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©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th edition Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research `

Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

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Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

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Page 1: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Chapter 5

Marketing Information

Systems and Marketing Research

`

Page 2: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Chapter Objectives• Explain the concept of the marketing

information system

• Identify the different kinds of information the company might use

• Outline the marketing research process

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 3: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing Information System

A Marketing Information System (MIS) consists of people, equipment, and

procedures to gather, sort, analyze, evaluate, and distribute needed, timely, and accurate information to marketing decision makers

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 4: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing Information System

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 5: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Assessing Information Needs

• There must be a balance between what information is wanted and what is cost effective, obtainable and needed

• Too much information can be as harmful as too little

• Information gathering costs can add up quickly

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 6: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Developing Information• Information can be obtained from internal

company records, marketing intelligence and marketing research

• Data warehouses contain all customer information in a single, accessible source

• Guest history information the most valuable

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 7: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Guest Information Trends

• Booking patterns

• Cancellations

• Conversion percentages

• Overbooking patterns

• Historical occupancy trends

• Yield pattern by season

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 8: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Guest Information Management

• Guest comment cards• Listening to and speaking with guests• Automated systems• Mystery shoppers• Company records• Point-of-sale information• Corporate customer and marketing

intermediary information©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 9: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing IntelligenceMarketing intelligence includes everyday

information about developments in the marketing environment that helps

managers prepare and adjust marketing plans and short-run tactics

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 10: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing Intelligence Forms

• Internal marketing intelligence

• External marketing intelligence

• Competitive information

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 11: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Internal Marketing Intelligence

• Company executives

• Hotel owners and managers

• Contact personnel

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 12: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

External Marketing Intelligence

• Macro market information

• Competitive information

• New innovation and trends

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 13: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Competitive Information• Competitors annual reports

• Trade magazines, press releases, advertisements

• In today’s information age, companies leave a paper trail

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 14: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing Research

Marketing research is a process that identifies and defines marketing opportunities and

problems, monitors and evaluates marketing actions and performance, and communicates the findings and implications to management

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 15: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Marketing Research Process1. Define the problem and research

objectives

2. Develop the research plan

3. Implement the research plan

4. Interpret and report the findings

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 16: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Defining the Problem and Research Objectives

• Exploratory research – gather preliminary information to help define the problem and suggest hypotheses

• Descriptive research – describe the size and composition of the market

• Causal research – tests hypotheses about cause and effect relationships

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 17: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Developing the Research Plan• Determining Specific Information Needs – translate

research objectives into specific information needs

• Gathering Secondary Information –collect information that is already in existence

• Planning Primary Data Collection – information being collected for the specific purpose at hand

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 18: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Research Approaches

• Observational research

• Survey research

• Experimental research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 19: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Contact Methods in Research• Mail• Telephone• Personal Interview

– Individual (intercept) interview– In-depth interview

• Internet surveying– Electronic mail– Web page

• Focus groups

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 20: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Sampling Plan• A sample is a segment of the population selected

to represent the population as a whole• To design a sample four decisions must be made:

– Who will be surveyed?– How many people will be surveyed?– How will the sample be chosen?

• Probability or nonprobability samples– When will the survey be given?

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 21: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Research Instruments• Primary research instruments

– The interview • structured e.g questionnaires• unstructured

– Mechanical devices– Structured models eg. test markets

• What are some types of closed-ended and open-ended questions?

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 22: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Information Analysis

• Analysis of collected information can assist in distinguishing relationships between data

• Help managers answer questions like “what if” and “which is best”

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 23: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Distributing Information• Information is not helpful unless it is able to

reach the managers clearly and in a timely manner

• Recent developments in information handling have led to a revolution in its distribution

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

Page 24: Chapter 5 Marketing Information Systems and Marketing Research

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens

International Marketing Research

• Many barriers exist that can make international research more difficult:– Lack of secondary information– Language– Culture

©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, 4th editionUpper Saddle River, NJ 07458 Kotler, Bowen, and Makens