CITIZEN-CENTRED SERVICE DELIVERY

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<ol><li> 1. CITIZEN-CENTRED SERVICE DELIVERY- Collaboration among federal, state, and local governments for enhancing citizen and business satisfaction with government services D. BRIAN MARSON APO International Technical Expert Co-Founder and Senior Fellow, Institute for Citizen Centred Service (www,iccs-isac.org) Colombo, June 2015 </li><li> 2. ThematicAreas Service Quality Innovation Leadership E-Government Regulatory Reform Citizen- centered Service Targets Central government Local government Public service agencies Public enterprises Methods Center of Excellence Best practice manual Training Observational study mission Development of NPOs Seminar Workshop Research Study Meeting Adoption of P &amp; Q Tools Results Citizen satisfaction Public trust Cost- effectivenes s Competitive ness Quality of life INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT (Organizational structure &amp; culture, personnel, resources) EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT (Economic, Social, Cultural, Political, Demographic) APO PUBLIC SECTOR PRODUCTIVITY FRAMEWORK </li><li> 3. Presentation Outline 1. Canadas collaborative approach to citizen-centred service improvement across the public sector 2. How the Canadian Public Sector Listens to Citizens 3. How collaboration has achieved Improved Citizen and Business Satisfaction with Government Services 4. How Collaboration has resulted in a Network of One- Stop Services across Canada 5. How Canada is now Collaborating with Other Countries to Create an International Community of Practice devoted to Service Excellence </li><li> 4. Citizen-Centred Service incorporates citizens concerns at every stage of the service design and delivery process; that is, citizens needs become the organizing principle around which the public interest is determined and service delivery is planned. -Deputy Ministers Task Force on Service Delivery Models, Canada Defining Citizen-Centred Service Delivery </li><li> 5. C CITIZEN-CENTERED GOVERNMENT Listening to Citizens, their Needs and their Priorities for Government Action Meeting Citizens Needs through Integrated Government Policy and Integrated Service and Regulation Delivery (One Government-One Public Sector). In order to improve government performance in the eyes of citizens Closing the Gap </li><li> 6. Governments must collaborate if they hope to operate efficiently and effectively . Collaboration is the only strategy that allows todays public sector organizations to reach across jurisdictions to adapt themselves to a fast-changing societal landscape and to significantly improve their ability to deliver services at internet speed. Deloitte - The Future of Collaborative Government, 2008 Deloitte: Integrated Service Delivery is Essential for Efficiency and Effectiveness </li><li> 7. Part One How the Canadian Public Sector Collaborates to Promote Citizen Centred Service </li><li> 8. How the Canadian Public Sector Collaborates to Promote Citizen Centred Service In1997, the Federal, Provincial and Municipal Governments created two Councils to work together to promote integrated, citizen and business-centred service delivery: The Public Sector Service Delivery Council The Public Sector Chief Information Officers Council </li><li> 9. How the Canadian Public Sector Collaborates to Promote Citizen Centred Service The mission of the PSSDC is to be a catalyst for: sharing information; identifying common challenges; initiating research and gaining insight into client needs; developing practical solutions; and, linking up government services wherever possible. The Councils intent is to ensure that Canadian public services are at the forefront of providing excellent, modernized services which result in a customer experience which meets or exceeds citizens and the business communitys expectations. The mission of the PSCIOC is to enable enhanced service to the Canadian public through collaboration across governments and demonstrated leadership in the </li><li> 10. 1.How the Canadian Public Sector Collaborates to Promote Citizen Centred Service In 2002, the two Councils created the Institute for Citizen Centred Service to serve as their joint platform to: Undertake research on citizens and businesses service needs Manage biennial national surveys of citizens and businesses service satisfaction and their priorities for improvement Promote the use of the Common Measurements Tool to measure and benchmark client satisfaction Deliver common training and manage the </li><li> 11. Canadas Public Sector Research, Measurement, Improvement and CS Benchmarking Centre </li><li> 12. Two Decades of Public Sector Collaboration on Service Delivery in Canada Some Results 1. Creation of the inter-governmental PS Service Council and PS Chief Information Officer Councils 2. Creation of the Institute for Citizen Centred Service, co-funded by all levels of Government 3. Completed eleven large National Surveys of Citizens and Businesses co-funded by all levels of Government 4. Creation of a Common Measurements Tool and Benchmarking Centre to measure client satisfaction