Counselors in the Classroom: Tips and Tricks to Engage High School Students

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Guidance Counselors in the ClassroomPresented by:Brad Wolfenden& Stacey MilgramRMACAC Annual Conference April 2016Take fiveWho among your colleagues is your favorite to work with? Write up a series of statements that talks about what makes them so great to work with. Write the statements in the form of compliments: Youre really good at21-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comAcademic versus Life SkillsYou all use some elements of math, reading, and writing to do your jobsAcademic skills made it possible for you to pursue your careerAcademic skills make it possible for you to do your job31-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comAcademic versus Life SkillsWhich element of the Common Core assesses the value of optimism?Your social and emotional skills make you a great person to work withYour values help you decide what you should do next41-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comOur GoalsDefine the Counselors RoleDescribing the current state of Counselor-Student interactions at your campusSetting Goals (for today and beyond)Explain the value of Social-Emotional LearningIdentify problem perceptions/beliefs in studentsBuild Classroom Activities for Counselors1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comYour Goals What do you want to get out of this session? What do you want to learn? What do you want to talk about? What do you want to do?1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comDefining the role of the Counselor1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comDefining the RoleWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?What skills is the counselor trained to affect?How does the counselor add value to the academic training students receive?How can we measure a counselors impact?81-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comWhy Social-Emotional Learning MattersVan Velsor, P. (2009). School Counselors as Social-Emotional Learning Consultants: Where Do We Begin?. Professional School Counseling, 13(1), 50-58.Durlak, J. A., Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B., Taylor, R. D., & Schellinger, K. B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students social and emotional learning: A metaanalysis of schoolbased universal interventions. Child development, 82(1), 405-432.Social-Emotional LearningDefining Social-Emotional Learningthe process through which children enhance their ability to integrate thinking, feeling, and behaving to achieve important life tasks.10Social-Emotional LearningEmotional IntelligenceSocial Intelligence1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningSocial Intelligencethe ability to understand and deal with people and to act judiciously in human relationshipsEmotional Intelligenceawareness of and appropriate expression of ones own emotionsthe ability to understand others feelings to establish satisfying relationshipssuccessful adaptation to change and its accompanying emotions for effective problem solvingthe ability to generate positive emotions and self-motivate11Social-Emotional LearningResearch repeatedly demonstrates that emotional intelligence and academic success are linkedIn elementary, middle, and high school, emotional intelligence predicts academic success at the next stageAmong university students, high performance predicts high emotional intelligence121-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningAcademic and Career Success requires students stay motivated and stay in schoolAt-risk students who remain resilient and graduate receive SEL from guardians, teachers, and counselors131-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningSelf-awareness, self examination, and decision-making are core SEL competenciesCareer choice and career planning require all of theseSuccess in the workplace requires overcoming emotional deficiencies and self-knowledge141-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningK-6Building a positive self-conceptSpeaking positively about othersUnderstanding other perspectivesCreating classroom rulesBuilding a set of positive values7-12Seeing a place for oneself beyond schoolConnecting effort with successResolving physical conflictsManaging time and stressSolving complex practical problems151-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningSEL is not just a quality modifierExperimental data shows that a student put through a successful SEL program would demonstrate an 11-point percentile gain in academic performance.161-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSocial-Emotional LearningWe know SEL programming is important for all students. What are some issues, though, with implementation?171-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRe-AssessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?181-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comCareer Perceptions, Beliefs, and GoalsPart 1: Student VisionsTurner, S. L., & Conkel Ziebell, J. L. (2011). The career beliefs of inner-city adolescents. Professional School Counseling, 15(1), 1-14.Looking into the FutureWhen your students look into the future, do they see themselves?Students can only strive towards careers that they know aboutStudents must understand the path to a certain career in order to work towards it.Students are far less likely to strive towards careers when they have not seen people that look like themselves in those careers201-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureAdolescents across diverse racial and socio-economic backgrounds have a lot of common valuesMost say that a person can control how satisfied they are with a jobMost say that no one can stand between them and their goalsMost say that uncertainty about the future is okA person should choose