26
Differentiating Supervision Principals’ and Leaders’ Roles

Differentiated Supervision

  • Upload
    brian

  • View
    4.024

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Differentiated Supervision

Differentiating Supervision

Principals’ and Leaders’ Roles

Page 2: Differentiated Supervision

Analysis

• Identify classrooms in your school that are closest to full implementation of your vision for learning.

• Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.

• Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.

Page 3: Differentiated Supervision

Analysis

• Identify classrooms in your school that must change the most to reach full implementation of your vision for learning.

• Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.

• Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.

Page 4: Differentiated Supervision

Appraise

• Consider one area of teacher practice that is crucial to your desired student achievement. Rank your classrooms along this continuum.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Most Full

Change Implementation

Needed

Page 5: Differentiated Supervision

Analysis

• Consider the bottom half of the implementation continuum. You might want to select one area… What skills do teachers in those classrooms need to internalize in order to obtain the student behaviors you desire?

Page 6: Differentiated Supervision

Evaluation/Appraisal

Select one skill set that you believe is most important. ________________

Rank teachers according to this system:

• Unwilling• Unaware• Getting Ready• Started• Developing

Page 7: Differentiated Supervision

UnconsciouslyUnconsciouslyTalentedTalented

UnconsciouslyUnconsciouslyUnskilledUnskilled

ConsciouslyConsciouslyUnskilledUnskilled

ConsciouslyConsciouslySkilledSkilled

Unconsciously Unconsciously SkilledSkilled

Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development LadderLadder

Gordon’s SkillGordon’s SkillDevelopment LadderDevelopment Ladder

The Art of TeachingThe Art of Teaching

Page 8: Differentiated Supervision

Analysis

What is needed for the teachers at each spot ?

• Unwilling

• Unaware

• Getting Ready

• Started• Developing

Page 9: Differentiated Supervision

What’s needed? Who provides it?

EVALUATIONOutside Criteria

SUPERVISION

MENTORING

PEER COACHINGTeacher’s Choice

Page 10: Differentiated Supervision

KEY ELEMENTS

•KNOWLEDGE•MODEL•PRACTICE•OBSERVATION WITH FEEDBACK•ONGOING COACHING

Joyce and Showers

Page 11: Differentiated Supervision

KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE• WHYWHY RESEARCH RESEARCH

FORMALFORMAL INFORMALINFORMAL

• HOW TOHOW TO COMPLEX to SIMPLECOMPLEX to SIMPLE

Page 12: Differentiated Supervision

MODELMODEL

Page 13: Differentiated Supervision

PRACTICEPRACTICE

• SAFE SAFE ENVIRONMENTENVIRONMENT

• FEEDBACKFEEDBACK

• Twenty to thirty repetitions Twenty to thirty repetitions • over an eight to ten week over an eight to ten week

period.period.

Page 14: Differentiated Supervision

Two Opportunities for Observation Two Opportunities for Observation with Feedbackwith Feedback

• Practice Environment: Practice Environment: ex. Workshopsex. Workshops

• Classroom Situations:Classroom Situations: ex. Coachingex. Coaching

Page 15: Differentiated Supervision

Joyce/Showers ResearchJoyce/Showers ResearchFigure 5.2Figure 5.2

Training Components and Attainment of Outcomes Training Components and Attainment of Outcomes in Terms of Percent of Participantsin Terms of Percent of Participants

Components

Study of Theory

Demonstrations

Practice

Peer Coaching

Beverly Joyce and Bruce Showers (2002) Student Achievement Through Staff Development 3rd Edition. Ch. 5: Designing Training and Peer Coaching: Our Needs for Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Knowledge(thorough)

10

30

60

95

Skill (strong)

5

20

60

95

Transfer (executive implementation)

0

0

5

95

— OUTCOMES —

Page 16: Differentiated Supervision

Learning DipLearning Dippg45pg45

Page 17: Differentiated Supervision

Understanding the Connection…Understanding the Connection…

In order to see the link In order to see the link between teacher behavior between teacher behavior and student achievement and student achievement let’s use an example of:let’s use an example of:

• Higher Order Higher Order Questioning StrategiesQuestioning Strategies

Page 18: Differentiated Supervision

Examine the relationship between Examine the relationship between students and teacher in questioningstudents and teacher in questioning

Page 19: Differentiated Supervision

Higher Order Questioning: Skill Analysis

• Teacher Teacher Behavior(T1)Behavior(T1)

• Write questions Write questions into plans and into plans and start asking start asking questions in class questions in class discussiondiscussion

Student Response Student Response

Page 20: Differentiated Supervision

Higher Order Questioning: Skill Analysis

• Teacher Teacher Behavior(T1)Behavior(T1)

• Write questions Write questions into plans and into plans and start asking start asking questions in class questions in class discussiondiscussion

Student Response Student Response (S1)(S1)

Confusion, Reluctant Confusion, Reluctant to respondto respond

Page 21: Differentiated Supervision

• T1 Write questions T1 Write questions into plans and start into plans and start asking questions in asking questions in class discussionclass discussion

• T2:Continue asking, T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, increase wait time, model thinkingmodel thinking; ;

• S1:Confusion, S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;reluctant to respond;

• S2:Attempt to answer S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;posed questions;

Page 22: Differentiated Supervision

• T1:Write questions,T1:Write questions, start asking;start asking;

• T2:Continue asking, T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, increase wait time, model thinking; model thinking;

• T3:Provides T3:Provides encouragement, encouragement, probing, pausing;probing, pausing;

• S1:Confusion, S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;reluctant to respond;

• S2:Attempt to answer S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;posed questions;

• S3:Successfully S3:Successfully responds;responds;

Page 23: Differentiated Supervision

• T1:Write questions, start asking;

• T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;

• T3:Provides encouragement, probing, pausing;

• T4:Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue;

• S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;

• S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;

• S3:Successfully responds;

• S4:Students debate;

Page 24: Differentiated Supervision

• T1:Write questions, start asking;

• T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;

• T3:Provides encouragement, probing, pausing;

• T4:Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue;

• T5:Provide supportive and conflicting data;

• S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;

• S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;

• S3:Successfully responds;

• S4:Students debate;

• S5:Students pose higher level questions;

Page 25: Differentiated Supervision

Teacher Behavior Changes

Student Responses

Page 26: Differentiated Supervision

Professional Development in Professional Development in Teacher Behavior…Teacher Behavior…

……Leads to Leads to Student AchievementStudent Achievement