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WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION HONDIALE ORGANIZATION DE · PDF file 2015-09-27 · l world health organisation hondiale organization de la sant~ reg ional commrr'l'ee eleventh session :t.t:i.nila

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    WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION HONDIALE DE LA SANT~ ORGANIZATION

    REG IONAL COMMrr'l'EE

    Eleventh Session :t.t:I.nila 12-17 August 1960

    Agenda Item 8

    REGIONAL OFFICE FOR THE WESTERN PACIFIC

    BUREAU R~GIONAL DU PACIFIQUE OCCIDENTAL

    P.O. Box. 2932, MANILA

    18 August 1960

    ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

    BRlEF REPORTS RECEIVED FROM GOVERNMENTS ON THE PROGREBS OF THEm HEALTH ACTIVITlES

    Attached are brief reports received from the following governments

    in the Region on the progress of their health activities:

    AustraJ.ia Brunei China (Taiwan) Fiji Guam Hong Kong

    *Japa.n lecao lelaya. Netherlands New Guinea North Borneo Papua and New Guinea Philippines Singapore Timor Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Viet Nam

    * Available in English only.

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    AUSTRALIA.

    In addition to the attached report of the Forty Ninth Session of the National Health and ~iedical Research Council, the Government of Australia has submitted a copy of the ItReport of the D~rector General of Health" for the period 1 July 1956 - 30 June 1958.

    Representatives wishing to review this report are referred to the Enquiry Desk.

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    NATIONAL HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH C(lulTCIL

    FORTY NINTH SESSION, MkY 1960

    CCJI4:ONWEllTIrH 1959

    Immigration !1edical Service - Annual Report 1959

    The Department continued to conduct the Hospitals o'f the Immigration Medical Service in Migrant Reception Centres controlled by the Department of Immigration.

    Six hospitals with 348 beds, cots and bassinettes were in use at the beginning of the period under review. The bed complement was reduced to 281 at the end of the year •.

    The migrant intake decreased during 1959. In January 4 789 were accalllloda ted in the various Centres, whereas in December the number was 3 414 • •

    No babies were born in the Centre Hospitals, but 11.4 were born, in local hospitals, to Centre residents.

    A total of 3 552 in-patients were hospitalised for a total of 21 923 bed days. 59 097 out-patient treatments were given and a totalo! 838 infectious cases were treated, either as in or out-patients. 3 581 immunizations were effected.

    SUrgery was carried out in four Centres where 111 minor operations took place.

    gUARAIiTIliE 1959

    1st January 1959 to 31st December, 1959

    The Quarantine Service authorised under the Quarantine Act 1908-1950 was maintained during the year ended 31st December, 1959.

    There were no cases of quarantinable cliGet.::w dincovt;rcd by Quarantine examinations during 1959.

    Cases of non-quarantinable infectious diseases continued to arrive regularly on passenger vessels from Europe. The figures for the year were _

    Chicken pox 73 German measles 1 Infectious

    Hepatitis 1 Influenza 4 Measles 143 HorbUli 10 Mumps 21 PolioJl\Yelitis 1 Rubella 2 Scarlet Fever 3 Syphilis 2 Varicella 7

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    Membership

    REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEAI1I'H DEVEIDPNENT DURING 1959

    International - The World Health Organisation

    During the year, Colombia and the Republic of Guinea were admitted as members. There are now 87 Hember states and :3 Associate Members.

    Constitution

    There are three organos of 'YlHO - the World Health Assembly, the Executive Board, and the Secretariat. World Health Assemblies are held annually, where decisions are taken on policy programme and budget. The twelfth Assembly was held in Geneva in 1959. The Executive Board, a third of which is elected each year, consists of eighteen persons, and it meets twice a year. The Australian representative on the Board is Dr. A.J. Metoal.1'e.

    Regions of the World Health Organisation

    There is a central Secretariat, and smaller regional staffs far each of the six regions. Australia belongs to the Western Pacifio region, the headquarters of' which a re in Manila. Countries of the region meet annually and consider regional programme and budgets for subw.ission to the subsequent meeting of the World Health Assembly., The last meeting ot the Western Pacific Region took place in Taipei in September, 1959.

    Australia was represented at this meeting by Dr. G. M. Redshaw.