across the public sector </li><li> 13. Two Decades of Public Sector Collaboration on Service Delivery in Canada Some Results 5. Creation of a network of one-stop services 6. Identification of the drivers of client satisfaction and the documentation of Citizen expectations for service delivery 7. Steadily improved Citizen and Business satisfaction with government services 8. Creation of a Certified Service Managers Program to professionalize service management </li><li> 14. The Institute for Citizen Centred Service in Canada is now a World Centre for Research, Tools and Best Practices in Citizen-Centred Service (www.iccs-isac.org) </li><li> 15. The Institute for Citizen Centred Service Manages Canadas National Surveys of Citizens and Businesses: Measuring Service Satisfaction, Expectations and Priorities for Improvement </li><li> 16. The Canadian Public Sector Measures Customer Satisfaction at a Macro National Level and at a Micro Departmental Level CITIZENS FIRST RESEARCH AND NATIONAL PERFORMANCE TRENDS SERIES ORGANIZATION AND PROGRAM LEVEL: CMT SATISFACTION SURVEYS </li><li> 17. THE COMMON MEASUREMENTS TOOL Measuring Service Satisfaction, Expectations and Priorities for Improvement at the Agency Level, and Providing an International CS Benchmarking Service </li><li> 18. Part Two Understanding citizens and business needs, their expectations and their priorities for improvement </li><li> 19. 19 Understanding the Big Picture (Citizen Level) Citizens First national surveys every two years Taking Care of Business national surveys every two years Annual Canada Internet Panel (13,000 people) National focus groups (e.g. telephone service) Departmental/Program Level (Client Level) The Common Measurements Tool (CMT) Developed by public managers for public managers Housed at the Institute for Citizen Centred Service www.iccs-isac.org The CMT is based on the known drivers of client satisfaction The CMT permits programs to benchmark their results with others Canada: Systematic Listening to Citizens and Business, and Improving Performance </li><li> 20. 20 Listening to Citizens and Business in Canada: Systematic National Surveys (Sponsored and Funded by Government Agencies at all Levels) (sponsored and funded by all levels of government) Available at: www.iccs- isac.org </li><li> 21. WHAT OUR CITIZENS EXPERIENCE 21 Citizens Needs &amp; Expectations Finding the Service Accessing the Service Service Delivery: Citizens Experience with the Service Provider The Outside-In View Over 90% of Citizens expected as good or better service from the public sector than the private sector. Citizens often needed more than one government service especially when dealing with life events such as birth, death, travel, unemployment and migration 40% of Citizens did not know where to start to find the service they needed: -confusing blue or Web pages -services not well advertised, (CF5) Two thirds of Citizens said it was difficult to access the people or information they needed: -busy telephones -voice mail or IVR -not my department - broken links on Web sites (CF5) Citizens are often required to manage the white space between related services (service bundles/clusters) Public services received an average service quality score of 74 out of 100 (CF7) Six factors drive service satisfaction: ease of access, timeliness, knowledge &amp; competence, courtesy/extra mile, fairness and outcome. When all five are performed well, public services score 87 out of 100; when one driver fails the score drops to 74/100, when four fail 37/100 (CF3) Timeliness is most important driver across all services &amp; the telephone channel remains their priority for improvement.*Canadian research </li><li> 22. How Businesses Experience Public Services Business Needs &amp; Expectations Finding the Service Accessing the Service Service Delivery: Businesses Experience with Government Services Their Outside-In View 87% of businesses agree good service from government is essential to a healthy business climate TCOB2 research demonstrates empirical link good service increases confidence in public institutions Two-thirds of business clients reported access problems each access problem causes a substantial drop in satisfaction e.g. getting bounced from one person to another and lack of response to telephone messages each reduce satisfaction levels by 25 out of 100 points Telephone is the most used channel 62% of clients used it at some point during their recent experience Two-thirds of service experiences are multi-channel business clients report using 2.1 channels per service The drivers of satisfaction are the same as for citizens. The overall service quality trend is upward the average rating across all services to business in Canada is currently about 70 out of 100, and rising. </li><li> 23. 23 23 Canadian Research Findings: The Key Drivers of Public Sector Service Satisfaction* These satisfaction drivers and their relative importance are consistent with those found in the biennial Citizens First Studies Knowledge &amp; Competence Fairness Courtesy &amp; Extra Mile Outcome Timeliness Citizens First 4 CLIENT SATISFACTION ICCS- ISAC 2005 * Drivers vary by type and strength with the business line and channel Ease of Access </li><li> 24. Performance on the Five Drivers Determines Overall Client Satisfaction </li><li> 25. 