with pre-requisites Social Equity Sustainability Specializationsustaina ... competency faculty, who
with pre-requisites Social Equity Sustainability Specializationsustaina ... competency faculty, who
with pre-requisites Social Equity Sustainability Specializationsustaina ... competency faculty, who
with pre-requisites Social Equity Sustainability Specializationsustaina ... competency faculty, who

with pre-requisites Social Equity Sustainability Specializationsustaina ... competency faculty, who

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  • Sustainability Specialization

    “Going through this program, students will not only have an understanding of how to better protect the planet,” he said, “they will also have a better feel for how sustainability directly affects people, economics, business and how interdependent they are.”

    M I C H I G A N S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y

    For more program information contact: Geoff Habron, Director: habrong@msu.edu / 517.432.0073 Laurie Thorp, Assistant Director: thorpl@msu.edu / 517.432.4944

    Sustainability Specialization

    Elective courses with no (or minimal) pre-requisites

    Elective courses with pre-requisites

    Social Equity ANP 201 Sociocultural Diversity FW 211 Gender and Environmental Issues GEO 151 Cultural Geography ISS 215 Social Differentiation and Inequality ISS 225 Power, Authority, and Exchange ISS 310 People and Environment ISS 315 Global Diversity and Interdependence PHL 200 Introduction to Philosophy PHL 353 Core Themes in Peace and Justice Studies PHL 342 Environmental Ethics SOC 215 Race and Ethnicity SOC 216 Sex and Gender SOC 330 Social Stratification SOC 368 Science, Technology and Society SOC 452 Environment and Society

    ANP 321 Anthropology of Social Movements ANP 330 Race, Ethnicity and Nation ANP 430 Culture, Resources, Power ANP 431 Gender, Environment and Development ANP 436 Globalization and Justice IAH 231A Themes and Issues: Human Values and the Arts and Humanities PHL 452 Ethics and Development

    Ecological Integrity

    BS 110 Organisms and Populations ENT 205 Pest, Society and Environment FOR 220 Forests and the Global Environment FW 101 Fisheries & Wildlife Fundamentals FW 203 Resource Ecology GEO 204 World Regional Geography GEO 206 Physical Geography GLG 319 Introduction to Earth System Science ISB 201 Insects, Globalization, and Sustainability* ISP 203A Understanding Earth: Global Change ISP 203B Understanding Earth: Natural Hazards and the Environment ISP 217 Water and the Environment ISP 221 Earth Environment and Energy* LB 144 Biology I: Organismal Biology

    FOR 404 Forest Ecology FW 364 Ecological Problem Solving FW 444 Conservation Biology ZOL 355 Ecology

    Aesthetic Appreciation

    IAH 209 Art, the Visual, and Culture STA 112 Art and Design: Concepts and Practices WRA 341 Writing Nature and the Nature of Writing

    AH 241F Creative Arts and Humanities: Traditions in World Art (I) IAH 231B Themes and Issues: Moral Issues and the Arts and Humanities IAH 241E Creative Arts and Humanities: The Creative Process PHL 345 Aesthetics WRA 360 Visual Rhetoric

    Economic Vitality

    EC 201 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics EEP 255 Ecological Economics

    EC 310 Economics of Developing Countries EEP 320 Environmental Economics EEP 405 Corporate Environmental Management ESA 460 Natural Resource Economics FOR 464 Natural Resource Economics and Social Science MC 241 Politics and Markets MC 361 Political Economy and Comparative Public Policymaking: Environmental Policy in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin

    Farrall Agricultural Engineering Hall, Room 230 http://sustainabilityspecialization.msu.edu

    30% Post Consumer Recycled Paper Major Code 5333 November, 2010

  • Students in this program will work closely with a team of

    faculty and staff members to design projects, engage in

    co-curricular activities, and select course work that help them

    attain competency across the personal development domain

    and across the sustainability content areas.

