Critical Thinking Faculty Development Workshop (feb 2014)

Embed Size (px)

Text of Critical Thinking Faculty Development Workshop (feb 2014)

Slide 1

CT Course Faculty Development Workshop

February 22, 2014Center for Teaching and Learning

1IntroductionsWhat our students see . . .

When they hear the words public health, psychology, math, historyWhat we see in our minds eye. . .

So how do we help our students get

from HERE to HERE?important concepts, course topics, ideas, facts, theories, argumentsHandout #1: Record everything that comes to mind when you think of the most important key ideas, concepts, theories, research methods, etc., that must be addressed in your proposed CT course. 7post-it notes and personal white board to test conceptual frameworkRecord this list of terms, ideas, concepts on post it notes and arrange them on your mobile white board in a way that makes sense to you conceptually 8conceptual framework to someone elsepartners map for inconsistency b/w explanation & representation10how effectively the map represents & integrates course contentReflect in writing on your map and the feedback you received when you explained it. What was confusing to your partners? How could you clarify it? What needs further development? What should be cut for the sake of clarity and elegant simplicity?

11a visual metaphor that clarifies & amplifies the overall structure of knowledge in the course

But why?Students who become cognizant of the conceptual structure of their courses are more likely to employ appropriate discipline-specific learning strategies. (Saroyen, Amundsen, & Donald, 2004)p. 3714

Neo and Co. in the Matrix

Neo outside of the Matrix

Epiphanyhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdkdQtlF-RUBREAK TIMEPurpose of Core IWe all teach and encourage critical thinking in some form or another. So whats new about CT courses?Connections: Helping our students situate critical thinking within a discipline, especially in lower division courses, so they can make connections to other disciplinesEarly Immersion: Capitalizing on opportunities to practice critical thinking through active rather than passive learning, where students have opportunities to DO as well as to OBSERVEFor our studentsexpertise often meansto studywhich equals a way of KNOWING

For professionals in the fieldexpertise often meansto studywhich equals a way of KNOWING

BUT . . .AND . . .For professionals in the fieldexpertise often meansto cultivate a certain habit of mindwhich equals a way of SEEING

AND . . .For professionals in the fieldexpertise often meansto acquire a certain set of practiceswhich equals a way of DOING

Seeing . . .the discipline as a structure of knowledge

then backing up further to see the deep structures of inquiry that connect the disciplines

PERUSE THE MAPS AND LOOK FOR COMMON ELEMENTS

25

Salvador Dali, 1976Gala looking at the Mediterranean Sea which at a distance of 20 meters is transformed into the portrait of Abraham Lincoln (Homage to Rothko)The Meta View of General EducationPeruse the maps of your colleaguesLook for deep structures of inquiry and knowledge making that may link or permeate more than one concept mapJot down your observationsTeaching Habits of Mindusing . . .discipline-specific concept maps& integrative inquiry maps

Instructional strategies? TLA = T + L + ATeaching Habits of Mindusing . . .objects as themselves& objects as metaphorChanging contexts of production

1998, anthology1981, pamphlet1981, toilet paperChanging contexts of productionJUXTAPOSITION of form and contentA literary narrative is not real. (Its fiction!)A literary narrative is not unreal. (Its material--made of ink, glue, paper.)

Literary texts perform certain very real functions in our day-to-day reality.

34Teaching Habits of Mindusing . . .objects as themselves

atoms, books, photons, words, children,terrain, cells, geological formations,shards, families, kidneys, ideas.Instructional strategies? TLA = T + L + A

He put a frame around his painting. Someone else put a frame around him. HE is a text. 36Teaching Habits of Mindusing . . .objects as metaphors

Instructional strategies? TLA = T + L + ADoing. . .the work of the discipline as a professional

then backing up further to see where the skills in a gen ed disciplineconnect to the major

PERUSE THE MAPS AND LOOK FOR COMMON ELEMENTS

38Doing. . .The Big Secret

PERUSE THE MAPS AND LOOK FOR COMMON ELEMENTS

39Teaching a Set of PracticesWhat discipline-specific performance tasks do professionals in your field regularly engage in?Teaching a Set of Practicesusing . . .performance tasks in the classroom

CLA in the ClassroomProblem Based LearningCase Based LearningGamingService LearningTeaching a Set of Practicesusing . . .instructor modelingstudent doing

Reading Like a Literary Scholar:Secondary TextsArmstrong, Nancy. Fiction in the Age of Photography: The Legacy of British Realism. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1999.