72 69 64 55 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 1 2 3 4 5 How are we doing on the drivers? Outcome Fairness Knowledge/ competence Courtesy/ extra mile Timeliness Source: Citizens First 3, 2003 72 69 64 55 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 1 2 3 4 5 72 69 64 55 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 1 2 3 4 5 How are we doing on the drivers? Outcome Fairness Knowledge/ competence Courtesy/ extra mile Timeliness Source: Citizens First 3, 2003 Which Drivers Most Need Improvement? * * Canadian research data- will vary by department and country </li><li> 26. 26 Service Standards: Identifying Citizens Expectations Telephone In-Person Email 2 1 30 14 42 39 20 35 5 10 1 1 0 25 50 75 1 2-4 5-9 10-14 15-29 30-60 &gt;60 Percent of respondents 1998 2002 Number ofminutes 30 10 5 44 40 29 24 43 52 2 6 12 1 2 0 25 50 75 4 hr Sameday Next business day 2 days 3 days + Percent of respondents 1998 2000 2002 6 10 20 32 17 7 3 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 10 sec 20 sec 30 sec 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min 5 min Percent of respondents </li><li> 27. Listening to Clients and Improving Service Satisfaction in Canada: The Common Measurements Tool, &amp; Service Improvement Guide 27 The CMT is used across the entire Canadian Public Sector and under license in New Zealand, Australia, Singapore, Qatar and several other countries </li><li> 28. The Four-Step Service Improvement Process </li><li> 29. Canada has taken a Results-based Approach to Service Improvement, Based on Research and Measurement </li><li> 30. Canadian Public Sector: Using the Drivers to Achieve Continuous Improvement in Service Satisfaction -term trend for 26 services 72 73 67 6464 50 60 70 80 1998 2000 2003 2005 2008 Average service quality rating (0-100) Year 2014 74 Source: ICCS CF5 &amp; CF6 Average Citizen Satisfaction Score for 21 Government Services </li><li> 31. Improving Business Sector Satisfaction with Government Services in Canada </li><li> 32. Results Improvement for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Improving Royal Canadian Mounted Police Performance on the Drivers 81-84% Overall Citizen Satisfaction The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Surveys over 7,000 Citizens Annually Using the Common Measurements Tool Survey Tool, and Uses the Results to Improve Service </li><li> 33. Some Canadian Best Practice Results (Institute for Citizen Centred Service, Toronto, Benchmarking Service (www.iccs-isac.org) </li><li> 34. 34 Citizen Centered Service: Outperforming the Private Sector --7174Supermarkets 7057--Canada Post 74647066Average rating across services shown --6457Taxis 6858--Used municipal public transit (bus, streetcar, subway) --7468Private mail carriers and courier companies 8477--Visited a public library CF4CF1CF4CF1 GovernmentPrivate Mean Service Quality Score (0-100) Services How do public and private services compare? Citizens First 1 and 4 --7174Supermarkets 7057--Canada Post 74647066Average rating across services shown --6457Taxis 6858--Used municipal public transit (bus, streetcar, subway) --7468Private mail carriers and courier companies 8477--Visited a public library CF4CF1CF4CF1 GovernmentPrivate Mean Service Quality Score (0-100) Services How do public and private services compare? Citizens First 1 and 4 Many public sector services outperform mainstream private sector services in the eyes of Canadians (Citizens First-4 Survey, 2006) </li><li> 35. The Citizen-centred Service Agenda is now being linked to the Broader Public Management Agenda </li><li> 36. Staff Satisfaction, Service Satisfaction, and Trust in Public Organizations are Linked The Public Sector Service Value Chain concept proposes that these three aspects of public management are linked: LINK ONE: Engaged employees provide better service, and in the other direction good service to clients results in proud and engaged employees LINK TWO: Excellent service is one important factor (along with good management) that helps build trust and confidence in public institutions PEOPLE SERVICE TRUST </li><li> 37. Excellent Service and Good Management Drives Citizen Trust and Confidence in Public Organizations CONFIDENCE In the Public Service Excellent service and good management contribute to confidence in the public service Excellent service Benefits to citizens Equal &amp; ethical treatment Good leadership &amp; management Citizens First 4 ICCS-ISAC 2005 </li><li> 38. Peel Region (Toronto): Service Value Chain Measurement (average score out of 10) Employee Engagement 7.0 Client Satisfaction 8.0 Citizen Trust &amp; Confidence 7.0 Clear and promising direction Respectful treatment &amp; recognition Learning and growth Work and performance demands Immediate supervisors Value to customers Confidence in leadership Pay and benefits Colleagues Timeliness Service outcome (client got what they needed) Staff made a real effort gave clear and accurate information Proces...</li></ol>