Engaging Today\'s College Students

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Exciting reasons why it is critical to engage students in the classroom and nifty ideas on how to do such!

Text of Engaging Today\'s College Students

  • 1.ENGAGING TODAYS COLLEGE STUDENTS INCORPORATING STUDENT SUCCESS BEST PRACTICES TO REACH AND MOTIVATE OUR NSU STUDENTS JACQUELINE M. SLAUGHTER, DIRECTOR, NEW AND TRANSFER STUDENT TRANSITION, FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE, NSU

2. A VISION OF STUDENTS TODAY

  • 200 students enrolled in ANTH 200: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology at Kansas State University, Spring 2007.This discusses how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o

3. GENERATION Y CHARACTERISTICS STUDENTS BORN BETWEEN 1977-1997

  • Generation Y is cynical.Baby Boomers started out optimistic and political involved, but became disillusioned during the turbulent 1960s. Generation Ystarted outdisillusioned. They came of age during events such as 9/11 and the Monica Lewinsky scandal, and have little trust in government or other authority figures.
  • Generation Y has a non-existent attention span.College students have always gotten bored easily, but the attention span of this group is especially low. This is a generation of remote controls, hyperlinks, and MTV. Professors have their work cut out for them.
  • Generation Y loves consumerism.Advertisers love Generation Y because they are such a large demographic group, and because young people are easier to market to than older ones. Thus, Generation Y has grown up accustomed to businesses trying to win their favor. In the U.S., this is the first generation who grew up with advertisements all over their high schools and fast food in the school cafeteria.
  • Generation Y is extremely comfortable with technology . This is the first generation that has no real memory of life without computers,cell phones , and digital music, and members of Generation Y laugh at people who dont have these technologies. Walk around any college campus between classes, and you might see half of the students talking on their phones or listening to their iPods (or doing this during class, whichdrives professors crazy ).
  • http://collegeuniversity.suite101.com/article.cfm/generation_y

4. MY GOALS TODAY

  • Introduce student engagement and the purpose.
  • Introduce my passion and commitment to the process.
  • Share some experiences that I have had.
  • Discuss engagement using the paradigm of freshman year engagement, but will have applicable appeal to all instructors.

5. LETS DO THIS FIRST

  • Engagement comes from the 17 thcentury French word engager which means to pledge.
  • http://www.bearmedicineherbals.com
  • Engagement to pledge, to attract, and to hold fast.http://www.reference.com/browse/engage
  • Engagement means involvement.influencing students to be motivated to take an active part in their college experience, both curricular and co-curricular.

6. WHY ENGAGE OUR STUDENTS?

  • Retention, Retention, Retention!!!
  • Students who miss even 1 class period during first 4 weeks, are more likely to not persist in the first year than students who attend each class sessions.
  • Watch those early absences.
  • Institutions of higher education are reevaluating teaching and considering changing faculty reward systems correspondingly.
  • Teaching with technology requires us to reevaluate not only what we teach, but how and why we teach it.
  • Employers are looking for graduates to have real world skills and readiness for the workforce.
  • A movement to assess student learning is sweeping our colleges and universities.
  • (Constance Staley, 1999)

7. EXPERTS SAY:

  • Vincent Tinto, national expert in student retention states: An engaging learning environment, not retention programs per se, is the key to helping students persist in their studies.
  • Alexander Astin: Astins Theory of Involvement:Students learn more the more they are involved in both the academic and social aspects of the collegiate experience. An involved student is one who devotes considerable energy to academics, spends much time on campus, participates actively in student organizations and activities, and interacts often with faculty (Astin, 1984, p.292).

8. CHICKERING AND GAMSON (1987)

  • Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education.
  • Encourage Student/Faculty Contact
  • Encourage Cooperation Among Students
  • Encourage Active Learning
  • Give Prompt Feedback
  • Emphasize Time on Task
  • Communicate High Expectations
  • Respect Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning

9. HIGHER EDUCATION BACKGROUND

  • Who am I?
  • An avid and enthusiastic college student administrator.I began my experience with higher education at the tender age of 4.
  • I come from a family very invested in science and engineering and they have made many contributions in such.
  • In the 1970s I was intrigued with the sciences and technology as I went to my fathers work.He was working as an engineer and he introduced me to what science and engineering was.
  • Received my career beginnings at the UMCP, once graduating from Hampton University in 1987 and higher education became my passion ever since.
  • Began in 1994 as the Retention Coordinator for the Minority Engineering Program at Cal State LA then became the Associate Director. Served as NSBE advisor from 1995-1999.

10. MINORITY ENGINEERING INTEREST

  • Mentored by Raymond B. LandisDean of Engineering at California State University, Los Angeles for 16 years.
  • Uri Triesman model has been implementedfocus on assisting minority students with excelling in mathematics and engineering.
  • Father of MEPfounded the first Minority Engineering Program in the nation at California State University, Northridge in 1973. He utilized collaborative learning paradigms, freshman seminar courses, academic enrichment workshops, 24 hour study room, NSBE and SHPE organizations and enthusiastic corporate partners.
  • Now, 20 engineering schools in California have replicated the MEP Program, which is a national model for engineering education for students of color.

11. A TEXT TO USE

  • My experiences working with INROADS/Los Angeles, a training and development firm,showed me that the book Seven Habits for Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey was an effective way to change paradigms.
  • INROADS students were given a copy of the book in order to teach them the 7 habits that they could employ to help them to be better stewards of their time, and decision making.

12. AN IDEA WAS BORN

  • When the MEP director stated that they were disenchanted with their current text and that they needed a more relevant vehicle to get positive study behaviors acrossthis was all I needed.
  • I illustrated to the MEP Director and the Dean of Engineering my success in using the 7 Habits and asked if I could adopt this text for our students.
  • I was met with much resistance as they discussed the fact that it was a book written for business executives and not one that was appropriate for 18 year olds.
  • I asked that they give me an opportunity to prove that I could adopt my lectures, discussions, and activities in order to make it relevant.

13. 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE

  • A pilot was allowed for me to adopt the text for the quarter with the understanding that at the end of the quarter, we would evaluate the progress.
  • 10 weeks in the quarter.Each week, I introduced a particular habit.The remaining weeks we did applications of the habits and had guest speakers.
  • Students became quite excited about being in class each session.
  • The examples used were relevant to what they were struggling with and it became a rich and inspiring experience for all of us.

14. HABIT ONE

  • Be Proactive:Importance of students taking themselves seriously as college students.
  • Students came to college to begin their studies and ostensibly to employ the behaviors that will enable them to be successful.We discussed the importance of proactivity as opposed to reactivity.
  • We discussed meeting with their professors during their office hours, not just when they had problems but also to introduce themselves formally.
  • We discussed the importance of going to supplemental instruction, tutoring in order that they could keep up with the math and physics courses that they were studying.

15. HABIT TWO

  • Begin with the End in MindWe introduced this by asking them to imagine their graduation day.We ask them to imagine as they are sitting with their fellow engineering students and to reflect back on to their freshman year and the habits or behaviors that helped them to get to where they are now.
  • Engineering positionswe illustrated the importance of students receiving academic excellence in order that they could compete for the myriad of positions that would be available to them in the future.

16. HABIT THREE

  • Put First Things Firstthis was the Time Management Chapter.In this Chapter, it was key that students l