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can make him or her feel foolish should they not understand immediately. Avoid hostile repetition If the learner makes a mistake or underperforms, do not become patronizing or irritable, repeating the instructions step by step. Explain in more detail what you meant and avoid phrases such as “as I told you so before.” Level the playing field Booher explains that the person giving the instruction sits in the superior, smarter position and sometimes a subservient atti- tude overcomes the learner. I always learn something when I teach others: a new fact, a question I never thought of, or another way to solve a problem. Anticipate problems List hurdles the person could face and offer ways to deal with them upfront. Be approachable for reruns Let the person know you are available to review information or answer any questions that may arise. Consider the frequency of the task If a task has to be performed infrequently, write out instruc- tions so learners can refer to them in the future. Choose the right medium There are many ways to give information. Consider the number of people you are instructing and what the learning involves. With new nurses starting at various times during the year, we are using self-learning modules to teach select infor- mation, combined with practice sessions, observational experi- ences, and clinical experiences. Focus on the learner’s personality as well as your own Listen to what the people on the receiving end of your teaching are saying and, as much as possible, adapt your teach- ing style to the learner’s personality. Adjust your pace and perhaps your comments on the basis of the response of the learner. This may mean repeating key points, going slower, allowing for more time or moving more quickly through a skill. Always ask for feedback or evaluation of your teaching, and honestly evaluate that feedback when you teach the skill or deliver the information again. REFERENCE 1. Cooper C. IBD’s 10 secrets to success: 9. Giving instruction: maximizing results. Investors Business Daily 2001 Aug 10; Sect. A:3. WRITING AWARD The Journal of Vascular Nursing Article Award honors nurse authors for their efforts to create a publishable manuscript. Manuscripts will be judged for accuracy of content, relevance to vascular nursing practice, and excellence of writing style. All feature articles published in the Journal of Vascular Nursing during the calendar year will be considered for the JVN Article Award. The award recipient will be given a plaque commemorating the award and a cash prize donated by Mosby. The award and cash prize will be presented at the annual symposium. Announcement of the award recipient will appear in the Journal of Vascular Nursing and in SVN...prn. Vol. XX No. 1 PAGE 39 JOURNAL OF VASCULAR NURSING www.mosby.com/vascnurs

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Page 1: Writing award

can make him or her feel foolish should they not understandimmediately.

Avoid hostile repetitionIf the learner makes a mistake or underperforms, do not

become patronizing or irritable, repeating the instructions step bystep. Explain in more detail what you meant and avoid phrasessuch as “as I told you so before.”

Level the playing fieldBooher explains that the person giving the instruction sits in

the superior, smarter position and sometimes a subservient atti-tude overcomes the learner. I always learn something when Iteach others: a new fact, a question I never thought of, or anotherway to solve a problem.

Anticipate problemsList hurdles the person could face and offer ways to deal with

them upfront.

Be approachable for rerunsLet the person know you are available to review information

or answer any questions that may arise.

Consider the frequency of the taskIf a task has to be performed infrequently, write out instruc-

tions so learners can refer to them in the future.

Choose the right mediumThere are many ways to give information. Consider the

number of people you are instructing and what the learninginvolves. With new nurses starting at various times during theyear, we are using self-learning modules to teach select infor-mation, combined with practice sessions, observational experi-ences, and clinical experiences.

Focus on the learner’s personality as well asyour own

Listen to what the people on the receiving end of yourteaching are saying and, as much as possible, adapt your teach-ing style to the learner’s personality. Adjust your pace andperhaps your comments on the basis of the response of thelearner. This may mean repeating key points, going slower,allowing for more time or moving more quickly through a skill.Always ask for feedback or evaluation of your teaching, andhonestly evaluate that feedback when you teach the skill ordeliver the information again.

REFERENCE

1. Cooper C. IBD’s 10 secrets to success: 9. Giving instruction:maximizing results. Investors Business Daily 2001 Aug 10;Sect. A:3.

WRITING AWARD

The Journal of Vascular Nursing Article Award honors nurse authors for their efforts to createa publishable manuscript. Manuscripts will be judged for accuracy of content, relevance to vascularnursing practice, and excellence of writing style. All feature articles published in the Journal ofVascular Nursing during the calendar year will be considered for the JVN Article Award. The awardrecipient will be given a plaque commemorating the award and a cash prize donated by Mosby. Theaward and cash prize will be presented at the annual symposium. Announcement of the awardrecipient will appear in the Journal of Vascular Nursing and in SVN...prn.

Vol. XX No. 1 PAGE 39JOURNAL OF VASCULAR NURSINGwww.mosby.com/vascnurs