Annual Review of Cultural Heritage Informatics

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The Annual Review of Cultural Heritage Informatics (ARCHI) is a pivotal resource for cultural heritage scholars, professionals and students providing a compendium of current research, educational initiatives and best practices. Featuring sixteen original works selected by the distinguished editorial board of international scholars, ARCHI presents a broad spectrum of the cultural heritage informatics field. Whether you are interested in cultural heritage preservation, digitization, digital humanities, user behaviour, technology or educational practices, this edited collection is the central source for current and emerging trends in the rapidly expanding cultural heritage informatics field. The major sections include Best Practices: contributors explore the increasingly converging, distributed and pluralistic nature of digital cultural heritage and suggest new perspectives on traditional preservation and access methodologies Digital Communities: authors emphasize the role of cultural maps in interpreting digital representations and advocate for the preservation of digital cultural discourse; Education: offerings include an exploration of a current cultural heritage informatics educational program and an analysis of educational resources available to local history and genealogy collection librarians Field Reports: case studies include active digitization programs, cultural heritage preservation initiatives and developing cultural heritage research agendas in Ethiopia, Pennsylvania (USA), Australia and Romania Technology: chapters explore specific uses of technology for promoting the accessibility and preservation of cultural heritage ranging from a digital humanities virtual reality application, to folksonomies and other social networking tools as finding aid extensions, and a review of digital collection user studies Reviews: this new section is introduced and the vision charted for its expansion in future volumes. Readership ARCHI is the polestar publication for cultural heritage informatics scholars, practitioners, and students. By challenging readers to explore a variety of contexts and offering critical evaluation of conventional practices, ARCHI promotes new ideas and offers new pathways of development for the cultural heritage informatics field. June 2014; 316pp; hardback; 978-1-78330-026-6; £59.95

Text of Annual Review of Cultural Heritage Informatics

  • ANNUAL REVIEW OF CULTURAL HERITAGE INFORMATICS
  • What is it? A compendium of current research, educational initiatives and best practices in the cultural heritage informatics field.
  • Who is it for? Cultural heritage scholars, professionals and students who are interested in cultural heritage preservation, digitization, digital humanities, user behaviour, technology or educational practices.
  • Key sections 1. Best Practices: explores the increasingly converging, distributed & pluralistic nature of digital cultural heritage & suggests new perspectives on traditional preservation & access methodologies.
  • Key sections 2. Digital Communities: emphasizes the role of cultural maps in interpreting digital representations and advocates for the preservation of digital cultural discourse.
  • Key sections 3. Education: an exploration of a current cultural heritage informatics educational programme & an analysis of educational resources available to local history & genealogy collections librarians
  • Key sections 4. Field Reports: case studies include active digitization programmes, cultural heritage preservation initiatives and developing cultural heritage research agendas in Ethiopia, USA, Australia and Romania.
  • Key sections 5. Technology: explores uses of technology for promoting the accessibility and preservation of cultural heritage including a digital humanities virtual reality application and folksonomies.
  • Key sections 6. Review: a wide-ranging examination of the themes and concepts featured in conferences, seminars, workshops, books and blogs over the past year.
  • Who is it edited by? The book is edited by Dr Samantha Kelly Hastings, director and professor at the University of Southern Carolina School of Library and Information Science.
  • Who contributed to it? Michele V Cloonan, Simmons College Martha Mahard, Simmons College Daniel Gelaw Alemneh, University of North Texas Abede Rorissa, University at Albany, SUNY Jeanette A Bastian, Simmons College Ross Harvey, Simmons College Hemalata Iyer, University at Albany Amber J DAmbrosio, Dixie State University Jennifer Burek Pierce, The University of Iowa Mary W Elings, The Catholic University of America
  • Who contributed to it? Youngok Choi, The Catholic University of America Jane Zhang, The Catholic University of America Rhonda L Clark, Clarion University of Pennsylvania James T Maccaferi, Clarion University of Pennsylvania Abede Rorissa, University at Albany, SUNY Teklemichael T Wordofa, Addis Ababa University Solomon Teferra, Addis Ababa University Alan C Jalowitz, Pennsylvania Center for the Book Steven L Herb, Pennsylvania Center for the Book
  • Who contributed to it? Sigrid McCausland, Charles Sturt University Kim M Thompson, Charles Sturt University Cheryl Klimaszewski, Rutgers University James M Nyce, Ball State University Heidi Rae Cooley, University of South Carolina Duncan A Buell, University of South Carolina Walter Forsberg, New York University Erik Piil, DuArt Film and Video Sheila OHare, Emporia State University Ashley Todd-Diaz, Emporia State University
  • WHAT TO EXPECT chapter by chapter
  • PART I Best Practices
  • 1. Digital Preservation: Whose Responsibility? Michele V Cloonan & Martha Mahard This chapter suggests that the preservation of digital cultural heritage is inherently pluralistic and digital preservation activities are becoming increasingly distributed, decentralized, and ad hoc while incorporating new forms of social networking. Thus, traditional models of preservation programmes, which depend on extant institutional structures, may no longer be effective. The reasons for this shift are explored and new preservation perspectives are suggested.
  • 2. Facilitating Discovery and Use of Digital Cultural Heritage Resources with Folksonomies Daniel Gelaw Alemneh & Abede Rorissa The current landscape in the use of folksonomies by cultural heritage institutions is reviewed and emerging trends in this area identified. Strengths and limitations of folksonomies vis-a-vis traditional indexing and taxonomies are explored with a particular emphasis on the history of cultural heritage information retrieval, including a consideration of the potential benefits and controversies surrounding user-supplied tags or keywords.
  • 3. Experiments in Cultural Heritage Informatics Jeannette A Bastian and Ross Harvey This chapter concerns research on the convergence of cultural heritage institutions conducted by faculty at Simmons College with a focus on the Simmons Digital Curriculum Laboratory, the digital convergence projects negotiated & completed by faculty & students, & the lessons learned. The problems encountered are outlined, including concerns about controlling public access, communication difficulties & lack of technical skills. Finally, the trajectory for convergence is evaluated.
  • PART II Digital Communities
  • 4. Web Representation and Interpretation of Culture Hemalata Iyer and Amber J DAmbrosio Ayuverda, a holistic healing system deeply rooted in its indigenous culture, is being practiced within a different cultural milieu in the US. The healing system has undergone a cultural shift away from its religious origins on US websites, and the transplanted cultural context impacts the meaning and interpretations drawn from its digital representations. Utlilizing Stuart Halls approach to representation in the media as a framework, representations of Ayurveda in a...
  • ...sample of US websites are analyzed. The significance and methods used to legitimize Ayurveda, the cultural symbols employed the philosophy and purpose of the websites, and the viewers perception of the representations are examined. The authors explore whether representations translated on both symbolic and linguistic levels may surmount the problems and issues arising from varying cultural maps.
  • 5. Knitting as Cultural Heritage Jennifer Burek Pierce As social media facilitate intense interactions between knitting writers & knitting readers, knitting forms a significant element of cultural heritage, with social, technological, & economic effects, making it a phenomenon that merits recognition as an enduring aspect of cultural heritage. This chapter employs Chartiers historical & discursive analysis to explore three prominent knitting blogs & their cultural discourse revealing a cultural heritage meriting & awaiting digital preservation.
  • PART III Education
  • 6. Developing 21st Century Cultural Heritage Information Professionals for Digital Stewardship Younok Choi, Mary W Elings and Jane Zhang The Cultural Heritage Information Management concentration at the Catholic University of America prepares information professionals to develop & curate sustainable digital collections. This chapter describes the programme that supports the development of five core competencies; contextual foundations, resource management & digital curation, information organization, information service provisions, & digital technology.
  • 7. Local History and Genealogy Collections in Libraries Roland L Clark and James T Maccaferri This chapter considers whether the LIS field provides adequate education and resources to support professionals embracing local collection management within the scope of their duties. It discusses the challenges identifying libraries holding local history and genealogy collections, surveys existing instructional support for professionals managing local collections and reviews relevant periodical literature since 2000. Suggestions for new directions in research, education and collaboration are offered.
  • PART IV Field Reports
  • 8. Initiatives in Digitization and Digital Preservation of Cultural Heritage in Ethiopia Abede Rorissa, Teklelmichael T Wordofa & Solomon Teferra This chapter discusses the results of the first comprehensive study of digitizations and digital preservation of cultural heritage initiatives in Ethiopia. The authors offer recommendations on the path forward so that cultural heritage institutions in Ethiopia might achieve the ultimate goal of digital preservation as well as serving their users effectively and efficiently.