Beyond These 4 Walls Final

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Going beyond these four walls

Going beyond these four wallsIdeas for outdoor learning

Alan ParkinsonGeography Dept.

Man is most nearly himself when he achieves the seriousness of a child at play.Herodotus, Greek historian

Field Studies Council ResearchSubstantial evidence exists to indicate thatfieldwork, properly conceived, adequately planned,well taught and effectively followed up, offerslearners opportunities to develop their knowledgeand skills in ways that add value to their everydayexperiences in the classroom.Specifically, fieldwork can have a positive impact onlong-term memory due to the memorable nature of thefieldwork setting. Effective fieldwork, and residentialexperience in particular, can lead to individual growthand improvements in social skills. More importantly,there can be reinforcement between the affective andthe cognitive, with each influencing the other andproviding a bridge to higher order learning.

#kebeyond4walls78% of parents are concerned that children dont spend enough time interacting with nature57% of parents say their children spend a little or a lot less time outdoors than they didWildlife Trust Research

We will be physically, mentally and spiritually impoverished if our children are deprived of contact with the natural world.A: Sue FreestoneB: David AttenboroughC: Steve Backshall

We will be physically, mentally and spiritually impoverished if our children are deprived of contact with the natural world.A: Sue FreestoneB: David AttenboroughC: Steve Backshall

Previous experience of working in and writing about the outdoors

Winner Hay Festival / National Trust Outdoor Book of the Year 2012Runner up Education Writer of the Year twiceShortlisted for Learning outside the Classroom Award 2013

Living Geographyhttp://livinggeography.blogspot.com

RiskMinimised in the classroomCheck out the work of West Rise Primary Schoolhttps://www.channel4.com/news/buffalo-shotguns-and-quad-bikes-at-school

Lets get outside

Elements of the outdoors

Prepare in the classroomGo outsideExploreThink and discussReturn to the classroom

Elements of the outdoors

Preparation and activities

Stephen Pickering

In an English school, teachers can teach their children anything at all as long as it is legal and safe..Mick Waters

Going your own way

15 + 45 + 15

Colour colour spectrum cardsDouble sided tape Colour charts from B&Q

App: Freeze Paint

Poetry

Write a poem

Wordfoto App

Shape hunter

Look up

Sound CDs

Use an App?

Crafty ExplorersDesign Council project I was involved in for funding

StoryMap use your smartphone to add something to the map it will be geolocated and addedhttp://arcg.is/2nH837P

#kebeyond4walls

8-Way Thinking

Drive

Sharon Witt, University of WinchesterWays of Walking

Uncertain and emergent journeys across places taking the opportunity to pause and dwell in places for more than a fleeting moment (Payne and Wattchow, 2009, p.16).

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AB

HERE BE DRAGONS

!!

Wilderness walks

UNCHARTED TERRITORY

Unplanned pathsTime to stop & stareImagining spotsIdeasConversations & chatsRiskWonderEmotional encounters

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Accident Black SpotCheckpointSuperhighwayJamTimed Tasks

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Paula Owens

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Placea meaningful segment of geographical space

Comfort Zone

Pedagogy:

leading students to a place where they can learn

Your challengeSelect an activityAdd a subject contextCreate a curriculum artefact

curriculum artefacts

What is curriculum making ?

the creation of interesting, engaging and challenging educational experiences which draw upon teacher knowledge and skills, the experiences of students and the subject resource..

The use of curriculum artefacts is important when planning lessons. You may have returned from the Easter break with a range of new items which could be used in a lesson. These could include:

ClothingStones or sand from a beachMapsLeaflets and other ephemera including ticketsImagesSound clipsVideo materialSouvenirs that you have boughtMemories

By themselves these remain simply things but in the hands of a teacher they come to life. This happens for three reasons, which are to do with the skill of the teacher, as described by Professor David Lambert.

First, using this resource requires specialist subject knowledge to realise the educational benefits of using it. Secondly, it requires the teacher to decide on a sound way to use the resource. Thirdly, it requires the teacher to able to 'place' the resource really effectively - thinking about what prior knowledge would be helpful and how to follow it through and build on the understanding gained through its use.

Choose your activitiesMission:ExploreCloud-spottingGo for a walkColour paletteWrite a poemMake a mapRecord soundsCapture the place8-way thinkingCapture texturesBe a pigeonMini-National ParkShape hunterHaiku5-7-5Interview someone??

Your challengeSelect an activityAdd a subject contextCreate a curriculum artefact

Be back here in 45 minutes please and be ready to share#kebeyond4walls

Feedback / forwardWhat did you learn about the place(s) that you visited?How could you use the outdoors in your own subject area?What ONE thing are you going to try during the summer term?

#kebeyond4walls

ReferencesFSC Research Report (2004)https://www.field-studies-council.org/media/268859/2004_a_review_of_research_on_outdoor_learning.pdfStephen Pickering: Teaching Outdoors Creatively: Learning to teach in the Primary School Routledge (April 2017) next weekSharon WittDr. Paula Owens

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ReferencesSound mapping: http://www.rgs.org/OurWork/Schools/Fieldwork+and+local+learning/Fieldwork+techniques/Fieldwork+technology/Soundscapes.htm Keri Smith: How to be an Explorer of the World

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