Your Part of the Gift - Lifebanc | Donate Life Organ Donor Brain Death Organ Donor Donation After Cardiac Death (DCD) Tissue Donor Cardiac Death Irreversible, nonsurvivable brain

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  • Your Part of the GiftA Guide for Funeral Directors

    and Embalmers

  • LifeBanc Mission Statement

    To increase organ and tissue donation for those awaiting transplant.

    To provide community and professional education to people of all ages about theneed for and the benefits of organ and tissue donation.

    To respect and support those individuals and families whose generosity andcompassion make it possible to improve and save the lives of others.

  • Introduction

    There are approximately 0 ,000 patients on the UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing)waiting list who need an organ transplant. A new name is added to the list nearly every 13 minutes. Across the United States, at least 18 people die each day due to the shortage of donatedorgans. Tissue transplants can greatly enhance a persons life by restoring the gift of sight or mobility. More than 500,000 people can benefit each year from tissue donation. Increased education among health care professionals and the public is the key to solving the donor shortage.

    LifeBanc recognizes the integral role the funeral profession plays in the donation process. It is ourdesire to increase awareness of how the donation process affects the funeral home and the donor familys choice of memorialization. This reference guide, created just for you, explains the donation process, addresses concerns about donation and provides information on how donorfamilies can honor their loved one.

    LifeBanc is a resource for education and is staffed by people who understand your concerns. Your feedback is necessary in implementing any changes that will enable us to betterserve you and your funeral home, as well as the families we share.

    LifeBanc embraces the funeral home staff as one of the essential supports to our donor families. The positive attitude you convey about donation will impact how a family feels abouttheir decision to donate. Through education and communication, LifeBanc and funeral homescan unite in the common goal of serving our communities.

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    1 5There are approximately 105,000 patients on the UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing)waiting list who need an organ transplant. A new name is added to the list nearly every 13minutes. Across the United States, at least 18 people die each day due to the shortage of donatedorgans. Tissue transplants can greatly enhance a persons life by restoring the gift of sight ormobility. More than 500,000 people can benefit each year from tissue donation. Increasededucation among health care professionals and the public is the key to solving the donorshortage.

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  • About LifeBanc

    For more than 15 years, LifeBanc has served as the federally designated, nonprofit organ procurement organization (OPO) for Northeast Ohio. It is the successor of the Committee onDonor Enlistment (CODE), one of the original, seven independent OPOs in the United States.Later known as Organ Recovery, Inc., the agency became LifeBanc in 1986. LifeBancs staff isresponsible for all aspects of the organ and tissue donation process, public and professional education programs, and bereavement services for donor families.

    LifeBanc serves a population of 4.3 million people and works with more than 80 hospitalsthroughout the following counties: Ashland, Ashtabula, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Erie,Geauga, Harrison, Holmes, Huron, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit,Trumbull, Tuscarawas and Wayne. LifeBanc is a member of the United Network for OrganSharing (UNOS), the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations (AOPO) and theAmerican Association of Tissue Banks (AATB).

    Along with serving the public, professional community and donor hospitals, LifeBanc providesorgans to three transplanting centers: The Cleveland Clinic Transplant Center; Summa HealthSystem-Akron City Hospital Renal Transplant Center; and University Hospitals of Cleveland. In2001, LifeBanc consolidated with Mid-America Tissue Center to form LifeBanc Tissue Services,enabling it to ensure the highest quality standards in the recovery of tissue, such as bone, heartvalves and ligaments, for use in transplantation. The Tissue Services staff is responsible for tissuerecovery, quality assurance and compliance with federal regulations.

    LifeBanc has a central office in Cleveland, as well as satellite locations at the Cuyahoga CountyCoroners Office; LifeBanc Tissue Services in Massillon, Ohio; MetroHealth Medical Center; St.Elizabeth Health Center; Summa Health System-Akron City Hospital; and University Hospitalsof Cleveland.

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    For nearly 25 years, LifeBanc has served as the federally designated, nonprofit organ procurement organization (OPO) for Northeast Ohio. It is the successor of the Committee on Donor Enlistment (CODE), one of the original, seven independent OPSs in the United States.Later known as Organ Recovery, Inc., the agency became LifeBanc in 1986. LifeBancs staff is responsible for all aspects of the organ and tissue donation process, public and professional education programs, and bereavement services for donor families.

