Being an instructional leader

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This workshop deals with instructional leadership using the Sergiovanni model and looks at how the instructional leader can transform a school culture from a culture of teaching to a culture of learning using PLCs.

Text of Being an instructional leader

  • 1.Keith Pruitt, Ed. S. Words of Wisdom Educational Consulting www.woweducationalconsulting.com Join us onfacebook

2. No stream rises higher than its source.Whatever man might build could never express or reflect more than who he was. --Frank Lloyd Wright FromStaff Development: Practices that Promote Leadership in Learning Communities , Sally Zepeda (1999) 3. Youll grow up and go to school 4.

  • Within a school, the leadership acts to build school instructional capacity
  • Insure instructional quality
  • Promote student engagement

These are the primary roles served by the administration of a school.But who fills that void if the administration of a school is unfamiliar with curriculum and instruction? 5.

  • Facility Supervisor
  • Discipline
  • Report writer
  • Community Relations
  • Human Resources
  • Inspector
  • Troubleshooter

6. Question for Consideration: How much impact does the supervisors management style and assumptions about people have on the overall success of the school?Please explain. 7.

  • Theory X
  • People Work as Little As Possible
  • People lack ambition, dislike responsibility, prefer to be led
  • People are self-centered and indifferent to the needs of organization
  • People are naturally resistant to change
  • People are gullible of fads and are easily misled
  • Douglas McGregor, The Human Side of Enterprise,Leadership and Motivation,eds Warren G. Bennis and Edgar H. Schein, Cambridge: MIT Press, 1966.
  • Theory Y
  • A Leader is responsible to organize in the interest of educational ends
  • People are not naturally passive about organizational needs but become so in floundering organizations.
  • It is the responsibility of leadership to provide the avenues of growth desired by educators.
  • The goal of leadership is to provide a professional learning environment conducive to their own growing.

8. Sergiovanni, T. J.and Starratt, R. J. (2002)Supervision: A Redefinition . Boston: McGraw Hill. 9.

  • In-Service
  • Professional Development
  • Renewal

10.

  • Assumes teaching is a job.
  • Focuses on development of job-related skills or tasks.
  • Through training and practice.
  • Looked upon as the schools responsibility

Examples: new text adoption, computer software, data program 11. Now class I want you to just listen to me and I am going to tell you how to catch fish. You could train in this fashion, but it isnt the most effective method. 12.

  • Assumes Teaching is a profession
  • Focuses on development of professional expertise.
  • The child is the end result.
  • Through problem solving and inquiry.
  • Is done through a collaboration of leadership and the teacher.

13. Let me show you how I fish, then we will work on it together. 14.

  • Assumes Teaching is a vocation
  • Focuses on development of personal and professional self
  • Instruction asks for reflection and reevaluation
  • In renewal, the teacher is responsible for growth, the leadership just provides the means
  • Done through collaboration

15. Turn and Talk: How does looking at teaching as a vocation change professional development to renewal? Francis S. Bolin (1987).Reassessment and Renewal in Teaching .Teacher Renewal Professional Issues, Personal Choices . Bolin and Falk, eds. New York: Teachers College Press, p.11 16.

  • Offer meaningful intellectual, social and emotional engagement with ideas, materials and colleagues.
  • Take account of the context and teacher experiences.
  • Offer support for informed dissent to evaluate alternatives and to scrutinize underlying assumptions.
  • Create a school culture that honors diversity of culture and ideas
  • Build capacity in teachers

Judith Warren Little, Teacher Professional Development in a Climate of Educational Reform,Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis , vol. 15, no 2 (1993), p.129-159. 17. Dennis Sparks and Stephanie Hirch, Strengthening Professional Development A National Study,Education Week , May 24, 2000, p. 45. 18. 19. Professional Learning Communities Moving from a Culture of teaching to a Culture of learning 20.

  • What do we want each student to learn?
  • How will we know when each student has learned it?
  • How will we respond when a student experiences difficulty in learning?

On Common Ground, DuFour, p. 33 21.

  • School Culture Inventory ( Patterson, et al)
  • Build a professional library in your school.
  • Change Your expectations of:
    • Yourself as an instructional leader
    • Teachers as being more than just professionals
    • Outcomes
  • Focus training on method not material
  • Connect with classrooms

22.

    • School Culture Inventory: Identifying Guiding Beliefs
    • ( always, most of the time, part of the time, never)
    • School Purposes
    • To what extent does the school:
    • 1.Communicate a set of purposes
    • that provide a sense of direction and
    • a basis for evaluating? A M P N
    • 2.Value the importance of teachers
    • and students understand the purposes? A M P N
    • 3.Want decisions to be made that
    • reflect purposes? A M P N
    • Empowerment
    • To what extent does the school:
    • 4.Value empowering teachers to
    • make decisions that are sensible given
    • circumstances they face?A M P N
    • Patterson, Purkey and Parker, Guiding Beliefs of Our School District, Productive School Systems for a Nonrational World, Arlington: ASCD. 1986, p.50-51.

23. Taken from On Common Ground (2005).Masters of Motivation , Jonathon Saphier, p. 97. 24.

  • School Culture Inventory ( Patterson, et al)
  • Build a professional library in your school.
  • Change Your expectations of:
  • Yourself as an instructional leader
  • Teachers as being more than just professionals
  • Outcomes
  • Focus training on method not material
  • Connect with classrooms

25.

  • Books by researchers like Isabel Beck, Bob Marzano, Linda Hoyt, Lucy Calkin, Janet Allen, Fountas and Pinnell, Howard Gardner, Sergiovanni, Donald Graves, and many others.
  • Theoretical research by Vygotsky, Pearson, Gallagher, Moody, Maslow, Eichhorn, Piaget, Anderson, and others.
  • Journals such asReading Teacher, Reading Today, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Reading Research Quarterly, Educational Leadership, Early Childhood News, Journal of Staff Development,etc.
  • Local resources like internet connection, local newspapers, contacts in the community
  • List of websites for virtual tours (WOW website)
  • Information about interesting places
  • The clippings file
  • Reference books

26.

  • School Culture Inventory ( Patterson, et al)
  • Build a professional library in your school.
  • Change Your expectations of:
  • Yourself as an instructional leader
  • Teachers as being more than just professionals
  • Outcomes
  • Focus training on method not material
  • Connect with classrooms

27.

  • Of Instructional Leaders
  • To provide a culture of learning for students and teachers
  • To provide opportunities for growth
  • To evaluate the progress of all
  • Of Teachers
  • To give students 100% of themselves
  • To use best practices
  • To pursue professional growth
  • Collaborate with others
  • To Monitor progress
  • Provide interventions

28.

  • All Students to Do Their Best
  • Students to be life-long learners
  • All students learning together
  • Mastery of skills

29.

  • I believe that all of my students have the intellectual ability to do rigorous work and meet high standards.Unfortunately, not all of my students share this belief.It is my job to help them come to believe this, along with the conviction that it would be worth their while to do well in school.Therefore, in our minute-to-minute interactions, I communicate to students in every way I can the messages: