Crim 4391 homeland security fall15

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Clarke Iakovakis | Research & Instruction Librarian | UHCL Neumann LibraryLibrary Research for CRIM 4391: Homeland SecurityHomeland Security image courtesy Thomas Hawk on Flickr. Licensed under CC BY-NC.

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http://libguides.uhcl.edu/CRIM4391hsu

How much experience do you have doing research using library resources in your research (e.g. article databases, scholarly books?I have not used library resources in my research beforeI have used library resources a littleI have lots of experience using library resources

Follow up whats so hard about getting started, finding articles, etc. Mention that these are all things a librarian can help them with.3

Outline for TodayResearch is InquiryDetermining AuthorityPrinciples of Good Searching Searching in the Research Databases & Library Catalog

Section 1: Research is Inquiry

Screenshot from Sherlock British Broadcasting Company. Retrieved from Tumblr

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Research is an open-ended exploration and engagement with informationAnxiety is normal!Be open-mindedseek divergent perspectives and information that challenges your beliefs, and be skeptical

Curiosity Rover Self-Image courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems. Public Domain.

A literature review is part of the published work referencing related research, theory, and background informationA review of the literature (literature search) may be conducted tounderstand a topichelp you form a problem statementprovide confirmation of an already existing hypothesisanalyze and interpret your own datagain exposure to past, current, and ongoing research about a subject you are exploring for research of your ownReviewing literature

The literature reviewYour research is a small piece in a complicated jigsaw puzzle; it does not exist in isolationYour reader needs to know about the whole jigsaw puzzle and not simply the shade and shape of your particular piece. In a literature review, you are contextualizing your work; you are describing the bigger picture that provides the background and creates the space or gap for your research

"SixPartWoodKnot". Licensed under CC BY-SA via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SixPartWoodKnot.jpg#mediaviewer/File:SixPartWoodKnot.jpgRidley, D. (2012). The literature review: A step-by-step guide for students. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Primary, secondary, and tertiary sourcesPrimary sources are the raw material or first-hand evidenceSecondary sources describe and interpret information from primary sourcesTertiary sources compile and summarize primary and secondary sources

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. (1883). The Arrest.

Press A for TruePress B for False

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Articles providing overviews of topics by synthesizing information gathered from other resources are primary sources

TRUE or FALSE?TRUE or FALSE?

Diaries, news articles, speeches, & interviews are examples of primary sources.

TRUE or FALSE?TRUE or FALSE?

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Section 2: Determining Authority

Benito Mussolini. Public domain image retrieved from Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives collection.

Authority is constructed and contextualAuthority is a type of influence recognized or exerted in a communityDisciplines have acknowledged authorities--scholars & publicationsApproach authoritative perspectives with informed skepticism.

What are some indicators you can use to help determine if information is valid?CRAAP:CurrencyRelevanceAuthorityAccuracyPurpose

Craps table image courtesy Lisa Brewster on Flickr. Licensed under CC-BY-SA

What are some sources of scholarly information?BooksReference worksPeer-reviewed journal articlesGray literatureReports (government, non-governmental organizations)Theses & dissertationsConference proceedingsArchival resources

Computer laptop by Steve Hillebrand, licensed under public domain

What is peer review? A process for establishing authority of scholarly research Experts review the original ideas to certify the accuracy, validity, and value of the results

Chubin, D. E., & Hackett, E. J. (2005). Peer Review. In C. Mitcham (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics (Vol. 3, pp. 1390-1394). Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. Retrieved from http://libproxy.uhcl.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3434900491&v=2.1&u=txshracd2589&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=67e06d81c0d758521a67ba637722e45c

Periodicals (journals, magazines)Peer-reviewedRefereedScholarlyAcademicTradeProfessionalPractitionerIndustryGeneralPopular

(different databases call them different things)19

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Section 3: Research DatabasesScreenshot from Wargames United Artists. Retrieved from Tumblr