    Along with serving the public, professional community and donor hospitals, LifeBanc providesorgans to two transplanting centers: The Cleveland Clinic Transplant Center and University Hospitals Case Medical Center. In 2001, LifeBanc Tissue Services was formed, enabling it to ensure the highest quality standards in the recovery tissue, such as bone, heart valves and ligaments, for use in transplantation. The Tissue Servies staff is responsible for tissue recovery, quality assurance and compliance with federal regulations.

    LifeBanc has a central office in Cleveland, as well as satellite locations at the Cuyahoga County Coroners Office.

    112802 REVISED PGS.indd 2 5/13/10 10:47 AM

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    Organ Donor

    Brain Death

    Organ Donor

    Donation After Cardiac Death(DCD)

    Tissue Donor

    Cardiac Death

    Irreversible, nonsurvivablebrain injury.

    Patient currently maintainedon a ventilator.

    Tests performed to confirm noblood flow to brain/brain stem(e.g. EEG, cerebral blood flow,clinical exam).

    Patient has an indication ofdonor status (first-person consent) or legal next of kinprovides authorization/consent.

    Organ donors may also donateeyes and tissue.

    Irreversible, nonsurvivablebrain injury.

    Patient currently maintainedon a ventilator.

    Patient has not progressed tobrain death.

    Family decides to take patientoff ventilator.

    Family wants donation tooccur.

    Patient may have an indicationof donor status. Per Ohio law,first-person consent does notapply to DCD cases. Legal next of kin provides authorization/consent.

    Organ donors may also donateeyes and tissue.

    Patient may or may not havesustained a brain injury.

    Patient is not currently on a ventilator.

    No cardiac or respiratory activity.

    Patient has an indication ofdonor status (first-person consent) or legal next of kinprovides authorization/consent.

    May donate eyes and tissuesuch as bone, connective tissue(ligaments and tendons), heartvalves and veins/vessels.

    Organ and Tissue Donation

    Organ donors are individuals who suffer irreversible and catastrophic brain injury resulting in death. To sustain cardiovascular function, they are maintained on a ventilator and clinically managed with appropriate fluids and medications until the organs are recovered andlater transplanted. Transplantable organs include: heart, kidneys, liver, lung, pancreas and smallintestine.

    Tissue donations are most commonly obtained from a person who has already been declared cardiac dead or from an organ donor after removal of transplantable organs. Transplantable tissueincludes: bone (e.g., femur, fibula, humerus, ilium, radius, tibia and ulna), cartilage, connectivetissue (ligaments and tendons), corneas (eyes), heart valves, skin and veins/vessels. Tissue is recovered within 24 hours after death if the donors body has been refrigerated.

  • Routine Notification

    Recognizing that the organ and tissue shortage is a growing national health care crisis, the federal government issued strong regulations in June 1998 to help save and improve more lives through organ and tissue donation. Under the federal regulations, hospitals must notifyLifeBanc of:

    1) every cardiac death or brain death; 2) every imminent death due to a severe brain injury; or3) every patient who the doctor has already declared brain dead.

    It is LifeBancs responsibility to determine, through a stringent medical/social history, if a patient meets the requirements for organ and tissue donation. In addition, only a LifeBanc staff member or a formally trained requestor may offer families the option of donation.

    Here are some things to remember:

    LifeBanc must be notified of every death that occurs in a hospital.

    LifeBanc must be notified in a timely manner of all patients who are brain dead,as well as those who are severely brain injured and ventilator dependent.

    It is the responsibility of LifeBanc to screen all potential donor referralsfor medical suitability.

    Families of potential eye and tissue donors will be approached for consent only by a LifeBanc donor referral coordinator. Only a member of LifeBancs procurement staff may discuss with a family the option of organ donation.

    All families of potential donors have the right to information and education about the donationprocess. The LifeBanc staff is available to answer any questions and will treat families with respectfor individual circumstances and beliefs.

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    OneCall for Life1-888-558-LIFE (5433)

    Routine Notification and Donor Referral Process Summary

    Hospital staff member calls LifeB