    The academic specialization in sustainability requires students

    achieve wholeness and balance among the following

    competency areas:

    — social equity

    — economic vitality

    — ecological integrity

    — aesthetic understanding

    — critical thinking

    — systems thinking

    — personal awareness and development (knowledge of self)

    — civic engagement

    Students may achieve some of their competencies through

    non-credit experiences that become part of their learning

    portfolio. These portfolios will be assessed by a team of core

    competency faculty, who will apply rubrics designed around

    each competency area to the artifacts and evidence students

    turn in and reflect upon in order to demonstrate competency.

    This assessment will be an iterative process in which the core

    competency team will provide comments that students will

    have opportunity to respond to through revision of their work

    until competency is achieved.

    The increasing complexity of modern life brings challenges that

    require global leaders and citizens who are capable of understanding

    the relationships among the social, economic and environmental

    elements and who have skills that can assist institutions and

    communities to exercise sound judgments around our collective future.

    Students will acquire and demonstrate

    competency through a required introduc-

    tory course, 11 elective credits (see back

    for a list of suggested courses), a required

    for-credit field project experience (research,

    outreach, or teaching), annual portfolio

    assessment and final defense of the

    portfolio and project to a panel of faculty,

    staff, and community members.

    Participants include College of Agriculture

    and Natural Resources, College of Arts and

    Letters, Broad College of Business, James

    Madison College, College of Natural

    Science, and College of Social Science.

    The academic home for the program is the

    Department of Community, Agriculture,

    Recreation, and Resource Studies (CARRS).

    Dr. Geoffrey Habron (Fisheries and Wildlife

    and Sociology) and Dr. Laurie Thorp (RISE

    Program) will coordinate the program.

    3 required courses in the curriculum:

    ACR 187 Introduction to Sustainability Introduction to and integration of the balance among social equity, ecological integrity, economic vitality, civic engage- ment, aesthetic understanding, critical thinking, systems thinking, personal development, competency-based learning; portfolio assessment.

    ACR 387 Sustainability Practicum Integration of sustainability competencies through applied research, outreach or teaching project; project defense presentation.

    ACR 487 Sustainability Portfolio Capstone Capstone presentation and explanation of sustainability competencies.

  • Students in this program will work closely with a team of

    faculty and staff members to design projects, engage in

    co-curricular activities, and select course work that help them

    attain competency across the personal development domain

    and across the sustainability content areas.

    The academic specialization in sustainability requires students

    achieve wholeness and balance among the following

    competency areas:

    — social equity

    — economic vitality

    — ecological integrity

    — aesthetic understanding

    — critical thinking

    — systems thinking

    — personal awareness and development (knowledge of self)

    — civic engagement

    Students may achieve some of their competencies through

    non-credit experiences that become part of their learning

    portfolio. These portfolios will be assessed by a team of core

    competency faculty, who will apply rubrics designed around

    each competency area to the artifacts and evidence students

    turn in and reflect upon in order to demonstrate competency.

    This assessment will be an iterative process in which the core

    competency team will provide comments that students will

    have opportunity to respond to through revision of their work

    until competency is achieved.

    The increasing complexity of modern life brings challenges that

    require global leaders and citizens who are capable of understanding

    the relationships among the social, economic and environmental

    elements and who have skills that can assist institutions and

    communities to exercise sound judgments around our collective future.

    Students will acquire and demonstrate

    competency through a required introduc-

    tory course, 11 elective credits (see back

    for a list of suggested courses), a required

    for-credit field project experience (research,

    outreach, or teaching), annual portfolio

    assessment and final defense of the

    portfolio and project to a panel of faculty,

    staff, and community members.

    Participants include College of Agriculture

    and Natural Resources, College of Arts and

    Letters, Broad College of Business, James

    Madison College, College of Natural

    Science, and College of Social Science.

    The academic home for the program is the

    Department of Community, Agriculture,

    Recreation, and Resource Studies (CARRS).

    Dr. Geoffrey Habron (Fisheries and Wildlife

    and Sociology) and Dr. Laurie Thorp (RISE

    Program) will coordinate the program.

    3 required courses in the curriculum:

    ACR 187 Introduction to Sustainability Introduction to and integration of the balance among social equity, ecological integrity, economic vitality, civic engage- ment, aesthetic understanding, critical thinking, systems thinking, personal development, competency-based learning