a job based on their interests and skills21Looking into the FutureHowever, At-risk, Inner-City Adolescents are also likely to say thatHard work and success are not linkedThere is only one path toward a given goal and that direct competition with their peers is necessary to meet personal goals221-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureIf you only see one path into your chosen future, you are not likely to adapt to problems that ariseStudents need Counselors to teach them decision-making and planning that rewards adaptive views of the world231-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureIf you dont think hard work will pay off, then persistence is likely to become a disappointmentStudents need Counselors to show them real-world examples that demonstrate the value and necessity of effort241-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRe-AssessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?251-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comCareer Perceptions, Beliefs, and GoalsPart 2: Building Realistic Goals1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comBuilding Realistic Goals27Building Realistic Goals28What does a good goal look like for a student?Not every student will have the same goal.Whats good for one student might not be good for another.What do you do when a student has no goals or has unrealistic goals?1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comBuilding Realistic Goals29Building Realistic GoalsStudents need to develop clear, realistic goalsStudents must also have an understanding of the paths to those goals.Breaking down the path to an outcome can make success more approachableSmaller, more immediate targets gives students more opportunities for successFiguring out the smaller steps to a goal can help students reassess the reality of their goal30Building Realistic GoalsHow do we teach students to do this?What issues might students run into with this?How can we address those issues?311-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comBuilding Realistic GoalsWhat are some goals your students have? (Think about both academic and career goals.)How can the goal-setting pyramid be applied to those goals?321-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comBuilding Realistic GoalsCompetition with peers can be constructive, but can also lead to frustration or quitting.Who might be an ally for a student?Why might a student be resistant to asking for help?How can we teach students to approach those others as allies?331-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comBuilding Realistic GoalsHow to Ask for Help:1. Find the right person: do you know why are you going to this person for help? 2. State what you think you know (you have some ideas/knowledge and that youre open to feedback)3. Propose a course of action (youve given the subject some thought)4. Specify the feedback you want: people generally want to be helpful, but they can be more so if you tell them what kind of help youre looking for. 34Re-AssessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?351-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comCareer Perceptions, Beliefs, and GoalsPart 3: Teacher VisionsSciarra, D. T., & Ambrosino, K. E. (2011). Featured Research: Post-Secondary Expectations and Educational Attainment. Professional School Counseling, 14(3), 231-241.West-Olatunji, C., Shure, L., Pringle, R., Adams, T., Lewis, D., & Cholewa, B. (2010). Exploring how school counselors position low-income African American girls as mathematics and science learners. Professional School Counseling, 13(3), 184-195.Looking into the FutureWant to predict if a student will be enrolled in college in 2 years? Ask where they expect to be.A student who says they will only complete high school or less is 23 times more likely to never enroll in collegeA student who says they are likely to complete a 2 year degree is slightly more likely to enroll371-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureDial the clock back to 10th gradeStudents expectations of their post-secondary options are very weak predictors of their actual outcomesHowever: Ask their math teachers. If your Sophomore math teacher thinks you will never go to college, you are 10 times more likely to never enroll381-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureBig surprise, right?One might think that teachers generate beliefs based on student performanceRecently, psychologists have found increasing evidence that the relationship is reversed. Student performance is dramatically impacted by teacher expectations391-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureWho does this hurt the most?Interviews reveal that teachers show students academic and career futures based on expectationsResearch shows that math teachers have the lowest expectations for blacks and Latinos.401-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comLooking into the FutureStudents see the futures we show themUnless students are shown people who look like them in ambitious jobs, they are unlikely to see themselves in those jobsCounselors in the classroom can show students a wide range of futures and help teachers encourage students abilities to choose and assess futures for themselves411-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comDefining the RoleWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?421-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comDescribing the Current State of Classroom Guidance1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRe-AssessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?Do we do this already?If notshould we?441-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comAssess Current StateHow often do counselors see students in classrooms?What kinds of interactions occur?What are the purposes of those interactions?What makes those interactions difficult?Get SMART about goals.Be Specific.Prioritize.