Why use a library when I have Google?But wait

This is a question many of you might have. Most of us rely on Google to connect to information. Google has become so ubiquitous it even has its own verb22

tumblr.govWikipediaSubscription databasesPassword-protected websitesrestricted access$$$free accessIllegal contentClassified documentsSurface WebDeep Web

AmazoncnnGoogleads

The surface Web is what most of us think of when we talking about online information. It includes blogs, online stores, news sites, and other content that is discoverable by search engines like Google. The surface web represents only a fraction of all digital information, most of which lives in what is called the Deep Web. This includes restricted information such as password-protected websites and classified documents. As college students, much of the information youll need for your classes lives in the deep web, but its not accessible through search engines like Google and its not free. Access to this content is what academic libraries like us pay for and provide.Theres also a tremendous amount of information thats not online at all.

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Off campus access to subscription databases

If you have problems accessing resources from off campus, call the Reference Desk 281-283-39102001234567

Section 4: Principles of good searching

On the Scent. Image licensed CC-BY on Flickr by stephen bowler.

Dissect this citationAsal, V., & Blum, A. (2005). Holy terror and mass killings? Reexamining the motivations and methods of mass casualty terrorists. International Studies Review, 7(1), 153-155. doi: 10.1111/j.1521-9488.2005.479_8.xWhat is the

Journal nameVolume numberIssue numberAuthors

Article titlePage number rangeYear of publicationDOI

Search Process

SmartArt custom animation effects: stretch and curve up(Intermediate)

To reproduce the SmartArt effects on this slide, do the following:On the Home tab, in the Slides group, click Layout, and then click Blank.On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click SmartArt. In the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box, in the left pane, click List. In the List pane, click Vertical Block List (fourth row, third option from the left), and then click OK to insert the graphic into the slide. Select the graphic, and then click one of the arrows on the left border. In the Type your text here dialog box, enter text for each of the rectangles.Press and hold CTRL, and select each of the second-level rectangles on the slide. Drag the left sizing handle of one of the second-level rectangles to the left 0.5 to increase the width of the second-level rectangles. (Note: The first-level rectangles (rounded rectangles) will decrease in width at the same time.)Select the SmartArt graphic. Under SmartArt Tools, on the Design tab, in the SmartArt Styles group, click SmartArt Styles, and under Best Match for Document select Intense Effect (fifth option from the left).Press and hold CTRL, and then select each of the first-level rectangles (rounded rectangles) in the SmartArt graphic.Under SmartArt Tools, on the Format tab, in the WordArt Styles group, click the arrow to the right of Text Fill, and under Theme Colors select White, Background 1, Darker 25%. (fourth row, first option from the left). Under SmartArt Tools, on the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the arrow to the right of Shape Fill and under Theme Colors select White, Background 1 (first row, first option from the left). Select the top, second-level rectangle in the SmartArt graphic.Under SmartArt Tools, on the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the arrow to the right of Shape Fill and under Theme Colors select Olive Green, Accent 3. (first row, seventh option from the left).Select the center, second-level rectangle in the SmartArt graphic.Under SmartArt Tools, on the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the arrow to the right of Shape Fill and under Theme Colors select Olive Green, Accent 3, Lighter 40% (fourth row, seventh option from the left).Select bottom, second-level rectangle in the SmartArt graphic.Under SmartArt Tools, on the Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click the arrow to the right of Shape Fill and under Theme Colors select Olive Green, Accent 3, Lighter 60% (third row, seventh option from the left).Press and hold CTRL, and select each of the second-level rectangles.On the Home tab, in the Font group, click Text Shadow, and then in the Font Color list, select White, Background 1 (first row, first option from the left).

To reproduce the animation effects on this slide, do the following:On the Animation tab, in the Animation group, click Custom Animation. Select the SmartArt graphic, and then in the Custom Animation task pane, do the following:Click Add Effect, point to Entrance and select More Effects. In the Add Entran