    Financing of International Health Projects

    The regular budget of WHO is decided by the Assembly, the member nations contributing on a fixed scale. Other funds available to vlHO are the Malaria Eradication Special Account, United Nations Technical Assistance Funds and Other Extra-budgetary Furlds. The sources of such other extra- budgetary :funds include the United nations Children'sFund and the Pan American Health Organization.

    The estimated eJq>enditure under these headings in 1959 is as follows:-

    Regular Budget ~uuaria Eradication Account Technical Assistance Other Extra-budgetar,y funds

    Total

    ~ 15 482 000 4 238 000 4 991 000

    22 477 000

    !jp 47 188 000

    /Field Projects •••

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    Field Proj cts

    During 1959 Expert Committees met on addiction producing drugs, biological standardisation, cancer, insecticides, leprosy, mental health, organisation of medical care, public health administration, rabies, radia- tion, specifications for phannaceutical preparations, non-proprietary names, tuberculosis, venereal infections and treponematoses, food additives, milk hl'giene, teacher preparation for health.education. The Committee on International quarantine and the Advisory Canmittee on medical research also met.

    Malarial Eradication Programme

    WHO during the year gave considerable emphasis to malarial eradica- tion campaigns in an endeavour to encourage countries to eradicate the diseu as speedily as possible before the mosquito vector becomes resist- ant to the new insecticides.

    During 1959 eradication was in progress in 61 countries, pre- eradication in 9 countries and pilot projects in 14 countries.

    CCH1ONWEAI:rH 1959 IEGISIATIal

    The National Health Act was amended in 1959 so as to increase Canmonweal th medical beneli t tor maj or surgery and certain other medical services. As a result of this legislation, the maxillllll1 combined Govermnant and fund benelit . payable tor a major operation is now £60 by comparison with the Jrevious max1DUlIl of £:30.

    The pharmaceutical benefits provisions of the National Health Act were also amended so as to extend co~iderably the list of drugs which IftB¥ be pr scribed under the scheme and at the same time to provide tor a charge of 5/- to be paid by the patient to chemist tor each prescription received.

    A minor amendment was also made to the Thera~utio Substances Act so as to provide that, in future, amendments to the British Pharmacopoeia will not take elfect for the purposes of the Therapeutic Substances legis- lation until such time as a date is fixed by the Minister by proclamation in the Gazette.

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    BRUIEI

    Report on the FrogI' ss of Health Activities during 196C*

    1 A GENERAL SURVEY

    There has been a stea~ development in most branches of the health work conducted within the state of Brunei where well-established facilities and modern aspects have been added to meet the clearly defined needs of the people.

    The rapid develO}Dent in the government, education, comrmmications and buildings throughout the state have been going on hand in hand with the development of environmental health services designed to provide the basic conditions of health¥ living.

    The rural health services are being improved tremendously with the vigorous support of fund and staff in an endeavour to slash down the high infant mortality rate in the State. The improved rural health services have shown reflection in the vital statistics. The activities of the maternal and child health clinics have been expanded in 1959.

    There is an acceleration in the development of buUding, equipment and staffing. ReDDVat10n and re-equipping of less modern bU'jJd 1ngs are cont1 .. nuing with the object of providing a higher stamard of working cond1t1ons for staff and the patients.

    Two IIII1lti-m1lJ.1on dollar hospi tala are being planned for the state. More health clinics have been cons tructed for the rural areas. HabU and static dispensaries are being increased.

    In the field of communicable diseases vaccination against po~eliti8 is a welcomed duty following the recent epidemic of poliolYW'el1t1s in th State.

    A vigorous campaign against tuberculosis, using mass miniature radio- graphy has been prosecuted since 1959.

    Malaria has been almost entirely eliminated in 1959, -there being only 66 cases in the whole State.

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    an increase of 4 950 on the total populaUon of SO 277 for 1958. This inorease was made up by a natural increase of population of 3 267 persons, and an excess of immigrants aver emigrants at 1 683 persons. The last census was taken in 1947 and revealed a countec;' population of 40 670 persons. A census is due to be ~en this year.

    2.2 Vital statistics: Please refer sWl'llllary of vital statistics (See Annex 1).

    2.3 Maternal and Child Care . The int'ant mortality rate of 93.29 for 1959 is stUl high. The neonatal

    rate of 24.51 for the same year compares Wlfavourably with the figures of 16.5 for the United Kingdan.. Out of 4 201 babies born in the State 1 614 (3$) birth

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