The Difference That Realism Makes

That Oliver Twist does not refer to a world in which truth takes a visual form is apparent in the protagonists first view of the city:

A dirtier or more wretched place he had never seen. The street was very narrow and muddy; and the air was impregnated with filthy odours. There were a good many small shops; but the only stock in trade appeared to be heaps of children, who, even at that time of night, were crawling in and out at the doors, or screaming from the inside. The sole places that seemed to prosper, amid the general blight of the place, were the public-houses; and in them the lowest orders of Irish were wrangling with might and main. Covered ways and yards, which here and there diverged from the main street, disclosed little knots of houses, where drunken men and women were positively wallowing in the filth; and from several of the doorways, great ill-looking fellows were cautiously emerging: bound, to all appearance, on no very well-disposed or harmless errands. (49)Everything in this city is identical to its type. Indeed, it is by means of the continuity ensured by repetition of the type that things and people come to have identity as such, as Dickens here compresses the kind of information available in treatises on the moral condition of the working classes for his readers benefit. This passage offers as much auditory and olfactory information as visual description, as if one kind of information (filthy odours) can do as well as any other (heaps of children . . . crawling in and out at the doors, or screaming from the inside). This description is not, in other words, particularly visual. Although he easily conjures up a picture, Dickens feels no inclination to supply colors, textures, or shades of light and dark.

A dirtier or more wretched place he had never seen. The street was very narrow and muddy; and the air was impregnated with filthy odours. There were a good many small shops; but the only stock in trade appeared to be heaps of children, who, even at that time of night, were crawling in and out at the doors, or screaming from the inside. The sole places that seemed to prosper, amid the general blight of the place, were the public-houses; and in them the lowest orders of Irish were wrangling with might and main. Covered ways and yards, which here and there diverged from the main street, disclosed little knots of houses, where drunken men and women were positively wallowing in the filth; and from several of the doorways, great ill-looking fellows were cautiously emerging: bound, to all appearance, on no very well-disposed or harmless errands. (49)Reading Like a Literary Scholar:Primary Texts

Teaching a Set of Practicesusing . . .performance tasksinstructor modeling & student doing

Instructional strategies? TLA = T + L + AThe Unbearable Lightness of CT-nessIntegration of Gen Ed (connections)University Learning Outcomes (authentic immersion)

Integration of Gen Ed: Core IIMathCompositionCommunicationScienceSocial ScienceHumanitiesFine Arts

Integration of Gen Ed: Core IIIntroduce your students to the Core Curriculum and situate your CT course in the context of different disciplinesFurther developments/thoughts on concept mapping?Other ideas?

University Learning OutcomesCommunication FluencyCreative ThinkingEthical and Civic ThinkingInformation LiteracyInquiry Based ThinkingIntegrative ThinkingIntercultural ThinkingMetacognitive ThinkingQuantitative ThinkingHandout #1: Record everything that comes to mind when you think of the most important key ideas, concepts, theories, research methods, etc., that must be addressed in your proposed CT course. 50Handout #1: Record everything that comes to mind when you think of the most important key ideas, concepts, theories, research methods, etc., that must be addressed in your proposed CT course. 51University Learning OutcomesRun a learning outcomes diagnostic the connections activities (anatomy of the disciplines) the immersion activities (teacher-modeling and student-doing)

The Rubiks Cube of Course Design53New in BoxLearning OutcomesTeaching & Learning ActivitiesAssessments54Manipulating the CubeLearning OutcomesTeaching & Learning ActivitiesAssessmentsBasic knowledge of GIS terminologySkill in mapping local topographyExam: multiple ch. & simulation questionLectureDiscussion55Move #1: First LookLearning OutcomesTeaching & Learning ActivitiesAssessmentsBasic knowledge of GIS terminologySkill in mapping local topographyExam: multiple ch. & simulation questionLectureDiscussion56Move #1: Second LookLearning OutcomesTeaching & Learning ActivitiesAssessmentsBasic knowledge of GIS terminologySkill in mapping local topographyExam: multiple ch. & simulation questionLectureDiscussion57Move #1: Third LookLearning O