    • Integrating more mixed media e.g. video
    • Continuing to develop understanding of National Standards and ensuring we are including evidence for OTJ in the ePortfolio
    • Establishing relationships with contributing schools/secondary schools to develop consistency and sustainability
    • Encouraging parental involvement