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRe-AssessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?Do we do this already?If notshould we?What specific goal should we implement?471-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsSMART48SpecificMeasurableAttainableRelevantTime-bound1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsSpecificExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of planning mini-workshops that Counselors will lead so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsMeasurableExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of planning mini-workshops that Counselors will lead so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsMeasurableExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of one-a-week planning mini-workshops that Counselors will deliver to all 9th Graders so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through by completing a Plan It Out Workbook.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsAttainableExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of one-a-week planning mini-workshops that Counselors will deliver to all 9th Graders so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through by completing a Plan It Out Workbook.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsRelevantExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of one-a-week planning mini-workshops that Counselors will deliver to all 9th Graders so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through by completing a Plan It Out Workbook.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsTime-BoundExample: By next Fall, we will develop and implement a series of one-a-week planning mini-workshops that Counselors will deliver to all 9th Graders so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsTime-BoundExample: This Spring we will develop a series of one-a-week planning mini-workshops that Counselors will deliver at the start of next Fall to all 9th Graders so that students can learn how to make goals, plan a path to them, and follow through by completing a Plan It Out Workbook.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goalsDevelop with your group one SMART goal-styled intervention idea that targets one or more specific Readiness problem that you identified earlier today.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comGet SMART about goals.Self-Assessment.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goals / SWOT AnalysisStrengthswithin usto build onWeaknesseswithin usto overcomeOpportunitiesfrom outsideto exploreThreatsfrom outsideto minimize1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goals / SWOT AnalysisStrengthsTeachers and Counselors work well as a teamWeaknessesTeachers have little time to give to CounselorsOpportunitiesIt will feed into 10th-12th grade life goal exercisesThreatsStudents who miss sessions will fall behind1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goals / SWOT AnalysisStrengthsTeachers and Counselors work well as a team What other projects would synergize with our Strengths & Opportunities?OpportunitiesIt will feed into 10th-12th grade life goal exercises1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goals / SWOT AnalysisWhat must we do to buttress our weaknesses and protect against threats?WeaknessesTeachers have little time to give to CounselorsThreatsStudents who miss sessions will fall behind1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comSMART goals / SWOT AnalysisStrengths WeaknessesOpportunities Threats1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comGet SMART about goals.Build a team.1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRe-assessmentWhat is the role of the guidance counselor?What aspects of students lives can a counselor impact?How can we measure a counselors impact?How can counselors help in the classroom?Do we do this already?If notshould we?What specific goal should we implement?Who do we need on our team? 64RACI AnalysisGoals are made up of tasksFor our initiative to work we mustSelect weekly timesCreate individual lessonsDesign a simple workbook for the students to use throughout the yearCreate a feedback system so counselors can monitor student progressReport to the school1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRACI AnalysisTasks require actors of four typesResponsible DoersAccountable DecidersConsulted Experts and PartnersInformed Need to know-ers1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRACI AnalysisPrincipal Counselor TeacherSelect TimesCreate LessonsDesign WorkbookCreate feedback loopReport1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRACI AnalysisPrincipal Counselor TeacherSelect Times C, I A RCreate Lessons I A, R C, IDesign Workbook I A, R C, ICreate feedback loop C, I A, RReport I A, R C1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comRACI AnalysisA good plan needsPeople accountable to tasksPeople doing the workPartners & Stakeholders ConsultedA team sharing the load1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comA little Reflection1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comReflectionWhat Teachers and Counselors think dramatically impact what students think about themselves and what they ultimately doCounselors who embrace the values of SEL and integrate them into the classroom can directly add value to the K12 outcomes and career futures711-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.comHelp us help you!Got feedback? Questions? Brad Wolfenden(The Princeton Review CO, UT, WY)bradley.Wolfenden@review.comStacey Milgram(The Princeton Review AZ, NM)stacey.milgram@review.com1-800-2-REVIEW www.PrincetonReview.commailto:bradley.Wolfenden@review.commailto:stacey.milgram@review.com

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